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Academic Fundraising Web Resources (102)


 

Web Sites | Books | Additional Resources
 

This web site is intended as a starting point for those who are interested in learning more about foundations, fundraising, proposal writing, etc. from an academic (college or university) point of view.


Web Sites

10 TIPS FOR WRITING A SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP PROPOSAL
http://www.irex.org/news/10-tips-writing-successful-international-research-fellowship-proposal
I've had the pleasure of chairing research fellowship panels for over a decade. In these years I’ve heard debate surrounding nearly 3,000 applicants, both junior and senior scholars, all trying to secure very limited research funding. A while back some colleagues in the academic community encouraged me to pull some tips together from my experience in these meetings and also having worked with so many different peer reviewers over the years, from a variety of disciplines. Joyce Warner, IREX.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

15 WAYS TO RAISE FUNDS FOR YOUR EXCHANGE PROGRAM
http://web.archive.org/web/20131206193626/http://www.miusa.org/ncde/financialaid/fundraising
1) Letter to friends and relatives
2) Form a support group
3) The Chain letter
4) Have a rummage sale
5) Grants from your school
6) Local businesses
7) Special Collection
8) Approach your local place of worship
9) Community groups
10) Support from employer and coworkers
11) Loans from relatives
12) Letters to alumni associations
13) Sell something door to door
14) Have a fundraising party
15) Have a bake or garage sale
Courtesy of Mobility International USA. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ABSTRACT KILLERS, see HOW NOT TO KILL A GRANT APPLICATION, PART TWO

ACADEMIC SCIENTISTS AT WORK : TO FUND OR NOT TO FUND
web link
"How am I ever going to get through all of these grants? There must be more than 200 pages here. I didn't think there would be this much reading, and I only have 2 weeks before I have to send my comments in!" you exclaim to your colleague with the curly red hair. "Relax," he replies, "all you have to do is spend a day on each, and you're done. Piece of cake."
Your colleague is right about the time required to review a grant application. Careful planning is crucial if you're going to complete your reviews and still have time to get your own work done. Furthermore, it's a difficult job; because each grant application is distinct in its goals, approaches, and significance, you need a method to distinguish among the grants and rank the "apples and the oranges."
Article on the review process by Jeremy M. Boss and Susan H. Eckert appearing in Science, May 13, 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ACADEMIC SCIENTISTS' TOOLKIT
http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2004_04_29/nodoi.9200335458625575487
Includes advice on obtaining funding, as well as many othere topics.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ADVANCED ACADEMIC SKILLS : DOING RESEARCH, GETTING GRANTS, AND WRITING FOR PUBLICATION
http://catalog.lib.msu.edu/record=b7251160~S39a
Source : Academic Medicine: A Guide for Clinicians (Springer, 2006), Chapter 6, p.143-183. Access restricted to MSU faculty, staff, and students or subscribers.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

AFTER YOU'VE WRITTEN: THE APPLICATION REVIEW PROCESS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
Advice from Janet Rasey, Director, Research Funding Service, Health Sciences Schools, University of Washington. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ALL ABOUT GRANTS TUTORIALS FROM NIAID
http://funding.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/pages/aag.aspx
Practical advice for biomedical investigators, especially new ones, related to planning, writing, and applying for the basic NIH research project grant, the R01. Our advice comes from the experience of NIAID staff, including former NIH grantees, and should be considered as opinion only. Differing opinions may exist.
Current tutorials include:
(1) New Investigator Guide to NIH Funding
(2) Grant Application Basics
(3) How to Plan a Grant Application
(4) How to Write a Grant Application
(5) Focus Your Application
(6) The NIH Grant Application: Section by Section
(7) Final Steps Before Sending
(8) After Submission
(9) What to Do if You Did Not Succeed
(10) How to Manage Your Grant Award
All courtesy of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

APPROACHING A FOUNDATION
http://education.washington.edu/research/ors/documents/Approaching%20the%20Foundation.pdf
The purpose of this document is to demystify the grantmaking process to help organizations in approaching foundations in the United States. Although foundation requirements and procedures vary widely, there are some common elements that are useful to consider when approaching a foundation for funding. Many of the principles may also be useful in developing an approach to foundations in other countries. Project officers from twelve foundations participated in a professional panel review process to develop this recommended approach. They represented a full range of types of foundations, including private, family, community, and corporate organizations. The following document offers a strategy for approaching foundations and a basic framework for the first written presentation of a funding request. Advice from the Kellogg Foundation. Robert Long and Joel Orosz.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE ART OF GRANTSMANSHIP
http://www.hfsp.org/how/ArtOfGrants.htm
A nice overview of how to go about creating an academic grant proposal compiled and maintained by Jacob Kraicer, University of Toronto, School of Medicine, Department of Physiology. Posted in 1997.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE ART OF WRITING PROPOSALS
http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/7A9CB4F4-815F-DE11-BD80-001CC477EC70/
Some candid suggestions for applicants to Social Science Research Council competitions by Adam Przeworski, Department of Political Science, New York University, and Frank Salomon, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
http://chronicle.com/article/Becoming-a-Successful-Princ/66133/
Long before you make the decision to write a grant proposal for your research, you should be taking concrete steps to raise your profile in the eyes of reviewers.What does that mean? Most basically, it means preparing yourself as a scholar, a researcher, and a grant writer in ways that will strengthen the ideas behind your proposal, demonstrate that you have the wherewithal to carry out your project, and enhance your ability to communicate what reviewers are looking for. David A. Stone, Chronicle of Higher Education, July 7, 2010.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

CATALOG OF NONPROFIT LITERATURE
http://lnps.fdncenter.org/
Use the search engine to identify books and journal articles on fundraising and other topics.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW STUDY SECTION ROSTER INDEX
http://www.drg.nih.gov/committees/rosterindex.asp
Formerly called NIH Public Advisory Groups: Authority, Structure, Functions, Members. Latest edition.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

CORNELL UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF SPONSORED RESEARCH
GUIDE TO BUDGETING AND COSTING OF SPONSORED PROJECTS
http://www.osp.cornell.edu/ProposalPrep/Costing-guide.html
Prepared by the Office of Sponsored Programs, August 2006.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

CORNELL UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF SPONSORED RESEARCH
GUIDE TO PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION
http://www.osp.cornell.edu/Proposalprep/prop-guide.html
Prepared by the Office of Sponsored Programs, February 2008.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

CRAFT OF GRANT WRITING
https://grants.soe.ucsc.edu/sites/default/files/Craft%20of%20Grant%20Writing.pdf
The Texas A&M Office of Proposal Development has prepared a comprehensive workbook, 'The Craft of Grant Writing', to assist investigators in writing grants. This valuable workbook covers every phase of the proposal preparation process. 2006. still available thanks to the University of California Santa Cruz School of Engineering.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE DEAN AS FUNDRAISER
http://catalog.lib.msu.edu/record=b4896693~S1a
Today’s dean must be an effective fundraiser. Fundraising is part of the dean’s external leadership responsibilities. A dean will not be successful only by being a good fundraiser; there certainly are several other key parts of the job at which a dean also must excel. But a dean cannot really be successful if he or she cannot secure philanthropic funding. Improved financial resources are essential to improve support for faculty, students, and staff and crucial to the advancement of the institutional academic mission. A good plan for using resources is obviously needed, as is wise spending and fiscal integrity and accountability. An institution, however, cannot initiate or implement a progressive plan without the reality of renewable resources. There are limits on the traditional resources of tuition and public appropriation. Article by Kenneth C. Randall from the University of Toledo Law Review, Vol. 33, No. 1, Fall 2001.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

DEBUNKING SOME MYTHS ABOUT GRANT WRITING
http://chronicle.com/article/Debunking-Some-Myths-About/45256/
Grant writing is all about power. We write grants because they bring us prestige, programs, equipment, travel, and time. Grants free us to do the kind of research, teaching, and service that we enjoy most. So why is such an essential skill so difficult and so mysterious for so many academics? Kenneth T. Henson, Chronicle of Higher Education, June 26, 2003.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

DEVELOPING AND WRITING GRANT PROPOSALS
https://cfda.symplicity.com/downloads/CFDA_writing.pdf
The introductory chapter of the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

DEVELOPING COMPETITIVE SAMHSA GRANT APPLICATIONS
http://www.samhsa.gov/Grants/TA/index.aspx
Developing Competitive SAMHSA Grant Applications manual was created to help grantees acquire the skills and resources needed to plan, write, and prepare a competitive grant application for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) funding.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

DEVELOPING YOUR RESEARCH PLAN see HOW NOT TO KILL YOUR SCIENCE PROPOSAL, PART SIX

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL WORKSHOP
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/dissertation-proposal-resources
Writing research and grant proposals is one of the most difficult -- and unavoidable -- requirements of graduate study in the social sciences. When it comes time to write them, however, many graduate students feel left to their own devices. This site comprises a collection of tips, samples, and links. It is not meant as a class, nor a substitute for feedback from colleagues and advisors. It is merely an amiable guide meant to help you through an important phase in your academic career. Although biased in favor of "area studies" specialists and those planning to spend extended periods overseas, the content of this workshop is intended to be useful for all students hoping to conduct empirical social-scientific fieldwork. Courtesy of the University of California-Berkeley, Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

DO'S AND DON'TS FOR FELLOWSHIP APPLICANTS
http://web.archive.org/web/20131002170905/http://www.wm.edu/offices/sponsoredprograms/preaward/proposalprep/proposalprepguides/dodont/index.php
Advice from Guinevere L. Griest, Director, Division of Fellowships and Seminars, Grants Office, College of William and Mary. still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
ORD HANDBOOK FOR PROPOSAL WRITERS AND PROJECT DIRECTORS:
A GUIDE TO GETTING AND MANAGING GRANTS
http://www.ord.emich.edu/downloads/downloads_subd/handbook.pdf
Prepared by Arethea K. Helbig, Eastern Michigan University, Office of Research and Development. Chapter titles include:
(1) So You Want to Write a Grant Proposal?
(2) Commonly Asked Questions about Grant-Getting
(3) Getting Started in Grant Writing: Whys and Wherefores
(4) Finding Funding: Sources to Tap for Grant Money
(5) Writing the Proposal: Step by Step
(6) Fine-Tuning the Evaluation Section of the Grant Proposal
(7) The Money Game: Preparing the Budget and Financial Report
(8) Persuading a Prospective Funder to See Things Your Way: Writing Tips
(9) The Proposal Review: Hey, Look Me Over!
(10)Post-AwarProcedures: Hurrah! I've Got the Money! Now What Do I Do?
(11)Reporting Your Success: Tell the World How Good You Are!
(12)Appendices : including Checklists, Flow chart, Sample Timelines, Print Resources, Hints for Publishing Scholarly Writing, Spin at a Glance, and Unit Portraits
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL PROPOSAL
http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/healthresearch/guide_proposal.html
Courtesy of McMaster University.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ELEVEN STEPS TO FUNDING SUCCESS
http://web.archive.org/web/20120907063706/http://www.vpul.upenn.edu/careerservices/funding/ElevenSteps.pdf
Advice for graduate students from the University of Pennsylvania
(Last checked 07/17/14)

EPA GRANT-WRITING TUTORIAL
http://www.epa.gov/region7/citizens/care/pdf/epa_grant_writing_tutorial.pdf
This interactive software tool walks the user through the grant-writing process and helps them learn to write more competitive grants. The program includes: detailed information and tips on writing a grant proposal; how to complete a grant application package; program-specific sections on three EPA grant programs: (1) Environmental Justice, (2) Environmental Justice Through Pollution Prevention, and (3) Environmental Education; examples of good, complete grant packages; references; a glossary of terms; resources and contacts; a mock grant-writing activity where the user is able to compare their results to a successful grant application. [Also listed under Nonprofit Fundraising].
(Last checked 07/17/14)

EVALUATING FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
http://ospr.depaul.edu/html/grant/evaluating_funding_opportunities.html
Once you have located a potential grant program, you'll want to spend some time considering how well it matches your project. Begin by reading carefully through all of the information that the funder provides about the grant program, including the program description, proposal guidelines, requests for proposals, enabling legislation, lists and descriptions of recently funded projects, and evaluations of the funding program, if available. As you read, be especially aware of the following "checkpoints," each of which is accompanied by an example and some issues to consider regarding it. Advice from DePaul University.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE NCI GRANTS PROCESS BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK
see National Cancer Institute Grants Process Book....

EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDE TO WRITING GRANT PROPOSALS FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH
http://www.annals.org/cgi/reprint/142/4/274.pdf
Discusses the review process for NIH grants, advises how to impress the reviewers, provides examples of specific aims and hypotheses, and identifies major review issues (i.e., deficiencies) cited by NIH. Also provides an excellent checklist for research-based grantswriters. Article by Sharon K. Inouye and David A. Fiellin, Annals of Internal Medicine, 142 : 274-282, 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE FACTS OF THE CASE THUS FAR, see HOW NOT TO KILL A SCIENCE PROPOSAL, PART FIVE

THE FEDERAL PEER REVIEW PROCESS
http://view.fdu.edu/files/federalreviewprocess.doc
While many of us spend time schmoozing foundation officers because "people give to people," determining who gets federal money is supposed to be a much more objective process (earmarks aside). It's therefore incumbent upon us as writers to fully understand the federal review process and who will be making those decisions before wading into an elaborate and time-consuming federal proposal. The application review is the single most important component in the overall review process in deciding whether your proposal will be among those that are funded or those that are not. Article by Brian Cobb and Stacey Abatem January 18, 2006, shared by Montclair State University and Farleigh Dickinson University.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FINDING FUNDING
http://web.archive.org/web/20130425122141/http://espp.msu.edu/sustain/funding.html
Acquiring funding is an inescapable part of faculty life, and MSU tries to make it easier for you in various ways, including this compilation of resources by the Sustainable Science Program at Michigan State University. Note: This website dates from 2013 and is still available via the Internet Archive. The ideas are good, but the links may be broken.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FINDING NEW MONEY
http://web.archive.org/web/20090420053906/http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/55544/
In tough times, researchers have to look outside of government funding. Here are lesser known sources, and tips on how to get your hands on them. Article by Carol Milano appearing in the Scientist, vol. 23, issue 4, p.70. Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FUNDING AND PROPOSAL WRITING FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE FACULTY AND GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH
http://www.irss.unc.edu/content/pdf/granthandout.pdf
2000 edition available from the Internet Archive. Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
Although this guide (dated Oct. 2002) by Dr. Beverly Wiggins and Susan Gramling is written for UNC faculty and students, anyone can benefit from reviewing sections such as:
(1) Keys to identifying sources of research funding
(2) Tips for getting research funding as a new junior faculty member
(3) Keys to developing a successful proposal
(4) Usual sections of a full proposal
(5) Usual sections of a letter proposal
(6) Writing tips
(7) Critiquing your own proposal
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FUNDING FOR FAITH-BASED HIGHER EDUCATION
http://www.capitalresearch.org/pubs/pdf/x3759639169.pdf
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FUNDING STRATEGY WORKSHOP (POWERPOINT
http://research.usc.edu/files/2011/05/funding_strategy_workshop.ppt#1
Courtesy of Randolph Hall, Vice Provost for Research Advancement, University of Southern California.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FUNDRAISING IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATIONS
http://www.ericdigests.org/1997-4/foundations.htm
A Digest from the ERIC Clearinghouse for Community Colleges by Gwyer Schuyler.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

FUNDRAISING INTRODUCTORY LETTER
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
A template for faculty members interested in approaching a private foundation for funding. Indiana State University Office of Sponsored Programs. Note: Use Mozilla Firefox to retrieve article.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
PROPOSAL WRITING WORKSHOP
http://www.geosociety.org/grants/04gw_wkshp/index.htm
At the 2004 annual meeting in Denver, GSA hosted its first proposal-writing workshop aimed specifically at graduate students. This was a huge success with approximately 150 students attending. You may still download the presentation materials from these three University of Kansas presenters.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GETTIN' MONEY
http://catalog.lib.msu.edu/record=b7251161~S39a
Source : Academic Scientists at Work : Navigating the Biomedical Research Center (2nd edition, 2006). Jeremy M. Bass and Susan H. Eckert. Chapter 3 : "Gettin' Money", pp. 33-48.. Note : access restricted to MSU faculty, staff, and students.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GETTING GRANTS AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1300.aspx
Chapter 42, University of Kansas Work Group for Community Health and Development Community Toolbox, 2013. Provides advice, checklists, powerpoint, etc.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GETTING YOUR POSTDOC GRANT : IT TAKES MORE THAN JUST WRITING
web link
This is a firsthand account of my experiences, impressions, and thoughts dealing with the postdoctoral grant process. An online article by Dan McCurdy appearing in Science, September 24, 1999.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GINA SHAW'S ADVICE ON FUNDING FROM THE NIH AND BEYOND : A TWO-PART SERIES

PART ONE : WHERE THE NIH DOLLARS ARE:
FIVE FUNDING STRATEGIES FOR LEANER TIMES
still available to MSU faculty, staff, and students
The NIH budget-doubling period has come to an end, and experts foresee lean times ahead. Here are five tips to help researchers boost their chances of funding success in the coming age of austerity. Article by Gina Shaw, Genomics & Proteomics, 5.7 (Sept 1, 2005): p12. (3319 words)
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PART TWO : TAPPING ALTERNATIVE SOURCES : FUNDING BEYOND THE NIH
still available to MSU faculty, staff, and students
Part one of this series looked at the shrinking NIH budget and approaches that may help scientists sustain their research in the current lean times. This article examines the universe of other research funding, and what it can and can't offer. Article by Gina Shaw, Genomics and Proteomics 5.8 (Oct 1, 2005): p12. (3681 words)
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GOING FOR THE GOLD : SOME DOs AND DON'Ts FOR GRANT SEEKERS
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/10299/title/Going-For-The-Gold--Some-Dos-And-Don-ts-For-Grant-Seekers/
Sorry to say it, but if you are a scientist who has had a tough time obtaining federal funding to carry out your research, life is apt to become even more difficult in the next few years. Article by Liane Reif-lehrer, The Scientist 1989, 3(7):15, April 3, 1989.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT APPLICATION WRITER'S HANDBOOK (4th edition, 2005)
http://magic.lib.msu.edu:80/record=b4946740a
In this era of "tight" budgets, it takes more than just a good idea to get a grant funded. In this online book, Dr. Liane Reif-Lehrer tells you how to optimize your chances for success. She shows you, step-by-step, how to plan and develop a good proposal, explains what reviewers look for in applications, and discusses changes at NIH and NSF. The advice in this book is useful for many types of grant applications, business plans, journal articles, and research reports. Access restricted to MSU faculty, staff, and students.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOL (GRANTSAT)
http://wayback.archive.org/web/*/http://www.orsp.cmich.edu/research/documents/pdf/grantsat.pdf
Note : Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
The Grant Proposal Self Assessment Tool (GrantSAT) is an instrument for evaluating, and hence improving, the quality of proposals. It provides a number of assessment criteria for nine different aspects of a proposal, e.g., problem statement, budget, evaluation. Each criterion is rated on a scale from one to six, and using these ratings, each aspect of the proposal is given a percentage score indicating its relative strength or weakness. Guidelines are then provided on how to interpret and act upon the results of the proposal assessment. Courtesy of Central Michigan University Office of Sponsored Research Programs.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT PROPOSALS (OR GIVE ME THE MONEY!)
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/grant-proposals-or-give-me-the-money/
Advice on writing academic funding proposals by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT REVIEWS:
Series of articles by Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, Sept. 10, Sept. 24, and Oct. 8, 1999.

PART ONE: INTRODUCTION TO THE REVIEW PROCESS :
Twilight marks the end of another working day in the city. Couples stroll hand-in-hand toward cafés, bars, and restaurants, laughing as they melt into the night. You stand, heart pumping, perspiring, and bleary eyed as you watch the FedEx van pull away and round a corner. Your grant application is on its way!
For many postdoctoral scientists and junior faculty, applying for grants and awards is their first exposure to the administrative and financial worlds of scientific bureaucracy. In some cases the hours spent preparing a proposal culminate in Woody Allen-esque feelings of uncertainty, doubt, and despair regarding the fate of the application....
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PART TWO: EVOLUTION OF THE REVIEW PROCESS AT NIH AND NSF :
Just 22 years after the Declaration of Independence, President John Adams signed a law that created the Marine Hospital Service, a medical center for merchant seamen. It later evolved into the Public Health Service and, in turn, the National Institute of Health or NIH. (The Institute would become plural later.)
During both world wars, a few select institutions in New England and California conducted biomedical research, tending to focus primarily on cancer and areas of interest to the armed forces. To broaden and publicize their goals, NIH officials often paid visits to universities and schools across the United States, recruiting faculty members to submit research proposals.
One such faculty member, Maxwell Wintrobe, was chair of the department of medicine at the University of Utah. He was encouraged to apply to the NIH for research funds and appears to have timed it just right. Because the NIH had not yet implemented a formal peer review or grant administration system, NIH director Rolla Dyer personally recommended to the Congress and public health officials Wintrobe's proposal to study muscular dystrophy.
Wintrobe's institutional grant application was duly approved. In 1945, he became the first scientist at a medical school to be awarded an extramural grant from the National Institute of Health. This $100,000 award was renewed annually for 33 years, launching NIH's extramural program and bringing a total of nearly $10 million to Utah's medical school....
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PART THREE: AN INSIDER'S VIEW OF THE NIH REVIEW PROCESS :
Who's Who at the NIH, and What Do They Do?
A team of referral officers, scientific review administrators, program officers, reviewers, expert specialists, and NIH staff is responsible for handling grant applications from this point on. There are two rounds of review:
Study Sections: External reviewers determine the scientific merit of applications. They are not affiliated with an NIH institute.
Advisory Councils: Scientists from universities and research institutes, as well as other experts, approve the study section reviews and recommend to the institute director which applications to fund. They are affiliated with an NIH institute. Together, these officers select review groups, choose primary reviewers, determine which institutes or centers will fund applications, and communicate with the applicant. So a proposal should be understood by many people, not just the reviewer!...
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PART FOUR : FEDERAL REVIEW, THE NSF :
Eighty percent of their annual budget (which is just under $4 billion) supports 20,000 individual projects. In 1997, 15% of federal resources that went to fund academic R&D came from the NSF. In comparison, 60% came from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), whose sprawling 300-acre campus lies only 10 miles north of its federal counterpart.
The two federal agencies process grant proposals differently: For example, specific activities of the NIH grant review protocol are handled by different personnel, whereas at the NSF, each program officer is responsible for all steps of the review--from assigning proposals to review panels to deciding which ones to fund. Applicants find out how well they've done roughly 6 months after submission....
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANTSEEKER'S CHECKLIST
http://www.montana.edu/wwwvr/osp/GrantSeekerschklst.pdf
Advice from CD Publications.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT-SEEKING PROCESS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Excerpts from Peterson's Grants for Graduate Students shared by the University of Chicago Graduate Affairs Web Site. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT WRITING AND FUNDRAISING IN THE FIELD OF AGING
Still available from the Internet Archive
Lists sources on writing grants and raising funds for aging research and services. University of Southern California, Investigative Services Division. 1995. Updated Nov. 11, 1999. Andrus Gerontology Library. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT WRITING PROPOSAL CHECKLIST
http://www.iusb.edu/~sbres/workshop/ProposalCheck.html
Advice from the University of Indiana, South Bend, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT WRITING TIPS AND HINTS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Tips from Highline Community College. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT WRITING TIPS SHEET
http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/grant_tips.htm
Advice from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Office of Extramural Research.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANT WRITING TUTORIAL
http://www.theresearchassistant.com/tutorial/index.asp
This tutorial is designed to support new and minority drug abuse researchers who are seeking Federal funding specifically from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Much of the information is also relevant for individuals writing funding applications to other agencies of the Federal Government, using the current PHS 398 form. Courtesy of the Research Assistant : Resources for Behavioral Science Researchers.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANTS AND GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING (3rd edition)
http://eweb.slu.edu/papers2/grant01v32e.pdf
A brief handbook on seeking external resources for research based upon a compilation of original and existing information on funding opportunities and crafting a grant proposal. John O'Del, Rhode Island College Center for Management and Technology.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANTS AND GRANT WRITING
http://web.archive.org/web/20120415195626/http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_development/previous_issues/articles/0210/grants_and_grant_writing_index
A partial index to some of the many articles which have appeared in Science.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE GRANTS PROCESS : AN INTRODUCTION TO PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT
http://archive.lib.msu.edu.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/eres/msuonly/grants/IntroductiontoProposalDevelopment.pdf
Courtesy of Mary Ann Walker, MSUglobal, January 23, 2012.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GRANTSPERSONSHIP : AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL
http://wuro.wustl.edu/grantspersonship.pdf
Beth A. Fischer and Michael J. Zigmond, Survival Skills and Ethics Program, University of Pittsburgh, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

A GUIDE FOR PROPOSAL WRITING
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04016/start.htm
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04016/nsf04016_1.htm
The Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) staff at the National Science Foundation (NSF) often provide informal guidance to proposers. Staff members give workshops on proposal writing, answer questions by phone and e-mail, and talk to potential awardees at professional meetings and at NSF. The following is the essence of the advice often given to inquirers. These suggestions for improving proposals were collected from a variety of sources, including NSF Program Directors, panel reviewers, and successful grantees. Ultimately, proposals are peer reviewed in panels consisting of colleagues in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology disciplines or related fields, and the success in obtaining funding depends in great measure on reviewers' opinions and their written reviews. Topics covered include: Program Information, Review Process, Criteria for Evaluation, Before you Write, Writing the Proposal, Before sending your proposal to NSF, and Awards and Declinations.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GUIDE FOR WRITING A FUNDING PROPOSAL
http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/
A practical guide that provides both instructions on how to write a funding proposal with actual examples of a completed proposal. Designed as a tool for advanced graduate students and others to learn more about the actual proposal writing process. Provided by S. Joseph Levine, MSU Department of Agricultural and Extension Education.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GUIDE TO APPROACHING FOUNDATIONS FOR GRANT SUPPORT
Still available via the Internet Archive
This booklet is designed for Columbia University faculty and administrators seeking support for their research or academic programs. It offers some general principles and observations about the interests and preferences of foundations, and guidelines for approaching them for grant support. Gerald Fetner, Director of Foundation Relations, Office of University Development and Alumni Relations, Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, 1992. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firerfox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GUIDE TO PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE HUMANITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
http://www.hallcenter.ku.edu/hgdo/development/pdf/082002_GS_Guide.pdf
Compiled by Beverly Joyce, Bill Moseley, and Kathy Porsch, University of Kansas.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GUIDE TO PROPOSAL PLANNING AND WRITING
http://www.oema.us/files/Gude_to_Grant_Writing.pdf
Offers time-tested suggestions on how you can plan and write your grant proposals so that you can get your share of grant dollars, as well as useful questions to ask a program officer. Lynn E. Miner, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Marquette University, and author of Proposal Planning and Writing (Oryx Press, 1998).
Also listed under Nonprofit Fundraising.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING RESEARCH PROPOSALS : NAVIGATING THE ROAD TO SUCCESS
http://web.archive.org/web/20070729012946/http://www.ahprc.dal.ca/GUIDELINES.PDF
Atlantic Health Promotion Research Center, August 1999, 28pp. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
HOW TO WRITE A FELLOWSHIP PROPOSAL
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE HOLY GRAIL : IN PURSUIT OF THE DISSERTATION PROPOSAL
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/process-parameters
Presents a number of issues pertaining to research design and proposal writing and to lay out in broad terms a number of concerns and knotty problems that enter into the long and complicated process of framing, designing and conducting a researchable project... Advice from Michael Watts, University of California Berkeley, Institute of International Studies. Part of the Dissertation Proposal Workshop.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW NOT TO KILL A GRANT APPLICATION : ADVICE FROM SCIENCE MAGAZINE

Part One: MURDER MOST FOUL
Web link
As the sultry murder-mystery editor Miss Fromsett told private eye Philip Marlowe in the '40s classic The Lady in the Lake, "People who write usually don't know the facts, and people who know the facts usually can't write." Her characterization of mystery writers could easily apply to scientists preparing grant applications: They know the facts, but they have trouble writing and selling their ideas. In the movie, Marlowe's attempt at crime writing was a success because he blended real-life facts with intrigue and style--the perfect ingredients for bestsellers, but also the essential elements of competitive grant applications.
Grappling with grant applications at your desk is as central to scientific success as is wrestling with experimental conundrums at the bench. In the fight for research dollars, grant writing can make or break a research career no matter how good or innovative a scientist's ideas are. From inexperienced graduate students and struggling postdocs to exultant new faculty members and worldly-wise senior investigators, competing for grants occurs at all stages of academic research careers. But many candidates falter, making needless mistakes that tarnish potentially award-winning applications: Research plans are overambitious, incoherent, or too diffuse, for example. Learn to address these problems, and your grant applications stand a good chance of receiving a favorable review. Online article by Vid Mohan-Ram, appearing in Science, January 7, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

Part Two: ABSTRACT KILLERS
web link
"We must confess that your proposal seems less like science and more like science fiction," declares an executive in Contact, the movie about scientists who detect alien transmissions in outer space. Grant reviewers may confess the same of application abstracts that are filled with wonderful ideas but lack practical, nuts-and-bolts details. A good abstract is like a postcard-sized reprint of a famous work of art: It captures and illustrates the entire research picture without leaving the reader puzzled or confused.
In their efforts to spruce up and dress the body of the research plan, many grant applicants--postdocs and faculty alike--often fail to include essential pieces of the abstract, such as research data and methods. Because the abstract is the first glimpse a reader gets of an application's worth, such oversights can raise unnecessary questions, and may even create the impression that the research plan itself may be incomplete. The key to designing a winning grant application is to start off with a well-rounded, concise summary of your whole application: To accomplish that in a few hundred words, however, takes skill. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, January 28, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

Part Three : SO WHAT?
web link
For many young scientists, the research plan itself can appear to be an alien landscape! This article provides a head-first plunge into the nitty-gritty of your actual research plan: How to structure it, what reviewers are looking for and what irritates them the most. An online article by Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, February 11, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

Part Four : LOST AT SEA
web link
When Britain's 18th century Board of Longitude offered £20,000 to anyone who could accurately tell the time at sea, plans and proposals flooded in from all over the world--from Royal Astronomers to novice watchmakers. A major problem, however, was that many contenders never considered the actual conditions of the contest, and so not one proposal aroused the board's interest for over 15 years! Unfortunately, today's review boards still face lackluster proposals from researchers who continue to make the same mistakes that doomed their seafaring predecessors: The science is mediocre, sentences ramble, there are no headings, figures are unclear, sections are disorganized, and the writing is uninspired. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram, appearing in Science, February 25, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

Part Five : THE FACTS OF THE CASE THUS FAR
web link
"Facts, Hercule, facts! Nothing matters but the facts. Without them the science of criminal investigation is nothing more than a guessing game." Inspector Clouseau's words ring true as much for scientific investigation as they do for legal proceedings--especially because research grants can prove to be as slippery to nail down as the Pink Panther. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, May 26, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

Part Six : DEVELOPING YOUR RESEARCH PLAN
web link
So, after whetting the reviewers' appetites with a well-rounded introduction and some logical (and testable!) hypotheses, it's time to let them sink their teeth into your research plan. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, August 11, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO ENHANCE A GRANT PROPOSAL
Still available via the Internet Archive.
It is important for an applicant to become familiar with eligibility requirements and other criteria related to the organization and grant program from which assistance is sought. Applicants should remember that the basic requirements, application forms, information, deadlines, and procedures will vary for each grant maker. Since funding information changes, applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the funding source before preparing any application. Also reviews the different parts of a proposal, with examples. Courtesy of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO GET A BITE OF NIH'S BILLION DOLLAR FUNDING PIE
web link
"The role of the National Institutes of Health [NIH] is to give away $20 billion a year for research." But it is your role as an applicant to understand how the NIH dispenses these dollars--before you dash off your application. Winning a share of those research dollars is a competitive process. And although the quality of your research plan is crucial to your project's success, there are a number of non-research-related, practical things you can do to make sure your application stays on track and, in so doing, improve your chances of getting it funded. Includes pictures of incoming grant applications piled up at the loading dock. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram, Science, Oct. 13, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO GET A GRANT FROM NEH
http://www.neh.gov/news/humanities/2008-07/GrantWriting.html
For people getting started with grant-writing, this article covers a number of basic ideas clearly. Article by Meredith Hindley from Humanities, July/August 2008, Vol. 29/Number 4.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR SCORE WHEN SUBMITTING A GRANT PROPOSAL
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
A guide by David Hemenway, University of Vermont Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. February 13, 1997. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO WIN AN ENVIRONMENTAL FELLOWSHIP (OUR GUIDE TO FOCUSING YOUR MONEY HUNT...)
Internet Archive Link
You've got drive, you've got ambition, and you have a great idea for a research project. So what's missing? Oh, yeah… money! How are you going to pay for grad school and your research ideas? Is it really possible that some company might just give you the money?
The answer is "Yes! But..."
We're referring to the amazing, but elusive, Fellowship Award, which is basically a grant that is used to fund either a graduate student's education or a research project.
These highly competitive awards are not for everyone; read on to discover whether a fellowship is right for you... This article focuses on obtaining graduate fellowships for research, but the tips here could help those who just want to fund their education, too.
Article by Carol Ruhl, Environmental Education Specialist, EnvironmentalSchools.org, March 26, 2004. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO WRITE A RESEARCH PROJECT GRANT APPLICATION
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/write_grant_doc.htm
This document is intended to complement existing documents found on the National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases webpages. This document has been customized and updated for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other neuroscience granting agencies. Although the advice provided in this document is relevant to all research grants, it is geared toward the traditional research project grant (R01). Research Project Grants support a focused research program conducted by a principal investigator with or without collaborators, postdoctoral trainees, graduate students and/or technicians. These applications must be submitted electronically via Grants.gov, using the SF424(R&R) application.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO WRITE A WINNING PROPOSAL AND GET THOSE GRANTS!
http://trc.virginia.edu/Publications/Grant_Writing.htm
A beginner's guide to the proposal writing and submission process at the University of Virginia by Jennifer Tyler, UVA Teaching Resource Center.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

HOW TO WRITE AN NIH GRANT APPLICATION
web link
The culmination of months of work is distilled into your NIH grant application--that bundle of paper that quickly becomes your sole focus and takes over your entire world. But the National Institutes of Health is the largest funder of academic research in the U.S., and so to NIH officials, YOUR precious package is only one of over 40,000 applications they receive every year--a single fish in a school of thousands. Given the competition, you really can't let silly mistakes ruin your chances. Article by Vid Mohan-Ram, Science, June 23, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

I CAN'T BELIEVE THEY DIDN'T LIKE IT!
web link
"What do they mean, it's 'too ambitious'? How do they think I am going solve the Big Problem if I'm not ambitious? Who are these idiots? They aren't qualified to review my work! None of the experiments they say we need to do will tell us anything! They are just giving us busy work!"
Whew! Wasn't it a relief to get that out of your system? If you have made statements like these, you know that within a few minutes, or days, you will collect your thoughts and decide on a reasonable response to that negative grant review or rejected manuscript.
Almost everyone in science has received a nonfundable grant score or had a paper rejected, usually both. If this is your first experience with such a rejection, congratulations and welcome to the club! The key now is to know how to move forward, to understand the appropriate roles of the reviewer and the reviewed, and to determine how to respond to critiques so that you get that grant funded, eventually, or that paper accepted. In Part 1 of this series we will discuss the ins and outs of dealing with manuscript peer review. Part 2 will focus on responding to grant critiques.
Article by Jeremy M. Boss and Susan H. Eckert appearing in Science, September 12, 2003.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

I CAN'T BELIEVE THEY DIDN'T LIKE IT! (PART II : GRANT PROPOSALS)
web link
"Can you believe this summary statement? They said my grant proposal was too preliminary, not focused, too ambitious, just a descriptive survey, a large fishing expedition, did not have an adequate animal model, did not provide a clear rationale, and was viewed with a low level of enthusiasm. And that's just in the opening summary paragraph! There are four more pages of specific comments. What am I going to do?"
The good news is that everyone has received some of these comments in their grant-proposal critiques. The tough part for the scientist is to determine how to respond so that the proposal is in better shape -- much better shape -- when it is resubmitted. This essay will discuss how to evaluate and respond to your review and provide ways to seek the best advice for improving your grant application. We start with the role of the reviewer because your understanding of the reviewer's objectives will provide you with a reference point for your response and resubmission. The discussion that follows uses the National Institutes of Health (NIH) system as example, as this is the largest source of biomedical research funding. But the general advice applies to the peer-review systems of other federal agencies and those of private foundations.
Article by Jeremy M. Boss and Susan H. Eckert appearing in Science, December 12, 2003.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROGRAMS
PROPOSAL WRITING TIPS
http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/writingtips.html
Includes sections on organizing a proposal, putting your idea into a project format, and preparing a full proposal. January 10, 2001.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

LETTER PROPOSALS
http://grantspace.org/Tools/sample-documents/%28sample_doc_cat_id%29/2/%28sample_doc_cat_name%29/Letter+Proposals
Advice from the Foundation Center Portal : GrantSpace.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE LIFE CYCLE OF AN NIH GRANT APPLICATION (SLIDE SHOW)
Slide Show
Courtesy of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

LOCATING FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG INVESTIGATORS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Advice from Sherif Afifi, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Co-Director of Cardiothoracic ICU, Yale University School of Medicine. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

LOST AT SEA, see HOW NOT TO KILL A GRANT PROPOSAL, PART FOUR

THE MAKING OF A SUCCESSFUL PROPOSAL
http://illinois.edu/cms/3389/artwritingprpsal_makingsccsflprpsl.pdf
As you prepare to set pen to paper, keep in mind the following: Many graduate students apply for funds from foundations, agencies, and the University. You are not alone in having an interesting, worthy project to be funded or in wanting to travel to broaden your experience and contacts. But just wanting to go to Spain or New York or Tahiti is not enough to persuade a review committee. Nor is simply being a University of California Berkeley graduate student who happens to need funds (even desperately) for the next year. Instead, you are going to have to convince the reviewers that your project is worthwhile, unique, and that you are the person to carry it out. Advice from the University of California, Berkeley, The Graduate, Spring 1987. Still available thanks to University of Illinois.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MAKING THE RIGHT MOVES: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT FOR POSTDOCS AND NEW FACULTY
http://www.hhmi.org/resources/labmanagement/mtrmoves_download.html
Practical advice from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Howard Hughes Medical Institute. 2nd edition, 2006. Be sure to check out chapter 9 on getting funded.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MECHANICS OF GRANT WRITING (POWERPOINT)
http://acosoc.org/student/extra_docs/doc_files/ASA_GrantWriting.pdf
Acoustical Society of America, June 7, 2006.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MEDICAL SCHOOL APPLICATION ADVICE
http://www.accepted.com/medical/amcasessay.aspx
Personal statements. Secondary Essays. Letters of Recommendation. Low Stats. Non-science background. Age. Residency. Research experience. These are just a few of the topics covered in this treasure trove of articles and an email course on medical school admissions. Help yourself. They're here to help you get Accepted.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MICHIGAN COMMON APPLICATION FORM
https://www.michiganfoundations.org/resources/common-grant-application-form
Many Michigan foundations have adopted a common application form for grant seekers to use when applying for funding. Courtesy of the Council of Michigan Foundations.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
CONTRACT AND GRANT ADMINISTRATION OFFICE
GENERAL PROPOSAL AND PROJECT INFORMATION
http://www.cga.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=aQBkAD0AMQA0ADYA
Provides information on processing proposals, MSU indirect costs, contacts, and accounts.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROGRAMS
PROPOSAL PREPARATION GUIDE
https://osp.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=aQBkAD0AMQAyADgA
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
GRANTS AND RELATED RESOURCES
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/index.htm
An extensive compilation of resources.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

THE MOST COMMON ERRORS MADE IN RESEARCH PROPOSALS AND APPLICATIONS
http://www.indiana.edu/~gradgrnt/publications/the-most-common-errors-made-in-research-proposals-and-applications/
Courtesy of the Indiana University Office of Research and University Graduate School.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

MURDER MOST FOUL, see HOW NOT TO KILL A GRANT APPLICATION, PART ONE

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)
GRANTS PROCESS AND ADMINISTRATION
http://www3.cancer.gov/admin/gab/2005GPB/GPB05-LowRes.pdf
Also called "Everything You Wanted to Know About the NCI Grants Process But Were Afraid to Ask". Revised August 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE
QUICK GUIDE FOR GRANT APPLICATIONS
http://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/extra/extdocs/gntapp.pdf
This is a helpful breakdown of common mistakes made during the composition of PHS 398 grant applications (used by the majority of NIH grant applicants). Each section--from the face page to animal care details--includes a table of mistakes that applicants commonly make when submitting applications to the NCI. A good summary of "grant writing tips" at the end provides more useful information. 2010.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES
SAMPLE R01 APPLICATIONS AND SUMMARY STATEMENTS
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/pages/appsamples.aspx
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE
GRANT APPLICATION AND REVIEW INFORMATION FAQ
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ep/faq.html
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, see NSF...

NEW INVESTIGATOR GUIDE TO NIH FUNDING
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/pages/newpiguide.aspx
Outlines strategies for gaining an NIH grant and explains basic funding concepts and processes to new and would-be principal investigators. This document gives new and would-be principal investigators an overview of funding and grantsmanship concepts and provides strategies for gaining an NIH grant.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NIAID R01 INVESTIGATOR RESOURCES
http://funding.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/pages/R01.aspx
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NIH GRANT APPLICATION BASICS
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_basics.htm
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NIH GRANTS PROCESS AT A GLANCE
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grants_process.htm#process
(Last checked 07/17/14)

The NIH R01 TOOL KIT
web link
If you're a scientist doing research that's directly related to human health, you need to know your way around the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Every young biomedical scientist seeks NIH grants; indeed, the first R01 is a milestone in every biomedical researcher's career.
Unlike most other guides, this one isn't static. In the coming months and years, we, the writers and editors of Science Careers, will incorporate changes in NIH procedures, new funding opportunities, and so on, and will keep it evolving as we learn more and get better advice from new sources. We'll keep refining it to reflect input from you and others.
So bookmark this page. Use it as your starting point whenever you start to prepare a new NIH research project grant (RPG), and check back when you have a draft in hand. This guide will be useful throughout the process of preparing and submitting grant applications.
Advice from the editors of Science, July 27, 2007.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NIH : STRATEGY FOR NIH FUNDING
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/strategy/pages/default.aspx
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NO MERCY FROM THE MARGIN POLICE : WHEN THE FEDS SAY ONE INCH, THEY MEAN ONE INCH
http://web.archive.org/web/20131013043304/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/No%20Mercy%20from%20the%20Margin%20Police.pdf
When writing a grant, follow the instructions to the letter. Advice from Suan Compo, the Grantsmanship Center, 2004. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NSF GRANT PROPOSAL GUIDE
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=gpg
Provides guidance on submitting a NSF proposal. After January 2009, use the next resource.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NSF GRANT PROPOSAL GUIDE
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf09_1/gpg_index.jsp
(Last checked 07/17/14)

NSF PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND AWARD ADMINISTRATION : FAQS
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/gpg/faqs.pdf
36 pages of questions and answers.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ON THE ART OF WRITING PROPOSALS
http://www.ssrc.org/workspace/images/crm/new_publication_3/%7B7a9cb4f4-815f-de11-bd80-001cc477ec70%7D.pdf
Some candid suggestions for applications to Social Science Research Council competions. Adam Przeworski and Frank Salomon. 1995.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ONE PROGRAM OFFICER'S CANDID TIPS FOR GRANTSEEKERS
http://web.archive.org/web/20121224075626/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/One%20Program%20Officer%27s%20Candid%20Tips%20for%20Grantseekers.pdf
Thinking about asking a private foundation for research support? "When you approach a foundation, don't just look for areas of interest. Try to find the key leaders. One of Joel's Laws of Foundations is that nobody gives grants to organizations. You give grants to people because you believe in them, think they can handle that money and do a great job with it." Dr. Joel Orosz (The Grantsmanship Center Magazine). Also don't forget to contact the MSU Development Office to get permission before submitting a grant proposal to private foundations. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

OVERVIEW OF FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES
https://research.usc.edu/files/2011/05/Fifth-Edition-Summer-2011-Federal-Funding-Opportunities-for-Social-Sciences-and-Humanities-Final1.pdf
Prepared by Lewis-Burke Associates LLC, August 5, 2011, for the University of Southern California
(Last checked 07/17/14)

A PEDIATRICIAN'S GUIDE TO PROPOSAL WRITING
http://web.archive.org/web/20111208190357/http://aap.org/commpeds/resources/Pediatrician_Guide_to_Proposal_Writing.pdf
This Guide is a tool to help pediatricians develop grant proposals for community-based child health programs. It contains information on types of grantmarkers; proposal writing and the solicitation process; components of a proposal; common proposal writing mistakes; examples of proposals and budgets; and resources on fundraising and proposal writing. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY
FACULTY GUIDE TO SPONSORED PROGRAMS
http://web.archive.org/web/20021202140925/
http://infoserv.rttonet.psu.edu/spa/fac-guid.htm

Describes Penn State University practices affecting the solicitation of grant and contract funds. It is not intended to be an offical statement of University Policy or a comprehensive manual, but a readily accessible guide to get faculty started in the pursuit of sponsored support. In summary, the proposal process all comes down to five simple steps:

It is to be hoped that the last step refers to finding the people you need to help you manage your new grant. But if not, then it simply means finding the people who can help you try again! We hope this booklet will help you create a successful proposal. Penn State University Office of Sponsored Programs. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PERSUASIVE PROPOSAL WRITING
http://web.archive.org/web/20060213233427/http://www.biu.ac.il/RA/www/rserch/writing/write1.html
Prepared by Yosef Mackler, Research Grants Editor, Research Authority, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR WRITING PROPOSALS
http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~ebrown/pracguid.htm
Tips from Alice Reid, Instructor of English and Educational Technology, Delaware Technical and Community College, Wilmington Campus.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PREPARING A GRANT PROPOSAL AT INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY
http://web.archive.org/web/20011119183608/
http://web.indstate.edu/OOR/resource/prepgrnt.htm#funding

Provides tips that would be of use to faculty anywhere. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PREPARING A SUCCESSFUL FELLOWSHIP OR GRANT APPLICATION
http://web.archive.org/web/20130904163634/http://www.oah.org/pubs/nl/2009aug/chavez.html
Navigating academia successfully requires a network of reliable mentors, colleagues, and friends who can provide sound advice and support. Nowhere is mentorship more valuable than in the process of applying for grants and fellowships. We know the process is challenging and competitive, yet it serves as a tremendous learning experience in shaping one’s research trajectory. Equally important, applying opens the possibility of landing a coveted prize and promises to provide valuable resources for one’s career. Knowing how to identify appropriate grants and fellowships, address all components of the application effectively, and maximize your chances for success can help ensure a generative experience, even if you do not ultimately obtain a grant or fellowship. A recent stint evaluating applications for a national fellowship program taught us that a significant number of applicants, especially those early in their careers, receive little, if any, advice about how to do this. The dearth of such mentorship motivated us to compile a few words of advice aimed at improving and, hopefully, making for winning proposals. Advice from Ernesto Chávez, Miroslava Chávez-García, and Luis Alvarez. Organization of American Historians, OAH Newsletter 37 (August 2009). Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PREPARING AND SUBMITTING A STANDARD NSF PROPOSAL VIA FASTLANE
https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/a1/newstan.htm
Instructions provided the MSU Office of Contract and Grant Administration. Sept. 2004.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

A PROPOSAL WRITING SHORT COURSE
http://fdncenter.org/learn/shortcourse/prop1.html
A short overview provided by the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING : STAGES AND STRATEGIES
http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~ebrown/infobr3.htm
Prepared by William H. Matchett, University of Minnesota,1997, and mounted on a web page by Georgia Perimeter College.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING : THE BUSINESS OF SCIENCE
hhttp://www.sci.utah.edu/~macleod/grants/sanders-grants.pdf
Article by Wendy Sanders, Whitaker Foundation, via the University of Utah.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

PURDUE UNIVERSITY
EPA GRANT WRITING TUTORIAL
http://www.epa.gov/region07/citizens/care/pdf/epa_grant_writing_tutorial.pdf
(Last checked 07/17/14)

RESEARCHASSISTANT (theresearchasssistant.com)
http://www.theresearchassistant.com/index.asp
The ResearchAssistant is a comprehensive source of tips, tools, and information to navigate the world of behavioral science research, from formulating your question to getting your proposal funded. If you need to collect data, assemble a research proposal team, choose a statistical method, or select a journal for publishing an article, TheResearchAssistant has the resources to help you make it happen. Be sure to visit the Grant Writing Tutorial section.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

ROANOKE COLLEGE
ACADEMIC GRANTS PROPOSAL TIPS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
This is a brief overview of what to consider when writing a proposal for external funding for your research, writing, sabbaticals, etc. It can serve as a guide for new writers of proposals, or a list of reminders for those with more experience. While it was designed with scientists in mind, the guidelines are general enough to pertain to applications in the humanities or any field. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE GRANT - RESEARCH PROPOSAL
A SIMULATED PROPOSAL FOR : A COMMUNITY-BASED MOTHERS AND INFANTS CENTER
http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/propone.htm
Courtesy of Joe Levine, Michigan State University, Dept. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education and Communication Systems.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL: AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION
http://www.apsanet.org/content_9224.cfm
a few sample winning Small Research Grant proposals.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : FULBRIGHT
MaANUFACTURING IDENTITIES IN LOWLAND BOLIVIA BY NANCY POSTERO
http://iis.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/Manufacturing%20Identies_Postero%2C%20Nancy.pdf
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : FULBRIGHT
DECENTRALIZATION AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN LATIN AMERICA : DEEPENING OR DOOMING DEMOCRACY? BY BENJAMIN GOLDFRANK
http://iis.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/Decentralization_Goldfrank%2C%20Ben.pdf
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES
POMPEII FORUM PROJECT
http://web.archive.org/web/20070829191957/http://pompeii.virginia.edu/pompeii/neh/neh.html
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL: NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY (NIST)
http://math.nist.gov/~DLozier/projects/ALMMF/proposal/proposal.pdf
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL: NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
http://gadfly.igc.org/ecology/proposal.htm
“Implications of Disequilibrium Ecology for Environmental Ethics and Policy”. Prepared by Ernest Partidge, University of California-Riverside.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
A "NEW" ENVIRONMENTALISM OR AGRIBUSINESS AS USUAL BY JULIE GUTHMAN PROJECT SUMMARY
http://iis.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/A%20New%20Environmentalism_Guthman%2C%20Julie.pdf
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
PUTTING NETWORKS IN THEIR PLACE : LOCAL LINKAGES, NATIONAL NETWORKS AND LAND REFORM IN BRAZIL BY WENDY WOLFORD
http://iis.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/Putting%20Networks%20in%20their%20Place_Wolford%2C%20Wendy.pdf
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY : THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE WISE USE MOVEMENT BY JAMES MCCARTHY
http://iis.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/The%20Good%2C%20the%20Bad%2C%20and%20the%20Ugly_McCarthy%2C%20James.pdf
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Institute of International Studies.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL : NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP ESSAY
http://www.alexhunterlang.com/nsf-fellowship
Advice from Alex Lang, Boston University.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSAL: TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
http://www.4grants.net/Grant%20Writing%20Proposal.pdf
Seeking funding to pay for an online grant writing course.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSALS FOR THE SCIENCES
http://web.archive.org/web/20070729043016/http://aaa.nevada.edu/proposals.html
Courtesy of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SCHOLARLY PURSUITS : A GUIDE TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DURING THE GRADUATE YEARS
http://www.gsas.harvard.edu/images/stories/pdfs/scholarly_pursuits.pdf?phpMyAdmin=6b9c477e53d3t291967f4
With sample application essays, fellowship proposals, curriculum vitae and cover letters from candidates in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University. 2007, 9th edition. Compiled by Cynthia Verba.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SECRETS TO SCORING BIG MONEY GRANTS FOR INNOVATIVE, OUT-OF-THE-BOX RESEARCH
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/30812/title/Rewards-of-Risk/
Includes a sampler of alternative high-risk funders and tips for writing grants. For the full article, see Megan Scudellari, "Rewards of Risk : Secrets to scoring big money grants for innovative, out-of-the-box research", The Scientist, February 1, 2011.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SEEKING FUNDING: A MANUAL FOR FACULTY IN THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION
http://www.ats.edu/LeadershipEducation/documents/grants/Tupper-SeekingFunding.pdff
Courtesy of the Association of Theological Schools.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SO WHAT? see HOW NOT TO KILL A GRANT APPLICATION, PART THREE

SOME REASONS PROPOSALS FAIL
http://www.montana.edu/wwwvr/osp/reasons.html
Courtesy of Montana State University.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY (TEXAS)
PROPOSAL COMPONENTS
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Compiled by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

STEPS TO SUCCESSFUL GRANT WRITING
http://lrs.ed.uiuc.edu/K12/ARRTI/Grant-Writing-Outline.html
Prepared by Marilyn Sinclair, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS:
HOW TO WRITE A CANCER CAM GRANT
http://www.cancer.gov/cam/attachments/howtowrite.pdf
As cancer patients continue to explore alternative treatments and practices, the need for reliable scientific data increases. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) remains devoted to the rigorous investigation of potential treatments and modalities in the prevention and treatment of cancer and its symptoms, whether the source is unconventional or unexpected. Rigorous scientific investigations in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) can and should be conducted. Unfortunately, the development of competitive research proposals in cancer CAM and securing federal funding is often challenging. Cancer CAM applications to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) must meet all the general criteria required of any application. In addition, competitive applications are successful at addressing some of the challenges specific to cancer CAM topics. The OCCAM has developed a document that not only compiles information from existing NIH grant writing resources, it highlights some of the issues unique to CAM and CAM related research areas. Many of the issues raised by review committees and presents some of the potential solutions for applicants.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

STRATEGY FOR NIH FUNDING
http://www.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/strategy/pages/default.aspx
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SUBMITTING A GRANT PROPOSAL : RISKS, BENEFITS, AND HOW TO SUCCEED
http://www.hallcenter.ku.edu/hgdo/development/pdf/SubmittingGrantProposal.shtml
This introduction to grant development in the humanities is written for University of Kansas faculty members and graduate students at the beginning of their professional research careers. The tutorial is divided into the following sections:
(1) Scholars and the Grant Application Process
(2) The Risks and Benefits of Grant Proposal Submission
(3) The "Theology" of Grant Proposal Writing
(4) Frank Advice on Writing Research Grant Proposals in the Humanities
(5) Abstract or Summary
(6) The Proposal Narrative
(7) About Your Audience
(8) Typical Review Panel Criteria
(9) Identifying References and Recommendations
(10)The Curriculum Vitae
Maria Carlson, Director, Center for Russian and East European Studies, The University of Kansas.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

SUCCESSFUL GRANT WRITING WORKSHOP
Part 1 : Grant Writing for Humanities, Archives, and Library Science
Part 2 : Grant Writing for Social Sciences
Part 3 : Grant Writing for Sciences
Part 4 : Grant Writing for Biomedical and Health Sciences
On March 25th, 2010 ten Simmons University faculty members shared their experiences and advice via a "Successful Grant Proposal Writing" panel that was sponsored by the Provost's Office, and organized by professor Rong Tang of GSLIS, with the assistance from the Office of Sponsored Programs.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TAPPING ALTERNATIVE SOURCES : FUNDING BEYOND THE NIH, see GINA SHAW'S ADVICE ON FUNDING FROM THE NIH AND BEYOND : A TWO-PART SERIES

TEN COMMANDMENTS OF PRIVATE FOUNDATION GRANT PROPOSALS
web link
Panelist John Hurley, associate vice president for the MacArthur Foundation, explains the benefits of applying to private organizations for research funds for an audience of graduate students, postdocs, and administrators. Article written by Vid Mohan-Ram, Science, March 10, 2000.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TEN SIMPLE RULES FOR GETTING GRANTS
http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.0020012
At the present time, US funding is frequently below 10% for a given grant program. Today, more than ever, we need all the help we can get in writing successful grant proposals. We hope you find these rules useful in reaching your research career goals. Advice from Philip E. Bourne and Leo M. Chalupa, PLoS Computational Biology 2(2), 2006.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TEN WAYS TO WRITE A BETTER GRANT
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/tenways.htm
Advice for faculty interested in applying for NIH grants. Article by Alison Snyder appearing in The Scientist, Volume 21, Issue 1, Page 71.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIME MANAGEMENT 101 FOR GRANT APPLICANTS
web link
Are you on the brink of scientific stardom as a faculty member but need extra funding? Are you beginning a postdoctoral project and need start-up assistance? Stop! Before you get carried away in a mad dash while writing your dream proposal, be aware that preparing a good grant application requires more than just a slick sale of scientific ideas. Advice from Vid Mohan-Ram appearing in Science, October 8, 1999.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIPS FOR APPLYING TO PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS FOR GRANT MONEY
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
another web link
A short article by Peter J. Feibelman, University of Texas-Houston Health Sciences Center.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIPS FOR NEW NIH GRANT APPLICANTS
http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Research/Application/Tips.htm
Advice from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL GRANT WRITING
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/grantwriting.htm
Helpful information for preparing a Federal research grant application, including: 1) How to Write a Research Project Grant Application; 2) Common Mistakes in NIH Applications; 3) Writing a Grant Application: A "Technical" Checklist; 4) Links to More Information on Writing Grants 5) General Information and Tools from the NIH Office of Extramural Research Website. Courtesy of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIPS ON PROPOSAL AND GRANT WRITING
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Linda Martinez, Engineering Library, Duke University, provides an overview for the ASEE Conference, June 1998. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TIPS ON WRITING GRANT/FELLOWSHIP PROPOSALS (AND OTHER RESEARCH PROPOSALS)
http://web.archive.org/web/20130514175612/http://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/pubs/studentlife/bucholtzgrantproposaltips.pdf
Advice from Mary Bucholtz, Department of Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TOP TEN WAYS TO GET FUNDED
http://faculty.ed.uiuc.edu/j-levin/top-10-funding.html
Compiled by Jim Levin, College of Education, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Revised 2003.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

TOP TEN WAYS TO MAKE YOUR FOUNDATION PROPOSAL A SUCCESS
http://education.washington.edu/research/ors/documents/Top%2010%20Ways.pdf
Advice from Sarah Nicholson, University of Washington, Office of Development.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH PROPOSALS
http://www.tgci.com/sites/default/files/pdf/Understanding%20Research%20Proposals_0.pdf
While there are important differences between grant proposals for research and grant proposals for programs, there are also many parallels. Grantsmanship Center trainer Charles R. Putney outlines the major components of a standard research proposal, and he explains how they relate to similar components of a program proposal.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNDERSTANDING THE FEDERAL REVIEW PROCESS
http://www.bmuse.net/muse-ings_fedrevprocess.html?a=3055&z=16
The length of the federal review process has always frustrated my clients and me. That silence following the deadline is so profound. This is how I explain it to them.... Article by Sarah S. Brophy, February 16, 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
DISSERTATION PROPOSAL WORKSHOP
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/dissertation-proposal-resources
Writing research and grant proposals is one of the most difficult -- and unavoidable -- requirements of graduate study in the social sciences. When it comes time to write them, however, many graduate students feel left to their own devices. This website is designed to help you navigate the hazards this process entails and along the way provides a collection of a collection of tips, samples, and links. Although biased in favor of "area studies" specialists and those planning to spend extended periods overseas, the content of this workshop is intended to be useful for all students hoping to conduct empirical social-scientific fieldwork.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
THE HOLY GRAIL : IN PURSUIT OF THE DISSERTATION PROPOSAL
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/process-parameters
Presents a number of issues pertaining to research design and proposal writing and to lay out in broad terms a number of concerns and knotty problems that enter into the long and complicated process of framing, designing and conducting a researchable project... Advice from Michael Watts, University of California Berkeley, Institute of International Studies. Part of the Dissertation Proposal Workshop.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
NUTS AND BOLTS
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/nuts-bolts
This section of the site is designed as a practical guide to the proposal's various parts, including theory, research question, research design, background & history, budgeting, and concepts & terminology. You should first look at the suggested timeline indicating many of the activities that you will need to undertake in preparing to submit your proposal on time. While you may compress or extend this timeline, remember, you cannot begin too early. Part of the Dissertation Proposal Workshop.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
STYLE
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/style
You have only one chance with most grant reviewers, so the way you present your ideas is central to the success of your proposal. The people who read your proposal will sometimes be reviewing hundreds of others and are likely to be overburdened with other projects as well. Your goal is for the reviewers to be able to understand your research purpose and judge its relevance and importance without having to work to do so. Regardless of your project's intellectual merits, a proposal that puzzles reviewers with complex syntax, ill-defined terms, or inelegant prose is not likely to win a favorable rating. Without style, your proposal's substance is likely to be ignored. With this in mind, the central criteria on clarity, tone, coherence and presentation, listed below, may help you make your proposal as lucid and explicit as possible. Part of the Dissertation Proposal Workshop.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
EXAMPLES
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/examples

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
RESOURCES
http://iis.berkeley.edu/content/resources
All too often, ethical considerations are overlooked in proposal writing and research. Every discipline and institution has its own standards of appropriate methods and protocols, and it is your responsibility to be aware of those that apply to you. To help you along in this process, we have included a number of the major disciplinary associations' ethical guidelines for conducting empirical research. Be warned, many universities also require you to submit detailed research or ethical protocols for approval before you go into the field.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION AND COMPLIANCE
FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEW AND YOUNG FACULTY
http://www.spo.berkeley.edu/Fund/newfaculty.html
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
GRANT BULLETIN
https://research.uiowa.edu/grantbulletin/index.php
Up-to-date funding opportunities
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
PRIVATE FUNDING : ARTS AND HUMANITIES
http://dsp.research.uiowa.edu/private-funding-arts-humanities
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
PRIVATE FUNDING : INTERNATIONAL
http://dsp.research.uiowa.edu/private-funding-international
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
PRIVATE FUNDING : MISCELLANEOUS
http://dsp.research.uiowa.edu/private-funding-miscellaneous-interests
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
RESEARCH OFFICE
PROPOSAL WRITING GUIDE
http://www.pitt.edu/~offres/proposal/propwriting.html
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
RESEARCH OFFICE
PROPOSAL WRITING: SELECTED WEB SITES
http://www.pitt.edu/~offres/proposal/propwriting/websites.html
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND
SUBMITTING A GRANT ADVICE
http://grants.richmond.edu/submit/index.html
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
OVERVIEW OF FEDERAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES
https://research.usc.edu/files/2011/05/Fifth-Edition-Summer-2011-Federal-Funding-Opportunities-for-Social-Sciences-and-Humanities-Final1.pdf
Prepared by Lewis-Burke Associates LLC, August 5, 2011
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
GRANTS AND FUNDING INFORMATION SERVICE
Funding Resources By Subject Area
Funding Resources for Special Populations
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Grants Information Collection
http://grants.library.wisc.edu/
(Last checked 07/17/14)

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, RIVER FALLS
OFFICE OF GRANTS AND RESEARCH
http://www.uwrf.edu/grants/
(Last checked 07/17/14)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
OFFICE OF EXTRAMURAL RESEARCH
HOW TO PREPARE A SUCCESSFUL GRANT APPLICATIONS AND MORE (PODCASTS)
http://grants.nih.gov/podcasts/All_About_Grants/index.htm
The Office of Extramural Research (OER) presents conversations with NIH staff members. Designed for investigators, fellows, students, research administrators, and others, we provide insights on grant topics from those who live and breathe the information. In mp3 and updated every other week.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

VIDEO ON PEER REVIEW AT NIH
http://www.csr.nih.gov/video/video.asp
The Center for Scientific Review has produced a video of a mock study section meeting to provide an inside look at how NIH grant applications are reviewed for scientific and technical merit. The video shows how outside experts assess applications and how review meetings are conducted to ensure fairness. The video also includes information on what applicants can do to improve the chances their applications will receive a positive review.
(Last checked 09/15/06)

WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR GRANT APPLICATION : A PRIMER FOR NEW APPLICANTS
http://cms.csr.nih.gov/AboutCSR/OverviewofPeerReviewProcess.htm
Overview of the peer review process by the National Institutes of Health's Center for Scientific Review.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WHERE THE NIH DOLLARS ARE: FIVE FUNDING STRATEGIES FOR LEANER TIMES, see GINA SHAW'S ADVICE ON FUNDING FROM THE NIH AND BEYOND : A TWO-PART SERIES

WORDS WORTH THEIR WEIGHT IN CASH
http://chronicle.com/article/Words-Worth-Their-Weight-in/44895/
The heart of any grant proposal is the narrative. It is essential to do a good job on that section, because it can make or break whether you get your money. Article by Karen M. Markin, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 8, 2005.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITE A STRONGER GRANT : WHAT REVIEWERS LOOK FOR IN GRANT APPLICATIONS
http://www.thegranthelpers.com/blog/bid/52099/Write-a-Stronger-Grant-What-Reviewers-Look-for-in-Grant-Applications
When writing proposals you should always keep the reviewers in mind. They are human beings that have their own interests, that get hungry, that get tired, that get annoyed, and so on. You need to convince these people relatively quickly that your project is well organized, worth doing, and that you are the person to do it. Posted by Katie Adams on Mon, Jan 31, 2011.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING A GOOD GRANT PROPOSAL
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/simonpj/papers/proposal.html
Advice from Simon Peyton Jones and Alan Bundy, Microsoft.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING A GRANT
http://www.niddk.nih.gov/fund/grants_process/grantwriting.htm
Advice from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING EFFECTIVE GRANT PROPOSALS FOR INDIVIDUAL FELLOWSHIPS IN THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
http://apps.carleton.edu/campus/doc/faculty_resources/research_and_grants/external_grants/writing_effective_proposals/
Courtesy of Susan Stanford Friedman, University of Wisconsin-Madison via Carleton College.
(Last checked 07/16/13)

WRITING FELLOWSHIP ESSAYS
http://www.yale.edu/yalecollege/academics/fellowships/application/essays.html
Advice from Yale University, International Education and Fellowship Programs.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING FROM THE WINNER'S CIRCLE:
A GUIDE TO PREPARING COMPETITIVE GRANT PROPOSALS
http://web.archive.org/web/20060823122249/http://epscor.unl.edu/rfps/winnerscircle.shtml
Note : works best with Mozilla Firefox.
A booklet prepared by Dr. David Stanley, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is about writing and submitting competitive grant proposals. It is addressed to colleagues who feel they may benefit from a quick look at the granting process.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING GRANT PROPOSALS FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH
http://www.wennergren.org/news/advice-how-write-a-grant-proposal
By Dr. Sydel Silverman, President of the Wenner-Gren Foundation from 1986 to 2000. In her role as President, Dr. Silverman made funding decisions on all grant applications coming to the Foundation. The article was published in Current Anthropology in 1991 and it continues to be one of the best general discussions on how to prepare a grant proposal for anthropological research, containing invaluable advice for scholars as they prepare to apply for funding.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING GRANTS (ESPECIALLY FOR THE HUMANITIES)
http://web.archive.org/web/20061118203651/http://virtual.park.uga.edu/cdesmet/grantwri.htm
Practical advice from Christy Desmet, University of Georgia, English Department. May 16, 1997. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING PERSONAL STATEMENTS AND ESSAYS FOR FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
http://www.wpi.edu/Academics/FS/essays.html
Every fellowship or graduate school application requires a statement that asks, in one way or another, for the candidate to describe their academic or other interests. This personal statement is your introduction to the selection committee. An outstanding personal statement will not win you a scholarship, but a poorly prepared one can deny you the chance to be considered as a finalist. Advice from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING PROPOSALS FOR ACLS FELLOWSHIP COMPETITIONS
http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Publications/Programs/Writing_Fellowship_Proposals.pdf
Advice from Christina M. Gillis, is a former program officer at the American Council for Learned Societies, where she was responsible for the fellowship programs.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING SCHOLARSHIP ESSAYS
http://www.k-state.edu/artsci/scholarship/essay.html
Advice from Kansas State University College of Arts and Sciences.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING THE HUMANITIES OR ARTS PROPOSAL
Still available thanks to the Internet Archive
Advice from the University of Michigan Division of Research and Development Administration. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

WRITING WINNING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP AND GRADUATE RESEARCH APPLICATIONS
http://archive.lib.msu.edu.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/eres/msuonly/grants/WritingWinningGraduateFellowships.pdf Practical advice from Mary Ann Walker on behalf of the MSU Graduate School, 2012.
(Last checked 07/17/14)

 


Books

The books mentioned on this page are available for public use in the Michigan State University Libraries. If you are unable to visit our library, consider visiting a Foundation Center Cooperating Collection in your home state or a local public library in your home town. If the books are not available there, ask about interlibrary loan or visit a local bookstore to find out whether they can be purchased.

ADVANCEMENT SERVICES: RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR FUND RAISING. Washington, D.C. : Council for Advancement and Support of Education, 1999. 228pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .A38 1999
This book, edited by the director of alumni and development records at Duke University, aims to sharpen the skills of campus fund raisers and introduce them to new methods of discovering donors.
[Educational fund raising -- United States]

BUILDING BRIDGES : FUND RAISING FOR DEANS, FACULTY, AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICERS. Mary Kay Murphy. Washington, D.C. : Council for Advancement and Support of Education, 1992. 131pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .B85 1992
The book's four sections cover strategic planning and defining the roles of development-team members, ethics and attitudes necessary for successful fund raising, determining who to approach for major gifts and how to go about the solicitation process, and considerations for deans at small or health-sciences institutions.
[Educational fund raising -- United States]
[Education, Higher -- United States -- Finance]
[Public relations -- Universities and colleges -- United States]

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN IN HIGHER EDUCATION: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT. G. David Gearhart. Washington, D.C. : National Association of College and University Business Officers, 1995. 220pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .G43 1995
Kick off your campaign with this practical guide to planning and waging college and university capital campaigns.
[Educational fund raising]

CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS : 21 WAYS TO REACH YOUR GOAL. Washington, D.C. : Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, 1990. 51pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .C36 1989
A collection of articles written mostly by college fund raisers and consultants discussing such topics as feasibility studies, fund-raising stratgies, and the role of trustees, alumni, and public relations officials in capital campaigns.
[Educational fund raising]

CULTIVATING FOUNDATION SUPPORT FOR EDUCATION. Mary Kay Murphy, ed. Washington, D.C. : Council for Advancement and Support of Education, 1989. 210pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .C78 1989
Shows development officers how to understand the foundation's mission; research for potential foundation matches; make the initial approach; develop a winning proposal; and administer a grant to create a lasting partnership. In all, it includes 26 essays exploring every aspect of building your working relationships with foundations.
[Educational fund raising -- United States]
[Endowments -- United States]

THE DEAN'S ROLE IN FUND RAISING : PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. Margarete Rooney Hall. Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993. 120pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2335.95 .H35 1992
[Educational fund raising]

DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE MAJOR GIFT PROGRAM : FROM MANAGING STAFF TO SOLICITING GIFTS. Roy Muir and Jerry May, eds. Washington, D.C. : Council for Advancement and Support of Education, 1993. 134pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .D36 1993
Designed for fundraisers in education, but with a wealth of information applicable to all fundraising. Individually authored chapters discuss management of a major gift campaign, developing staff, setting guidelines, prospect research, prospect management, using volunteers, narrowing the field, special events, solicitation, and stewardship of major donors. Includes extensive annotated bibliogrpahy of donor research resources.
[Fund raising]
[Educational fund raising]

DEVELOPING SKILLS IN PROPOSAL WRITING. Mary Hall. Portland, Oregon : Portland State University, Continuing Education Publications, 1977. 2nd edition, 339pp. Funding Center (1 East) PN147 .H28 1977
A basic overview, including preliminary activities as well as actual tips on writing proposals.
[Proposal writing in the social sciences]

DOLLARS FOR EXCELLENCE. Roy Bunce and Stanton Leggett. Chicago, Ill. : Pluribus Press, 1988. 312pp. Funding Center (1 East) HG177.5 .U6 B86 1988
Focusing on the individual, who accounts for 90% of the charitable dollar, this book shows how to reach the right people. It explains what motivates individuals to give and how you can tap into that. Complete and easy to follow, it answers every question you have about educational fundraising.
[Educational fund raising]
[Education -- finance]

THE DYNAMICS OF FUNDING : AN EDUCATOR'S GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE GRANTSMANSHIP. Paul B. Warren. Boston, Mass. : Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1980. 366pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .W36
A history of the postwar bureaucratization of secular patronage for higher learning. It also provides insights into the fundamentals of grantsmanship.
[Endowments - United States]

EDUCATIONAL FUND RAISING : PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. Michael J. Worth, ed. Phoenix, Az. : Oryx Press, 1993. 464pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .E38
Designed for staff of university, college and community college development offices; donor research offices; university foundations; sponsored research departments; and academic librarians. Consists of 36 articles by experts in fund-raising and university development. Topics addressed include the elements of a development program, donors, institutional planning, annual giving, capital campaigns, corporation and foundation support, and targeting special constituencies. Includes glossary and bibliography of further readings.
[Educational fund raising -- United States]

EDUCATOR'S GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING AND FUNDING EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS. John Chandler and Ruthmary Cordon-Cradler. International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), 1994. 3rd edition, 155pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB1028.3 .C884 1994
Designed for teachers and administrators who want a practical step-by-step guide for developing grant proposals. Includes sections on proposal planning, identifying funding sources, writing the proposal, working with funding agencies, and sample proposals.
[Educational fund raising]

EFFECTIVE FUND RAISING IN HIGHER EDUCATION : TEN SUCCESS STORIES. Margaret A. Duronio and Bruce A. Loessin. San Francisco, Cal. : Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1991. 251pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .D84 1991
Presents detailed studies of successful fund-raising programs at ten diverse institutions and examines what specific factors have contributed to their success.
[Educational fund raising -- United States]

ESTABLISHING A UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION. Donald L. Lemish. Washington, D.C.: American Association of State Colleges and Universities, c1989. 39pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336.L4 E8 1989
Also listed under Academic fundraising.
[State universities and colleges -- Finance -- United States]
[Educational fund raising -- United States]
[Endowments -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]

FIRST TIME GRANTWRITER'S GUIDE TO SUCCESS. Cynthia Knowles. Thousand Oaks, Ca. : Corwin/Sage, 2002. 137pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 K56 2002
This toolkit covers the elements of the proposal package, writing style, budget development, and other aspects of completing the application for grants from government and private sources. Includes glossary.
[Educational fund raising -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
[Proposal writing for grants -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]

THE FOUNDATION HANDBOOK : A PRIVATE FOUNDATION APPROACH TO FUND RAISING AT STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES. Donald L. Lemish. Washington, D.C. : American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 1981. 28pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .L45
An overview of the mechanics of private fund raising -- organization, staffing, policies, and procedures -- for colleges and universities.
[Endowments -- handbooks, manuals, etc.]
[Universities and colleges -- finance -- handbooks, manuals, etc.]

FUND-RAISING LEADERSHIP : A GUIDE FOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BOARDS. J.W. Pocock. Washington, D.C. : The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 1989. 151pp. Funding Center (1 East) HG177.5 .U6 P6 1989
[Fund raising -- United States -- management]
[Educational fund raising -- United States -- management]

GRANT APPLICATION WRITER'S HANDBOOK / Liane Reif-Lehrer. Sudbury, Mass : Jones and Bartlett, c2005. 4th edition, 362pp. Funding Center (1 East) R853.P75 R439 2005
Drawing on her significant experience with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Reif-Lehrer focuses on the practical side of grant-writing. She guides readers through getting started, including clearly defining the purposes of the application, gathering relevant information, understanding the roles of the funding agency and the applicant, and getting the application in order. She describes the review process of the NIH, writing the application's administrative and financial information and the research plan, preparing and writing the research plan, submitting and tracking the application, and allowing for summary statements, rebuttals and revisions. Appendices include strategies for good written and oral presentation, information on the NIH, and advice on applying to the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Reif-Lehrer updates information on procedures and online applications for this edition.
[Proposal writing in medicine]

GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE GRANT WRITING : HOT TO WRITE A SUCCESSFUL NIH GRANT / by Otto O. Yang. New York : Kluwer Academic, c2005. 93pp. Funding Center (1 East) RA11.D6 Y36 2005
Also available online
Guide to Effective Grant Writing: How to Write a Successful NIH Grant is written to help the 100,000+ post-graduate students and professionals who need to write effective proposals for grants. There is little or no formal teaching about the process of writing grants for NIH, and many grant applications are rejected due to poor writing and weak formulation of ideas. Procuring grant funding is the central key to survival for any academic researcher in the biological sciences; thus, being able to write a proposal that effectively illustrates one's ideas is essential. Covering all aspects of the proposal process, from the most basic questions about form and style to the task of seeking funding, this volume offers clear advice backed up with excellent examples. Included are a number of specimen proposals to help shed light on the important issues surrounding the writing of proposals. The Guide is a clear, straight-forward, and reader-friendly tool.Guide to Effective Grant Writing: How to Write a Successful NIH Grant Writing is based on Dr. Yang's extensive experience serving on NIH grant review panels; it covers the common mistakes and problems he routinely witnesses while reviewing grants.
[Proposal writing for grants]

HOW TO WRITE A GRANT APPLICATION / Allan Hackshaw. Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. R853.P75 H33 2011 Online Resource
Hackshaw (deputy director, Cancer Research UK and U. College London Cancer Trials Centre) presents this concise guide to the grant writing process. Advice is given on how to successfully obtain grants for a variety of projects including observational studies, clinical trials, laboratory experiments, and systematic reviews. Due to the degree of heavy regulation of clinical trials, a grant applicant needs to be familiar with a whole range of terminology and complex concepts. Intended for those who are preparing to apply for a clinical grant, this guide covers this complex process in an accessible manner.
[Proposal writing for grants]
[Proposal writing in medicine]

HOW TO WRITE A SUCCESSFUL RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATION : A GUIDE FOR SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENTISTS. New York : Springer, Oct. 2010. 2nd edition, 300pp. Online Resource
Over the last fifty years behavioral and medical research has been generously supported by the federal government, private foundations, and other philanthropic organizations contributing to the development of a vibrant public health system both in the United States and worldwide. However, these funds are dwindling and to stay competitive, investigators must understand the funding environment and know how to translate their hypotheses into research grant applications that reviewers evaluate as having scientific merit. The Second Edition of 'How to Write a Successful Research Grant Application' is the only book of its kind written by federal research investigators which provides technical assistance for researchers applying for biobehavioral and psychosocial research funding and can give them an edge in this competitive environment. The book provides invaluable tips on all aspects of the art of grantsmanship, including: how to determine research opportunities and priorities, how to develop the different elements of an application, how to negotiate the electronic submission and review processes, and how to disseminate the findings. Charts, visual aids, Web links, an extensive real-world example of a research proposal with budget, and a "So You Were Awarded Your Grant-Now What?" chapter show prospective applicants how to:- Formulate a testworthy-and interesting-hypothesis.- Select the appropriate research mechanism.- Avoid common pitfalls in proposal writing.- Develop an adequate control group.- Conduct a rigorous qualitative inquiry.- Develop a budget justification of costs.- Develop a human subjects of animal welfare plan.- Write a data analytic plan.- Design a quality control/assurance program.- Read between the lines of a summary of the review of your application.Although its focus is on Public Health Service funding, 'How to Write a Successful Research Grant' is equally useful for all research proposals, including graduate students preparing a thesis or dissertation proposal. Service providers in community-based organizations and public health agencies will also find this a useful resource in preparing a proposal to compete for grant funds from state and community resources, non-government organizations, and foundations.
[Proposal writing for grants]
[Proposal writing in medicine]

A PEDIATRICIAN'S GUIDE TO PROPOSAL WRITING / prepared by Jennie Cabrera, Linda Paul, Mary Alice Rice. Elk Grove Village, IL : American Academy of Pediatrics, c2000. Funding Center (1 East) R853.P75 C33 2000
Note: Also available online.
[Proposal writing in medicine]

RESEARCH PROPOSALS : A GUIDE TO SUCCESS / Thomas E. Ogden, Israel A. Goldberg. San Diego, Calif. : Academic Press, c2002. 3rd edition, 368pp. Funding Center (1 East) R853.P75 O35 2002
This third edition of the classic "how-to" guide incorporates recent changes in policies and procedures of the NIH, with particular emphasis on the role of the Internet in the research proposal process. Completely revised and updated, it reveals the secrets of success used by seasoned investigators, and directs the reader through the maze of NIH bureaucracies. In addition to providing a detailed overview of the entire review process, the book also includes hundreds of tips on how to enhance proposals, excerpts from real proposals, and extensive Internet references. This book is essential to all scientists involved in the grant writing process. Key Features: (1) Considers the reviewer's perspective (2) Detailed presentation of the review process (3) All sections of the R01 proposal are reviewed (4) Hundreds of tips to enhance proposals (5) Includes the many recent changes in NIH policies (6) Includes many excerpts from real proposals (7) Provides extensive Internet references Benefits: (1) Increased competitiveness (2) Better priority scores (3) Less chance of triage (4) Increased award rates (5) Uses the system to advantage (6) Reveals strategies used by the "old pros"
[Proposal writing in medicine]

WRITE AN EFFECTIVE FUNDING APPLICATION: A GUIDE FOR RESEARCHERS AND SCHOLARS. Mary W. Walters. John Hopkins University Press, 2009. 151pp. Funding Center (1 East) HG177 .W35 2009
In a world where the opportunity to advance scholarly and scientific knowledge is dependent on the ability to secure sufficient funding, researchers and scholars must write funding proposals that stand out from the competition. The practical advice in this guidebook is designed to aid academics in writing successful applications at all stages of their careers. This book will help grant applicants plan and craft funding proposals that are concise, complete, and impressive—and that satisfy the mandates of the agencies to which they are applying. Applicants will learn how to (1) Avoid common writing blunders; (2) Understand the central importance of the research budget; (3) Overcome procrastination; (4) Choose and secure professional reference;s (5) Develop a career path with a view toward funding opportunities; (6) Maintain a winning attitude that will improve the chances of success. Write an Effective Funding Application details the all-important preparation stage in drafting a grant application, from identifying sources of funding and securing registration numbers to creating a schedule for meeting the application deadline. It reviews the nuts and bolts of writing and polishing a winning application, stressing the importance of logical thinking and thoughtful presentation. The book includes detailed information on developing budgets, "before" and "after" versions of proposals, and descriptions of common pitfalls that everyone can avoid.
[Proposal writing for grants]

WRITNG SUCCESSFUL GRANT PROPOSALS FROM THE TOP DOWN AND THE BOTTOM UP / edited by Robert J. Sternberg, Oklahoma State University. Los Angeles : Sage, [2014] 355pp. Funding Center (1 East) Q180.55.P7 B85 2014
Sternberg presents 19 chapters that show researchers and students in the behavioral, cognitive, and social sciences and related fields how to write a grant proposal that has a strong foundation and a vision and plan. Individuals who have overseen the grant process at agencies in the US, as well as scientists who have received grants, describe general aspects of the process and proposals, common mistakes, and writing proposals for specific funding agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the Institute of Education Sciences, private foundations, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, as well as collaborative proposals.

WRITING THE NIH GRANT PROPOSAL : A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE / William Gerin. Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2006. 321pp. Funding Center (1 East) RA11.D6 G47 2006
Written by an author with proven success in obtaining NIH grants and in developing grant application workshops for university and convention settings, this book features actual forms from NIH grant applications - including the brand new SF 424 forms - which have been annotated so as to guide readers step-by-step, highlighting unexpected nuances that can make all the difference between winning and losing a grant. This unique book extensively covers SBIR and STTR grants as well.
[Proposal writing in medicine]


Additional Web Pages of Interest

Catalog of Nonprofit Literature
http://lnps.fdncenter.org/
Want to use a database to find articles and books to read? LNPS Online is a searchable database of the literature of philanthropy. It incorporates the unique contents of the Foundation Center's five libraries and contains more than 24,000 full bibliographic citations, of which more than 16,300 have descriptive abstracts. Drawing on the combined resources of five national libraries, the database is updated daily. Items covered deal with everything from the theory and philosophy of philanthropy, biographies of philanthropists, administration and management of nonprofits, and materials issued by foundations or nonprofit organizations. Sample search: enter "fundraising" as subject and "school" as a keyword. Ask your local library if they carry the journals or books cited. If not ask about Interlibrary Loan.
(Last checked 03/19/07) 

If you are interested in more books about fundraising, proposal writing, and related topics that are available in the MSU Libraries, review the following bibliography arranged in alphabetical order by title:

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I-L | M-O | P-Q | R-S | T-Z

If you are interested in video titles on proposal writing and related topics available at the MSU Libraries, review Video Titles Only

 

Additional web sites on

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WWW http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/
 

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