Michigan State University

Ask a Librarian | Hours | Account     Support MSU Libraries


Web Site Evaluation

Evaluating Information – Applying the CRAAP Test
Evaluating Information on the Internet (Johns Hopkins)
Evaluating Internet Research Sources (Virtual Salt)
Evaluating Web Pages (UC Berkeley)
Evaluating Web Sites: Criteria and Tools (Cornell)
Fast Track: A Student's Guide to High-Performance Research (BGSU)
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
How to Evaluate a Web Site
How to Separate Good Data from Bad (New York Times)
Texas Information Literacy Center
Whales in the Minnesota River? Only on the Web.... (New York Times)


Web Site Evaluation Entries With Annotations

Evaluating Information – Applying the CRAAP Test
http://www.csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf
When you search for information, you're going to find lots of it . . . but is it good information? You will have to determine that for yourself, and the CRAAP Test can help. The CRAAP Test is a list of questions to help you evaluate the information. Courtesy of the University of California, Chico.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

Evaluating Information Found on the Internet (Johns Hopkins)
http://guides.library.jhu.edu/evaluatinginformation
The World Wide Web offers students, teachers and researchers the opportunity to find information and data from all over the world. The Web is easy to use, both for finding information and for publishing it electronically. Because so much information is available, and because that information can appear to be fairly “anonymous”, it is necessary to develop skills to evaluate what you find. When you use a research or academic library, the books, journals and other resources have already been evaluated by scholars, publishers and librarians. Every resource you find has been evaluated in one way or another before you ever see it. When you are using the World Wide Web, none of this applies. There are no filters. Because anyone can write a Web page, documents of the widest range of quality, written by authors of the widest range of authority, are available on an “even playing field”. Excellent resources reside along side the most dubious. The Internet epitomizes the concept of Caveat lector: Let the reader beware. This document discusses the criteria by which scholars in most fields evaluate print information, and shows how the same criteria can be used to assess information found on the Internet.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

Evaluating Internet Research Sources
http://www.virtualsalt.com
Includes section on evaluating websites.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

Evaluating Web Pages (UC Berkeley)
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html
(Last checked 01/11/12)

Evaluating Web Sites: Criteria and Tools
http://www.library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/webeval.html
A guide created by Michael Engle, a librarian at Cornell University. Last updated July 12, 2001.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

Fast Track: A Student's Guide to High-Performance Research
http://libguides.bgsu.edu/fast_track
Includes section on evaluating websites. A guide by the Bowling Green State University Library.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, or
Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources
http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/eval.html
Susan E. Beck, New Mexico State University Libraries. Updated July 24, 2001.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

How to Evaluate a Web Site
http://www.llrx.com/features/webeval.htm
Includes links to many more evaluation web pages as well as providing advice. LaJean Humphries, Law Resource Xchange, Dec. 2, 2002.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

"How to Separate Good Data from Bad"
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/03/circuits/articles/04tips.html
An online article by Tina Kelley appearing in the New York Times, Circuits, D9, March 4, 1999. Requires free registration to access article. Also check out companion article "Whales on the Minnesota River".
(Last checked 01/11/12)

TILT (Texas Information Literacy Tutorial)
http://www.fnc.edu/FNC-ILT/
Developed by the Digital Information Literacy Office at the University of Texas at Austin, this site introduces undergraduate students to basic research sources and skills. TILT is essentially an interactive tutorial organized in three modules (selecting, searching, and evaluating) which may be completed in any order. Before beginning the tutorial, users select one of six "current Internet issues" (Free Speech, Global Communities, Laws & Regulations, etc.) and the ensuing tutorial will supply related examples. Each of the fairly deep and well-organized modules contains a list of key concepts and skills and a quiz. Some of the highlights include finding and using articles in scholarly journals, navigating databases and search engines, and perhaps most importantly, evaluating print and Web sources. While the some of the images and animations seem perhaps more appropriate for younger users, the tutorial as a whole offers a detailed and accessible introduction to important research techniques and skills for university students. Source: Scout Report, December 3, 1999.
(Last checked 01/11/12)

"Whales in the Minnesota River?" Only on the Web, Where Skepticism Is a Required Navigational Aid
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/03/circuits/articles/04trut.html
Tourists drove six hours to Mankato, Minn., in search of underground caves and hot springs and yes whales in the Minnesota River mentioned on a Web site. When they arrived, there were no such attractions. An online article by Tina Henry appearing in the New York Times, Circuits, D1, March 4, 1999. Requires free registration to access article. Also check out companion article "How to Separate Good Data From Bad".
(Last checked 01/11/12)



 

Google
WWW http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/general/
 

Ownership Statement
Jon Harrison : Page Editor
Michigan State University Libraries
100 Library
E. Lansing, MI 48824-1048
E-mail: harris23@mail.lib.msu.edu
Last revised 01/11/12