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Criminal Justice Resources :

Community Policing


Note: Also see Law Enforcement for more general articles and web sites about law enforcement or policing.

Eighty-five percent of residents surveyed in 12 [U.S.] cities reported satisfaction with the police who served their neighborhood, according to a 1998 Justice Department survey ... .The proportion of residents reporting that they were `very satisfied' or `satisfied' with the police ranged from 97 percent in Madison, Wisconsin to 78 percent in Washington, D.C ... .In the 12 cities about 3 percent said they were `very dissatisfied' with the police. More than half of all respondents said they were familiar with the term `community policing,' and 54 percent said that police officers practice community policing in their neighborhoods. Across the 12 cities the percentage of residents who thought that their local police practiced community policing ranged from 42 percent in Knoxville to 67 percent in Chicago. Sixty percent of respondents indicated that in the past 12 months the police had worked at least `somewhat' with neighborhood residents on crime prevention and safety." Source: Surveys in 12 Cities Show Widespread Community Support for Police, Press Release (3 Jun 1999).


Making Neighborhoods Safe
Community-oriented policing means changing the daily work of the police to include investigating problems as well as incidents. It means working with the good guys, and not just against the bad guys. This sort of police work is now being practiced in cities all over America. The pattern constitutes the beginnings of the most significant redefinition of police work in the past half century. James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling, the Atlantic Monthly, February 1989.



Web Sites


  • MSU Regional Community Policing Institute
  • National Center for Community Policing
  • Northwestern University Institute of Policy Research Community Policing Papers
  • Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
  • Policing.com : Your Headquarters for Community Policing
  • Wichita State University Regional Community Policing Training Institute Policy Papers and Resource Documents on Community Policing
  • Wichita State University Regional Community Policing Training Institute Training Materials on Community Policing


    Articles and Publications

  • Asking for Stuff (Fundraising)
  • Basic Issues in Training : A Foundation for Community Policing
  • Call Management and Community Policing: A Guide for Law Enforcement
  • Community Criminal Justice: What Community Policing Teaches
  • Community Policing: A Taxpayer's Perspective
  • Community Policing and D.A.R.E.
  • Community Policing and D.A.R.E. : A Practitioner's Perspective
  • Community Policing and Domestic Violence
  • Community Policing and Political Posturing: Playing the Game
  • Community Policing and Politics
  • Community Policing and The Challenge of Diversity
  • Community Policing and The New Immigrants: Latinos in Chicago
  • Community Policing Beyond the Big Cities
  • Community Policing Checklist
  • Community Policing: Community Input Into Police Policy-Making
  • Community Policing in Chicago
  • Community Policing Is Homeland Security
  • Community Policing : Learning the Lessons of History
  • Community Policing Programs: A Twenty-Year View
  • Community Policing : The Line Officer's Perspective
  • Community Policing Topical Collection from NIJ
  • Community Policing : Training Issues
  • Community Policing : University Input into Campus Police Policy Making
  • Community Policing : Would You Know It If You Saw It?
  • Considerations in Program Development and Evaluation in Community Policing
  • COPS Reports from the Field
  • Crime Prevention and Community Policing: A Vital Link
  • Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design and Community Policing
  • Facilitated Self-Assessment of Community Policing
  • Further Readings on Community Policing
  • Human Resources Issues for Community Policing
  • I'm Too Tired for Community Policing
  • The Impact of Foot Patrol on Black and White Perceptions of Policing
  • Implementation Challenges in Community Policing:
    Innovative Neighborhood-Oriented Policing in Eight Cities
  • Implementing a Community Policing Model for Work with Juveniles:
    An Exploratory Study
  • Integrity for a Community Policing Environment
  • Job Satisfaction: A Comparison of Foot Patrol Versus
    Motor Patrol Officers
  • Kids, COPS, and Communities (Issues and Practices)
  • Labor-Management Approach to Community Policing
  • Law Enforcement in a Time of Community Policing
  • Marketing Community Policing in the News: A Missed Opportunity?
  • The Meaning of Community in Community Policing
  • Measuring Quality: The Scope of Community Policing
  • Measuring What Matters: Proceedings...
  • The Mission of Policing: The Lost Imperative
  • The Neighborhood Network Center: Part One
  • Organizational Survey: An Overview
  • Perceptions of Safety: A Comparison of Foot Patrol Versus
    Motor Patrol Officers
  • Performance Profiles of Foot Versus Motor Officers
  • Philosophy and Role of Community Policing
  • Police Department Community Survey
  • Police Officer Employee Survey
  • Policing Neighborhoods: A Report from Indianapolis
  • Policing Neighborhoods: A Report from St. Petersburg
  • Preventing Civil Disturbances: A Community Policing Approach
  • Problem Solving in Practice: Implementing Community Policing in Chicago
  • Protecting Your Community From Terrorism
  • Rapid Response and Community Policing: Are They Really In Conflict?
  • Reflections on the Move to Community Policing
  • Reinventing the Wheel in Police Work: A Sense of History
  • Specialized Gang Units: Form and Function in Community Policing
  • Status of Contemporary Community Policing Programs
  • Taking Stock: Community Policing in Chicago
  • Toward Development of Meaningful and Effective Performance Evaluations
  • Turning Concept into Practice: The Aurora, Colorado Story
  • Understanding Community Policing
  • Uniform Crime Reporting and Community Policing: An Historical Perspective
  • The Use of a Training Design Team To Implement Community Policing


    Source Links (Alphabetical) With Annotations

    Asking for Stuff
    http://web.archive.org/web/20060103061515/
    http://www.communitypolicing.org/publications/comlinks/cl_4/c4_moor.htm

    A police officer offers tips on how to ask for support to carry out a community policing project. Source: Community Links, Ph V, Vol.3, Winter 1998. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Basic Issues in Training : A Foundation for Community Policing - Making the Transition to Mission-Driven Training
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/basic.html
    Ron Sloan, Robert C. Trojanowicz, and Bonnie Bucqueroux, 1987. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 12a.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Call Management and Community Policing: A Guide for Law Enforcement
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/e05031968_web.PDF
    McEwen, Tom, and D. Spence, R. Wolff, J. Wartell, and B. Webster (2003). (Final Report, 255 pages). U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. This guidebook is based on a national survey, telephone interviews, and site visits, and highlights innovative police call management strategies that support community policing.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Criminal Justice: What Community Policing Teaches
    http://www.policing.com/articles/ccj.html
    Proponents of Community Policing (including this author) sincerely believe that this new paradigm has the potential to serve as the model for dramatic reform of the entire criminal justice system. Community policing's successes inspire optimism that the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and corrections, could begin to function as a seamless whole, with all elements working as partners with the people who have the most to gain or lose in making their neighborhoods better and safer places in which to live and work. At the same time, however, the controversial and complicated history of community policing also teaches object lessons about the daunting problems that implementing a community criminal justice system would face.
    The purpose of this article by Bonnie Bucqueroux is to explore both the opportunities and the obstacles, in the hope of encouraging experiment and innovation and avoiding mistakes.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: A Taxpayer's Perspective
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/taxpayer.html
    Robert Trojanowicz, Marilyn Steele, and Susan Trojanowicz, 1986. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 7.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and D.A.R.E.
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/cpdare.html
    David L. Carter, Michigan State University, School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and D.A.R.E. : A Practitioner's Perspective
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/comdare.pdf
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/comdare.txt
    American citizens are concerned about crime. A review of public opinion polls and news stories shows that Americans want to see new initiatives for dealing with drug abuse, gang activities, violence in the schools and streets, nonviolent crime, and the fear that is eroding the quality of life in many communities. A number of programs have emerged to deal with these problems. Neighborhood Watch, Operation Identification, use of school educational resource officers (ERO's), street sweeps, and a wide range of specialized programs all target local problems throughout the United States. This bulletin focuses on two of these evolving initiatives: community policing and Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.).David L. Carter, BJA Bulletin, June 1995, 19pp.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and Domestic Violence
    http://www.policing.com/articles/cpanddv.html
    Few calls inspire more dread in police officers than a domestic. There is the unpredictability - emotions are running high, and alcohol and drugs can make them run even higher. Sadly as well, the scene all too often plays out against a wrenching backdrop of sobbing, frightened children. And perhaps most frustrating of all are those cases where police make repeat calls to the same address, time and again, only to find the victim trying to shield the perpetrator from arrest. Why don't these women just leave? Article by Bonnie Bucqueroux.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and Political Posturing: Playing the Game
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/politics.pdf
    The movement in law enforcement toward community-based policing has prompted debate about such things as broadening the police mission, empowering officers, the effects of community policing on the police role as a government department, and the difficulty of organizational change. While inferred by the literature, community policing as a political dynamic has had limited discussion. Specifically, this paper discusses a range of variables which relate to managing change in light of politics as related to community policing. David Carter, MSU School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and Politics
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/cppolit.html
    A paper by David Carter from the MSU School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and the Challenge of Diversity
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/diverse.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz and Bonnie Bucqueroux, 1991. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 21.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing and the New Immigrants: Latinos in Chicago
    https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/189908.pdf
    Wesley G. Skogan. Northwestern University, Institute of Policy Research. July 2002. NCJ189908.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing Beyond the Big Cities
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/205946.pdf
    Can police and sheriffs in small cities and rural areas conduct community policing? This NIJ Research for Policy (NCJ 205946) discusses a study of eight law enforcement agencies in small cities and rural areas that have implemented a wide variety of problem-solving initiatives. Researchers identified five progressive stages of community policing. Community policing was most successful when officers worked closely with residents and other local partners to develop innovative approaches to solving local problems. Nov. 2004. 10pp. (NCJ 205946)
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing Checklist
    http://www.policing.com/articles/checklist.html
    http://www.policing.com/articles/pdf/COMMUNITY%20POLICING%20CHECKLIST.pdf
    Apply this checklist to your department periodically to gauge your progress in maximizing community policing. Article by Robert Trojanowicz & Bonnie Bucqueroux.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: Community Input Into Police Policy-Making
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/input.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz, Richard Gleason, Bonnie Poland, and David Sinclair, 1987. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 12.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing in Chicago: Year Two
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/chicago.txt
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing Is Homeland Security
    http://www.policing.com/articles/terrorism.html
    For the past decade, community policing reformers have struggled to replace the image of police as warriors battling the bad guys to proactive problem solvers working as partners with the community. Now the militarists within police circles are capitalizing on fears of terrorism to argue for going "back to basics" - no more "touchy-feely" policing in the face of this new threat. The danger, however, is that retreating from community policing not only risks reversing hard-won gains in reducing violent crime, but it would become even more difficult for police to find the terrorists among us. Article by Drew Diamond, Police Executive Research Forum, and Bonnie Bucqueroux.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: Learning the Lessons of History
    http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cjs07.htm
    An old saying holds that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Unfortunately, many officers seem to think the history of police work began the day they first pinned on a badge and strapped on a gunbelt. For this reason, each emerging movement in law enforcement tends to be seen as something completely new, without historical context. Such is largely the case today with community policing. Article by Sgt. Jeffrey Patterson, Clearwater, Fl, Police Dept., courtesy of 'Lectric Law Library.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing Programs: A Twenty-Year View
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/20year.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz, Bonnie Pollard, Francine Colgan, and Hazel Harden, 1986. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 10.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: The Line Officer's Perspective
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/communit.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz and Bonnie Pollard, 1986. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 11.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing Topical Collection from NIJ
    http://nij.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/Pub_search.aspx?searchtype=basic&category=99&location=top&PSID=38
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing : Training Issues
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/issues.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Joanne Belknap, 1986. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 9.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: University Input into Campus Police Policy Making
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/uninput.html
    Robert Trojanowicz, Bruce Benson, and Susan Trojanowicz , 1988. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 14.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Community Policing: Would You Know It If You Saw It?
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/commun.html
    Francis X Hartmann, Lee P. Brown, Darrel Stephens, 1989. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 16.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Considerations in Program Development and Evaluation in Community Policing
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/CP%20Devel%20and%20Eval.pdf
    This paper describes some of the fundamental steps in planning and developing a community policing initiative in a police department. Also included is a description of factors (variables) and processes useful in evaluating specific programs or the community policing initiative overall. David Carter, Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Crime Prevention and Community Policing: A Vital Link
    http://web.archive.org/web/20021213225549/
    http://www.ncpc.org/5pol1dc.htm

    An article that examines how crime prevention and community policing are linked based on philosophy and operations in law enforcement.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design and Community Policing
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/crimepre.txt
    A NIJ publication by Dan Fleissner and Fred Heinzelmann, August 1996.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Facilitated Self-Assessment of Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/cp/facself.html
    Jane P. White and Doak Bloss. Describe the uses of the facilitated self-assessment, its specific products, and potential for fostering organizational change.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Human Resources Issues for Community Policing
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/Personnel%20Issues.pdf
    This paper examines fundamental issues related to employing people who would make "the best" community police officers as well as personnel development which best supports the community policing philosophy. Also included are discussions of higher education and policing, labor relations issues, performance evaluation, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. The paper is intended to be a primer. David Carter, MSU School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Iím Too Tired for Community Policing
    http://web.archive.org/web/20060103065847/
    http://www.communitypolicing.org/publications/exchange/e19_98/e19gleason.htm

    A short article from the January/February 1998 of Community Policing Exchange on community policing and the ethics and personal responsibility policing has for your community.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    The Impact of Foot Patrol on Black and White Perceptions of Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/impact.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Dennis W. Banas, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 4.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Implementation Challenges in Community Policing: Innovative Neighborhood-Oriented Policing in Eight Cities
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/implcp.txt
    A NIJ research in brief by Susan Sadd and Randolph M. Grinc, February 1996.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Implementing a Community Policing Model for Work with Juveniles : An Exploratory Study
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/juviecp.html
    Joanne Belknap, Merry Morash, and Robert Trojanowicz, 1986. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 8.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Integrity for a Community Policing Environment
    http://web.archive.org/web/20060117011935/
    http://www.communitypolicing.org/pf/integrity/

    Report sponsored by the Police Foundation.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Job Satisfaction: A Comparison of Foot Patrol Versus Motor Patrol Officers
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/jobsat.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Dennis W. Banas, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 2.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Kids, COPS, and Communities (Issues and Practices)
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/169599.txt
    National organizations such as the 4-H Club and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America have had years of success helping at-risk youth develop into responsible citizens. The experiences of these organizations, and recent innovations in community policing, provide the basis for this report, authored by Dr. Marcia Chaiken. Designed to help law enforcement, administrators, and policymakers, Kids, COPS, and Communities explores cooperative, community-oriented means of preventing juvenile crime.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    A Labor-Management Approach to Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/cp/labor.html
    Michael J. Polzin.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Law Enforcement in a Time of Community Policing
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/combat.pdf
    An article from the NIJ Research Review on a study of the Richmond Police Departmentand its implementation of community policing.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Marketing Community Policing in the News: A Missed Opportunity?
    http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/pubs-sum/200473.htm
    The police and the media need each other: Most people form their impressions of the justice system through media accounts. This National Institute of Justice Research for Practice explores this relationship and finds that although community policing has been favorably received by the media, coverage is relatively light compared to crime stories. Recommendations and examples of successful creative outreach are provided.
    Also listed in Magic : the MSU Libraries online catalog.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    The Meaning of Community in Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/themea.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz and Mark H. Moore, 1988. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 15.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Measuring Quality: The Scope of Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/cpmeasure.html
    A paper by David Carter from the MSU School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Measuring What Matters: Proceedings From the Police Research Institute Meetings
    http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/pubs-sum/170610.htm
    Are traditional measures of police performance still meaningful for law enforcement agencies that have adopted the principles of community policing? Measuring What Matters: Proceedings From the Police Research Institute Meetings presents a compilation of papers presented at three meetings convened to focus on how to measure crime, disorder, and fear; public attitudes and expectations; and the performance of police in light of the expanded goals of community policing. The authors examine the implications of measuring community policing performance and provide new assessment criteria for organizations to monitor their community policing efforts. July 1999.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Michigan State University Regional Community Policing Institute
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/rcpi/default.htm
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    The Mission of Policing: The Lost Imperative
    http://web.archive.org/web/20031123120834/
    http://www.concentric.net/~dwoods/mission.htm

    An article that reviews the mission and models of community policing. These include the problems with the traditional model and the need for a new model for community policing. Article from the Community Policing Pages by DeVere Woods and Joanne Ziembo-Vogl. 1997.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    National Center for Community Policing
    Publications
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/webpubs.html
    Provides full text publications and article reprints from Footprints, the Center's newsletter. Sponsored by the Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    The Neighborhood Network Center: Part One
    Basic Issues and Planning and Implementation in Lansing, Michigan
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/tnnc.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz, Bonnie Bucqueroux, Tina McLanus, and David Sinclair, 1992. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 23.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Northwestern University
    Institute for Policy Research
    Community Policing Papers
    http://web.archive.org/web/20040208072235/
    www.northwestern.edu/ipr/publications/policing.html

    For the past five years, IPR researchers have been evaluating Chicago's Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS), the nation's most ambitious experiment in community policing. CAPS was unveiled in April 1993 in five prototype police districts and went citywide a year later. Political scientist Wesley Skogan is leading an academic team from Northwestern, DePaul, Loyola, and the University of Illinois at Chicago, which is evaluating the planning, implementation, and impact of CAPS throughout the city.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Office of Community-Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/
    To help communities better fight crime, the the Office of Community Oriented-Policing Services is dedicated to putting 100,000 additional officers on America's streets and to promoting community policing strategies nationwide. Our work is part of the U.S. Department of Justice's comprehensive approach to combating crime. As of February 1997, the U.S. Department of Justice and COPS have awarded grants for the hiring or redeployment of more than 54,000 police officers and sheriff's deputies to the nation's streets. This brings us over halfway to the President's goal of adding 100,000 additional officers to the nations's streets by the year 2000. The web site features: a basic overview of the COPS program, information about COPS grants and how to apply for them, information about training and technical assistance in community policing, news releases and columns about the COPS program, past issues of COPS newsletters, publications, and grant proposals, short narratives describing what's working with community policing, and links to other community oriented policng web sites.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Organizational Survey: An Overview
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/cp/survey.html
    J. Kevin Ford. Departments considering the move to community oriented policing must collect systematic data to help in their strategic planning deliberations. One method for gathering useful data is through the collection of survey information from officers in the department. The Michigan State University (MSU) School of Criminal Justice, in cooperation with various police departments throughout the state of Michigan, has developed an Organizational Survey. The Organizational Survey focuses on officer perceptions of key issues relevant to the move to community oriented policing. This web site contains specific information as to the purpose of the survey, the information gathered through the survey, issues of survey administration, and how the results of the survey are disseminated.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Perceptions of Safety : A Comparison of Foot Patrol Versus Motor Patrol Officers
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/percept.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Dennis W. Banas, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 1.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Performance Profiles of Foot Versus Motor Officers
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/perform.html
    Dennis M. Payne and Robert Trojanowicz, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 6.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Philosophy and Role of Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/cpphil.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz and David Carter, 1988. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 13.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Police Department Community Survey
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/Community%20Survey.pdf
    This is a model survey containing questions which may be useful to understanding issues and concerns within the community. Since this is a model survey, it is recommended that questions be used as guidelines only. Relevant questions can be selected out of the survey and modified as necessary to best apply to your community. David L. Carter, Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Police Officer Employee Survey
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/Employee%20Survey.pdf
    This is a model survey containing questions which may be useful to understanding issues and concerns among sworn and nonsworn police employees with respect to a change toward community policing. Since this is a model survey, it is recommended that questions be used as guidelines only. Relevant questions can be selected out of the survey and modified as necessary to best apply to your community. David L. Carter, Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Policing Neighborhoods: A Report from Indianapolis
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/fs000223.pdf
    Community policing encourages local law enforcement agencies to increase cooperation with the citizens they serve. Criminal justice researchers are currently exploring how this approach affects both police behavior and citizens' responses. This Research Preview reports some findings from a study of policing in Indianapolis, Indiana. Stephen D. Mastrofski, Roger B. Parks, Albert J. Reiss, Jr., and Robert E. Worden, National Institute of Justice Research Preview, July 1998.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Policing Neighborhoods: A Report from St. Petersburg
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/fs000245.pdf
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles1/fs000245.txt
    Agencies implementing community policing are striving to change how police do their work and what contributions citizens make to policing. Researchers are exploring what policing is like in St. Petersburg, Florida, a city that has implemented community policing. Stephen D. Mastrofski, Roger B. Parks, Albert J. Reiss, Jr., and Robert E. Worden. National Institute of Justice Research Preview, July 1999.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Policing.com : Your Headquarters for Community Policing
    http://www.policing.com/
    This website is dedicated to providing the latest information, training, advice, and discussion on community policing, the most important police reform in our lifetime. Community policing is a philosophy based on the recognition that nothing can outperform dedicated people working together to make their communities better and safer places in which to live, work, and raise children. Policing.com was created by Bonnie Bucqueroux, former Associate Director of the National Center for Community Policing at Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Preventing Civil Disturbances: A Community Policing Approach
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/pcd.html
    Robert C. Trojanowicz, 1989. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 18.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Problem Solving in Practice: Implementing Community Policing in Chicago
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/179556.pdf
    Examines a small sample of beats to determine how Chicago's problem-solving model has been implemented and isolates factors that explain success and failure. Wesley G. Skogen, Susan M. Hartnett, Jill Dubois, Jennifer T. Comey, Marianne Kaiser, and Justine H. Lovig, Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University, 1998.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Protecting Your Community From Terrorism: Volume 1, Local-Federal Partnerships
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/protect_comm_terror_v1.pdf
    Protecting your Community from Terrorism Volume 1, Local-Federal Partnerships Ė 9/30/2004 This is the first in a series on Protecting Your Community From Terrorism: Strategies for Local Law Enforcement. This PERF white paper funded by the COPS Office is based in large part on an unprecedented executive session in November 2002 that brought together chief law enforcement executives, FBI Special Agents in Charge and antiterrorist experts, and other leading thinkers on how law enforcement will deal with the new terrorist threat. It was a no-holds-barred meeting in which candid debates were conducted on such issues as how to promote effective partnerships; security clearances and information sharing; joint terrorism task forces; FBI strategies; intelligence; multijurisdictional information sharing; and training and awareness. The result is more than 50 recommendations detailed in this paper-set largely by consensus and an urgent desire to move our preparedness and response forward in these difficult times.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Protecting your Community from Terrorism Volume 2, Working with Diverse Communities
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/protect_comm_terror_v2.pdf
    This is the second in a series on Protecting Your Community From Terrorism: Strategies for Local Law Enforcement. This PERF white paper is the result of a compelling executive session in June 2003 sponsored by the COPS Office which brought together law enforcement chief executives, diverse community leaders and advocates, and federal law enforcement officials. The report details myriad recommendations for how law enforcement and minority communities can better work together to protect against future terrorist attacks, prevent backlash violence against vulnerable groups, and sensitize officers to cultural issues that can affect interviewing and information sharing.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Protecting your Community from Terrorism Volume 3, Preparing for and Responding to Bioterrorism
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/protect_comm_terror_v3.pdf
    This report discusses the relative threats of various biological and chemical agents and the response challenges for first responders. The chapters cover five critical areas involved in preparing for and responding to a bioterrorist event: detecting a biological attack, notifying the proper first responders, intervening and working with other stakeholders, managing health care surge demands, and maintaining communication among all involved agencies and the public.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Protecting your Community from Terrorism Volume 4: The Production and Sharing of Intelligence
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/protect_comm_terror_v4.pdf
    The fourth volume of the Protecting Your Community From Terrorism series discusses the importance of intelligence-led policing and its correlation with problem-oriented policing principles. The report outlines criteria for an effective intelligence function at all levels of government-highlighted by important sidebar contributions from key players in the fields of intelligence and policing. Among the report's key recommendations is a call to more clearly define "intelligence" and what the needs, expectations and responsibilities are of various agencies in the intelligence community and law enforcement profession, as well as a need for a plan to ensure integrated nationwide and regional intelligence sharing mechanisms.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Rapid Response and Community Policing: Are They Really In Conflict?
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/rapid.html
    Richard C. Larson, 1990. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 20.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Reflections on the Move to Community Policing
    http://webs.wichita.edu/depttools/depttoolsmemberfiles/rcpi/Policy%20Papers/Reflections%20on%20Comm%20Pol.pdf
    This paper discusses issues related to the conceptual foundation of the community policing philosophy. It seeks to demonstrate that the change in policing philosophy is consistent with changes in other social arenas, particularly medicine, the auto industry, and general management philosophy. The paperís intent is to demonstrate that the movement toward community policing is driven by changes in the larger society but is also based on experimentation in policing to determine what works and what does not. David Carter, Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Reinventing the Wheel in Police Work: A Sense of History
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/reinve.html
    A.F. Brandstatter, 1989. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 17.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Specialized Gang Units: Form and Function in Community Policing
    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/html/cd_rom/solution_gang_crime/pubs/SpecializedGangUnitsFormFunctionCommunityOct2004.pdf
    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), October 2004. This research examined whether community policing and specialized gang units are complementary or conflicting approaches. The research approach consisted of qualitative examination of police department procedures and practices, and extensive field observation of gang personnel.
    (Last checked 07/07/05)

    The Status of Contemporary Community Policing Programs
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/status.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Hazel A. Harden, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 3.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Taking Stock: Community Policing In Chicago
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/189909.pdf
    Wesley G. Skogan et al. Northwestern University, Institute for Policy Research. July 2002. 39pp.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Toward Development of Meaningful and Effective Performance Evaluations
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/toward.html
    Robert Trojanowicz and Bonnie Bucqueroux, 1992. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 22.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Turning Concept into Practice: The Aurora, Colorado Story
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/turning.html
    Jerry Williams and Ron Sloan, 1990. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 19.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Understanding Community Policing: A Framework for Action
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles/commp.txt
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/commp.pdf
    An in-depth monograph from the Bureau of Justice Assistance that covers an introduction and history of community policing, its core components, implementation and assessment of a community policing program. Prepared by the Community Policing Consortium, August 1994.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Uniform Crime Reporting and Community Policing: An Historical Perspective
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~people/cp/uniform.html
    Dennis W. Banas and Robert Trojanowicz, 1985. National Center for Community Policing, National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Center, Community Policing Series Report No. 5.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    The Use of a Training Design Team To Implement Community Policing
    http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/cp/design.html
    J. Kevin Ford. Includes police department training needs assessment survey.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Wichita State University
    Regional Community Policing Training Institute
    Policy Papers and Resource Documents on Community Policing
    http://webs.wichita.edu/?u=rcpi&p=/PolicyPapers/
    Includes many papers by David L. Carter, Michigan State University.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    Wichita State University
    Regional Community Policing Training Institute
    Training Materials on Community Policing
    http://webs.wichita.edu/?u=rcpi&p=/TrainingMaterials/
    Includes a lot of powerpoint presentations.
    (Last checked 06/04/13)

    For more information about Community Policing, search the MSU Libraries Online Catalog

     

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