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Fundraising for Educators Web Resources (131)


 

Web Sites | Books | Additional Resources
 

This web site is intended as a starting point for elementary and secondary school administrators and teachers who are interested in learning more about foundations, fundraising, proposal writing, etc.

Note: Links to the Internet Archive work best with Mozilla Firefox. Wait a moment for the link to redirect.


Web Sites

10 GREAT WAYS TO GET A GRANT
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=83
Discover the secrets of successful grant writing thanks to several experts who give their best advice on drafting grant proposals that work. Advice from Susan Mandel, Scholastic Administrator.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

10 TIPS FOR GRANTWRITERS
Internet Archive Link
Where to find money to enhance educational opportunities. Courtesy of TeachNet.Org. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

30 TIPS FOR A WINNING SALES FUNDRAISER
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/109-30-tips-for-a-winning-sales-fundraiser
Make any sales fundraiser a success by following these pointers. Article by Christy Forhan appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

40 TIPS ON HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL
Internet Archive Link
Courtesy of the Oakland Michigan School District. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

ACQUIRING RESOURCES : FUNDRAISING
http://happeninhabitats.pwnet.org/pdf/Fundraising.pdf
Advice from the National Wildlife Federation on finding possible sources of money for schoolyard habitats and gardens. Includes a sample proposal letter.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS
GRANTS AND FUNDING LINKS
Internet Archive Link
With limited budgets, it is essential that school leaders make the most of available grants and funding resources. Since it's not always easy to find funding, AASA has compiled a list of education grant and funding resources. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

ARE YOU MISSING OUT?
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/rumissingout.pdf
Stan Levenson reveals new funding options for schools. Article by Jacob Milner from Interactive Educator, Vol. 3 issue 1, Winter 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

THE ART OF THE DEAL -- NO TRUMP :
GRANT-WRITING AND EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS FOR DIFFICULT TIMES
http://fno.org/fnosept91.html
When funding for innovative programs dries up, enterprising school people roll up their sleeves and start seeking aid from unexpected quarters. Otherwise they must await economic recovery. This article will touch upon a few tricks of the grant-seeking trade which might prove useful to technology wizards who suddenly find themselves wearing (by necessity) the hat of some central office planner/grant writer who left this past June with pink slip in hand. Source: From Now On: The Educational Technology Journal, Vol. 1, no. 7, September 1991.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

AUCTION ACTION PLAN
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/50-auction-action-plan
Secrets the pros use to turn even small auctions into highly profitable big-dollar fundraisers. Article by Ed Ritchie appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BAKE SALES ARE OUT : SCHOOLS TURN TO BIG-MONEY AUCTIONS
No longer available online; try retrieving article from microfilm
Two years ago, Kerri Barno staged a revolution at her children's school. / "I got sick and tired of buying $20 wrapping paper and $15 boxes of chocolate with six pieces in it for a fund-raiser. So I suggested we do an auction," said Barno, who is president of the Parent Teacher League at Immanuel Lutheran School in Macomb Township. / "I did it with a goal of $15,000 in mind and we raised close to $35,000 with 300 people in attendance. So, needless to say, I'm on the auction committee for life!" Article by Peggy Walsh-Sarnecki appearing in the Detroit Free Press, March 5, 2005.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BAN BAKE SALES FOR BOOKS
http://www.education-world.com/a_issues/issues224.shtml
This week, educator Rich Henderson asks, "Are we supposed to be teaching our kids to read or sell door to door?" He rails against the need to hold bake sales, box top collecting drives, and cow chip bingo games to buy what taxpayers should already be providing! Included: A chance to Join the Discussion! Are fund-raisers the way to go -- or should they just go away? Richard Henderson, Education World. Nov. 2, 2001.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BEST AND WORST : RATING THE CLIP-AND-SAVE FUNDRAISERS
http://www.ptotoday.com/0304clip.html
How can you tell which programs should make your cut? What follows is PTO Todays detailed rundown on the most popular programs, a description of how we assess each one, our exclusive program grades, and some tips for matching your school to the best programs for you. Article by Tim Sullivan, PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BEYOND THE BAKE SALE
http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.php?articleID=196604463
It's a rare school that doesn't depend on at least one or two annual fundraisers to support activities beyond the basics. Factor in all the disparate annual sales, including those for clubs and the always-popular one held by the PTSA, and it's easy to end up juggling way too many fundraising activities in no time. Susan Brooks-Young, Technology & Learning, May 15, 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BEYOND THE BAKE SALE
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/BeyondTheBakeSale.htm
While public schools have been pushing candy sales, car washes, and other nickel-and-dime fund-raising efforts, private schools, colleges, universities, and nonprofit organizations have been busy raising billions of dollars each year from corporations, foundations, the government, and private citizens. An article by Stan Levenson appearing in American School Board Journal, May 2003.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BEYOND THE BAKE SALE
http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/2002/oct/schools/index.html
It's no secret: Public schools often have a tough time with funding. Many are now looking for new sources of money that don't depend on taxpayers. The amounts don't usually rival tax contributions, but even a few thousand dollars can make a difference at a school. In "Beyond the Bake Sale," a three-part series for Morning Edition, NPR's Emily Harris takes a look at some ways public schools are turning to private money, the benefits and the consequences.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BIG DEAL
http://www.bigdealbook.com/newsletter_archive.aspx
Big Deal Books are resources of interest to various audiences within the education market (K-6 reading specialists, K-12 urban teachers, K-12 technology directors and coordinators, higher education technology professionals, middle school/high school educators of struggling, ESL/ELL and at-risk students). Each of the Big Deal Book newsletters provide current sources of grant and contest information, free materials and equipment, professional development training programs, digital curriculum and annotated Web sites for research and enrichment.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

THE BIG GIFT : A NEW FUNDRAISING STRATEGY FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/TheBigGift.htm
Our public schools are in financial trouble and everyone knows it. The cost of providing a world-class education has gone well beyond taxpayer dollars. Worthwhile programs like music, art, physical education, and foreign languages have been curtailed or eliminated. Sports and other extracurricular activities have also taken a hit, and neighborhood schools have been shut down. Most disturbing is that in many areas of the country, the ax is falling on core academic programs, and the trend is likely to continue. For years, colleges and universities -especially public institution- have struggled under similar budgetary constraints. But they have found a way to keep class sizes down, hire and retain high-quality staff, add buildings and grounds, and expand important academic and nonacademic programs. How do they do it? By organizing highly sophisticated development offices, hiring experienced fundraisers, and raising billions of dollars. They see the development office as a profit center that goes after big grants and gifts to augment building programs, sports programs, creative and performing arts pro-grams, and other vital programs that make for world-class institutions. In essence, they have become big-time fundraisers. Article by Stan Levenson from American School Board Journal, February, 2006.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

A BIGGER PIECE OF THE PIE
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/BiggerPieceOfThePie.htm
Using sophisticated fundraising techniques taught in workshops and courses all over the country, a number of secondary school principals and others are looking beyond their traditional funding sources--bake sales, pizza and candy sales, and car washes--and are learning more-sophisticated techniques for raising millions of dollars for their public schools. Sitting idle while private schools, colleges, universities, and nonprofit organizations reap all the rewards is not an option. If public schools are to compete for needed dollars, they must aggressively apply the fundraising strategies used so effectively by these other organizations. Article by Stan Levenson appearing in Principal Leadership, January 2003, Vol. 3, No. 5.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

BOOKS ON EDUCATIONAL FUNDRAISING IN THE MSU LIBRARIES
http://magic.msu.edu/search/dEducational+fund+raising+--+United+States./
deducational+fund+raising+united+states/-5,-1,0,B/exact&FF=
deducational+fund+raising+united+states&1,49,

Annotations can usually be located by searching Grantsmanship Techniques.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

CARL PERKINS FUNDING GUIDE ONLINE
http://www.academicinnovations.com/calperk.html
To assist you in writing grants for Perkins funds, Academic Innovations has prepared an easy-to-understand guide. Includes the following sections:
(1) How To Build a Strong Proposal
(2) Funding Decisions are Personal
(3) Defining the Need, Purpose and Goals of Your Program
(4) Fundable Projects - Team and Cluster Concept
(5) Examples of a District Plan and Objectives
(6) Suggested Narratives for Proposals
(Last checked 07/10/13)

CATALOG OF NONPROFIT LITERATURE
http://lnps.fdncenter.org/
Use the search engine to identify books and journal articles on fundraising for schools or elementary and secondary education.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

CHEERLEADING FUNDRAISER DO'S AND DON'TS
Internet Archive Link
So you need new uniforms and your squad wants to go to camp? Well it’s time to raise money! Here are some fundraiser do’s and don’ts to give your squad a fun, safe way to earn money. Advice by Sunni Schultz Pieschala. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

COMPUTERS FOR LEARNING
http://www.computers.fed.gov/
This program is designed to donate surplus Federal computer equipment to schools and educational nonprofits, giving special consideration to those with the greatest need. Web site provides electronic registration.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

COOKING UP A SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISER
http://www.ptotoday.com/0800cookbook.html
Fundraising cookbooks present unique challenges and tasty (and profitable!) rewards. Savor the possibilities. Article by Alicia Miller appearing in PTO Today, Vol. 2, Issue, 1, Aug/Sept 2000.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

CORPORATE FOUNDATIONS
Internet Archive Link
This article describes how teachers can apply for funding from corporate foundations. The author explains what a corporate foundation is and how to locate an appropriate corporate foundation to match funding needs, and she specifies the criteria that are often associated with this type of funding. The article also provides an example of a foundation that established a K-12 science program and links to additional web sites for further information. Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

CORPORATE MONEY, 101
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/CampusTechnology.pdf
Interested in corporate and foundations grants for distance learning initiatives? Here's the primer that will help you find those most-coveted (but oft unsought) dollars. Article by Stan Levenson appearing in Campus Technology Magazine, April 2008.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

DIGGING UP FUNDS FOR SCIENCE
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/sciencefunds.htm
Is your science program suffering from the "budget blues"? Here's how to find the funds you need! Advice from Joyce Baldwin sponsored by Scholastic.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

DO IT YOURSELF GRANT SEARCH:
YOUR DIRECT LINK TO ONLINE FUNDING SOURCES
Internet Archive Link
Advice from Chris Burch, Madison (Wisconsin) Metropolitan School District, Grants and Fund Development Office, 1998. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

DONORSCHOOSE.org : TEACHERS ASK. YOU CHOOSE. STUDENTS LEARN.
http://www.donorschoose.org/homepage/main.html
Description : Want To Buy My Students a $392 Camcorder? A nonprofit uses the Web to work marketplace magic.. Article by Jonathan Alter appearing in Slate, Feb. 16, 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

DOs AND DON'Ts OF GRANT WRITING
Internet Archive Link
This web site provides sound advice concerning the nine major parts of a grant proposal, including both dos and don'ts, courtesy of The Grantsmanship Center (Program Planning and Proposal Writing, Karen Denard Goldman and Kathleen Jahn Schmalz (Rutgers University), and Genesee Intermediate School District - Grants and Development Department (Grantwriting 101). Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

EASYFUNDRAISINGIDEAS.COM
http://www.easy-fundraising-ideas.com/
This company lists many fundraising ideas and products for schools, bands, cheerleaders, etc.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

EDUCATIONAL FUNDRAISING EXAMPLES: WEB SITE HELPS PAY FOR SCHOOL
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/educfr.htm
How a small private school in North Carolina came up with a way to raise funds for operations on a continuing basis.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

ELEMENTS OF A GRANT PROPOSAL
Internet Archive Link
Courtesy of TeachNet.Org. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

A FEW IDEAS ABOUT PURSUING FEDERAL FUNDING
Internet Archive Link
Since Writing Season is just ahead and, also, since CEC regularly receives requests for assistance from individuals and agencies interested in applying for federal grants, we are devoting part of our CEC web site to the subject of grants and how you might go about getting them accepted for funding. We offer the following ideas and suggestions (but no guarantees) to those setting out in search of the elusive pot of gold. Advice from Ralph Nelsen.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FINANCING AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS
http://www.financeproject.org/Publications/financing_afterschool_programs.htm
This working paper provides a general overview of after-school programs, the costs associated with building and maintaining after-school programs, and the variety of funding sources that are available to support both direct services and infrastructure for after-school programs. Prepared by Robert Halpern, Sharon Deich, and Carol Cohen for the Finance Project. May 2000.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FINANCING FAMILY RESOURCE CENTERS: A GUIDE TO SOURCES AND STRATEGIES
http://www.financeproject.org/Publications/family_resource_centers.pdf
This guide is intended to help those who run family resource centers -- and those who fund them -- make well-informed, strategic decisions about financing. The guide describes the characteristics of family resource centers, principles and strategies for financing them, and current financing sources. It also discusses potential reforms for improving the financing environment. Sara Watson and Mirlam Westehimer. Finance Project. April 2000.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FINDING FUNDING : A DOZEN DARING IDEAS
http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.php?articleID=21700262
As state coffers continue to shrink this year, there is less money for education and much of what is available is earmarked for mandates. Without deep pockets anywhere, districts have to think strategically and look for even more creative ways to fund their priorities. The money is out there if you know how to look for it, create it, or borrow it. Read on for this year's dozen daring ideas from TechLearning.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FINDING FUNDING : A GUIDE TO FEDERAL SOURCES FOR OUT-OF-SCHOOL TIME AND COMMUNITY SCHOOL INITIATIVES
http://www.financeproject.org/Publications/FundingGuide2003.pdf
This guide provides information on more than 100 federal programs that may potentially provide funding for, or support through loans, out-of-school time and community school programs. In addition, the guide describes different approaches for accessing these funds and strategies for combining different funding streams. Heather Clapp Padgette. Revised and updated January 2003. Finance Project. 178pp.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FINDING, WRITING, AND GETTING THE RIGHT GRANT FOR YOU
http://www-ed.fnal.gov/lincon/issue_funding.shtml
Provides information on sources for funding, strategies for success in the grant-writing process, how to write a grant and what to do once you receive one (besides spend the money). Created for the Fermilab LInC program by Christine Marszalek and last updated June 18, 2001.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FIVE KEYS TO A SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL FOUNDATION
http://www.eschoolnews.com/2001/09/01/five-keys-to-a-successful-school-foundation/
If you're looking for a way to create additional financial support and resources for your school district, you might consider starting a foundation. Known as public school foundations or local education foundations, these organizations are, and should be, distinct from the school board and the district itself. In these days of budget cuts, rising expectations for schools, and decreasing tax revenues, foundations can provide a way to increase community participation through volunteer opportunities and stakeholder "buy-in" to your district. Advice from Deborah Ward, eSchool News, September 1, 2001.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FOUNDATIONS
Internet Archive Link
According to this article, a range of U.S. foundations have grant money for groups and individuals involved in educational improvement. The author urges educators to investigate various foundations to find those with goals similar to the educators' goals. It is also useful to look at what programs each foundation has funded and to consider geography as well; some foundations only consider programs at the local level. Web pages offer lists of foundations and links to detailed information. The author suggests taking time to choose the right foundation match and reviews several grant programs specific to science and math education. Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FOUR RULES FOR GETTING YOUR GRANT APPROVED
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3749090
Keith Butcher, executive director for the Regional Education Service Agency in Beckley, West Virginia, has applied for and received more than $500 million in local, state, and federal grant funding to achieve school, regional, and state program goals. How did he do it? Beyond the mandatory basics of proper planning and using spell check, Butcher has a few other winning tricks. Check out these four tips. Courtesy of Scholastic Administrator.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FREE STILL ISN'T GOOD ENOUGH
Internet Archive Link
Through-school marketing programs continue to grow. Why? And what should you look for in choosing programs for your group? Article by Tim Sullivan appearing in PTO Today, Vol. 2, Issue 2, November/December 2000. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

THE FUNDAMENTALS OF FUNDING : HOW TO IDENTIFY, WRITE, AND SUBMIT GRANTS FOR SCHOOL AND PROGRAM INITIATIVES (online webinar offered by Edutopia, August 27, 2009)
http://www.edutopia.org/funding-grants-webinar-archive
Presenter: Kathleen Petersen, director of Title I programming for Utah's Washington County School District and former principal of the district's Santa Clara Elementary School, in Santa Clara, Utah, demystifies the process of researching, designing, writing, and implementing grants.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDING OUR PLAYGROUND
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/279-funding-our-playground
How one PTA met its goal of raising $40,000 in a single year to update the school playground. Article by by Margie Markarian appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDING YOUR BEST IDEAS: A 12-STEP PROGRAM
http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/fipse/steps.html
Tips by Joan Straumanis, a Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education Program Officer.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISERS FOR CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.funattic.com/fundrais.htm
Fundraising ideas from Fund-Attic.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUND-RAISING AND GIFTS: HOW TO GET STARTED
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/fund_raising.htm
Advice from Gary Carnow sponsored by Scholastic. School budgets are lean across the country, and teachers and parents have responded with a renewed interest in fund-raising. Fund-raising is no longer just selling chocolate bars or collecting newspapers. Schools are turning social events and fun fairs into big money-makers.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING BASICS FOR PRIVATE SCHOOL FACILITIES
http://magic.msu.edu/record=b6585694~S39a
This report examines the process behind setting up and implementing a "capital campaign": a program for raising money for new or renovated facilities at private K-12 schools. The report briefly covers tax information regarding gifts to institutions then offers advice for setting up a comprehensive development program, including fundraising software and tips on implementing all the components of a development program. Campaign planning issues are discussed on using fundraising consultants, drafting and assembling specific campaign documents, conducting a feasibility or planning study, and developing a campaign strategy. Final comments explore what to expect and be prepared for while conducting a capital campaign. Arthur H. Roach, Fundraising Consultant, March 2001, for National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities. 6pp.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGNS FOR SCHOOL FACILITIES
http://www.ncef.org/rl/fundraising.cfm
National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF)'s resource list of links, books, and journal articles on planning and conducting a school facilities capital campaign, including general fundraising principles and practices.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING FOR PTAS
http://www.capta.org/sections/finance/fundraising.cfm
Fundraising is the method of raising money to finance PTA programs and projects. The fund-raising project must support the goals of PTA and be related to the educational, charitable, and philanthropic purposes as a tax-exempt organization. When planning the year’s activities, PTAs should use the 3-to-1 rule. For every one fund-raising activity, there should be at least three non-fund-raising programs aimed at helping parents or children or advocating for school improvements. Courtesy of the California State PTA, 2008.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING FOR YOUTH GROUPS
Internet Archive Link
Lists fundraisers for youth groups interested in raising money for travel. Courtesy of Explorations in Travel, Inc. [Also listed under Fundraising for Nonprofits.] Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING HELP FOR SCHOOL PRINCIPALS AND OTHER SCHOOL LEADERS
Available to the MSU Community : Citation: Stan Levenson, "A bigger piece of the pie", Principal Leadership, Volume 3, Issue 5 (Jan 2003): 14-18.
Secondary school principals are mighty busy these days, and obtaining grants and gifts for their schools is becoming a major part of their job descriptions. While public schools have been struggling to meet the needs of all students, private schools, colleges, universities, and nonprofit organizations have been successfully raising billions of dollars each year by tapping into corporations, foundations, the government, and most important, private citizens, for large grants and gifts.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING HELP FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/605-fundraising-help-from-local-businesses
Partnering with neighborhood businesses for donations, discounts, or manpower can increase fundraising resources -- and build a connection between the parent group and the community. Article by Emily Graham appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING IDEAS & PRODUCTS CENTER
http://www.fundraising-ideas.org/
Directory of fundraising companies offering traditional, unique and sometimes even bizarre fundraiser ideas for educators and other groups of all sizes and interests.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING IDEAS: 15 WAYS TO RAISE FUNDS FOR YOUR EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Internet Archive Link
1) Letter to friends and relatives
2) Form a support group
3) The Chain letter
4) Have a rummage sale
5) Grants from your school
6) Local businesses
7) Special Collection
8) Approach your local place of worship
9) Community groups
10) Support from employer and coworkers
11) Loans from relatives
12) Letters to alumni associations
13) Sell something door to door
14) Have a fundraising party
15) “Steal the gate” at a popular night spot
Courtesy of Mobility International USA. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

FUNDRAISING YELLOW PAGES
http://www.fundraising-yellow-pages.com/
Includes numerous products which schools and other small organizations can sell to raise money.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GET THAT GRANT! (Grades PreK-12)
Internet Archive Link
This resource is designed to help preK-12 teachers obtain grants. In the introduction, the author shares how she successfully acquired outside funds to build a computer lab at a poorly funded school. Among the pointers she offers for those seeking grants are to partner with other teachers, to inquire early about necessary paperwork, and to follow the three C's of grant proposal writing (clarify, capitalize, and capture). In the Web Resources section, numerous annotated links provide access to a wealth of information on grant writing and possible funding sources. Descriptions of books for those seeking grants are also included. Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), 2002. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GET THE GOLD : A PHYSICAL EDUCATOR'S GUIDE TO GRANT WRITING
Available to the MSU Commuity. Citation : Dennis Johnson and Tammy Schilling, "Get the gold: A physical educator's guide to grant writing", Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD), vol. 72, issue 3 (Mar 2001): 48-53+.
As we enter the 21st century, there is increasing pressure on public schools and teachers to demonstrate student competence. Numerous states and individual school systems currently use end-of-year tests to measure the progress of their students. These tests are designed to evaluate competence in the "academic" subjects (e.g., reading, writing, math, and science). Physical education and other so-called minor subjects (e.g., art, music, shop, home economics) receive little or no attention in these year-end assessments. In addition, these "minor" subject areas are generally the first to have their already depleted budgets slashed even further and the last to get funding for equipment and facility upgrades.
Physical educators have a variety of financial needs that must be met if they are to maintain a high-quality program. There are replacement supplies such as balls, nets, and hockey blades. Then there is new equipment to be purchased (e.g., balance beam, volleyball standards, tumbling mats). Physical educators often face dilemmas such as, "Do I order replacement balls or a new tennis net?" The possibility of purchasing roller blades to implement in-line skating or a climbing wall to expand the curriculum is but a dream for many of them. But does it have to be this way? Are there other options for physical educators interested in expanding their curriculum and obtaining more equipment?
This article provides a guide for obtaining "wish-list" items and facility upgrades. Grants are often available for such projects, especially if the funds will be used for both the school and the community or for after-school programs. Grants are often available for such projects, especially if the funds will be used for both the school and the community or for after-school programs. The process of procuring this external funding involves three basic steps:
(1) locating sources of funding,
(2) learning the application procedures and eligibility requirements, and
(3) writing and submitting a grant proposal.
Physical educators must be willing to invest significant time and effort in this process. In most cases, simply writing a grant proposal is not enough to procure funds. Rather, "there must be a process of planning, and of research on, outreach to, and cultivation of potential foundation and corporate donors".
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GETTING THE GRANT : A GUIDE TO SECURING ADDITIONAL FUNDS FOR AFTER SCHOOL EDUCATION AND SAFETY PROGRAMs
http://76.12.61.196/publications/FINA_GrantwritingGuide.pdf
An engaging, easy-to read publication providing California leaders in schools, school districts, and community-based organizations with simple, straightforward guidance on how to develop effective grant proposals to garner program support. Developed by The Finance Project, this guide outlines considerations for identifying and pursuing grant funding opportunities, reviews the key components of a grant proposal and offers concrete suggestions for making each section succinct and compelling. The guide also includes resources that provide examples of quality grant requests and additional information on funding sources and grant-writing. A compilation by Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finance Project, August 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GIVE YOUR FUNDRAISERS NEW LIFE
http://www.ptotoday.com/0303fatigue.html
Do your fundraisers generate little enthusiasm, even among your members? Here are some ways to bring back the excitement. Article by Sharron Kahn Luttrell, PTO Today, March 2003.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GO FOR THE GUSTO : HOW TO SNARE BIG GIFTS FROM INDIVIDUAL DONORS
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/Gusto.pdf
Convincing people that donating to schools is worthwhile is a major function of fundraising. Research potentional donors to learn about their interests and priorities before you ask for a donation. Be sure to acknowledge volunteers and donors for their contributions. Article appearing in Principal Leadership, November 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GOING AFTER GRANTS
Internet Archive Link
An experienced grant winner -- Tim Comolli -- shares his grant writing secrets in this January 2001 issue of Electronic School. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GOING FOR GRANTS
Internet Archive Link
Selected articles from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/
Advice from Stan Levenson.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT SEEKER'S VOCABULARY
Internet Archive Link
A compilation of terms and definitions by Harry Nelson, Columbia Education Center, Portland, Oregon.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT SEEKING PRIMER
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/grantprimer.htm
Practical advice adapted from Grantseeking Primer for Classroom Leaders (1994) by David Bauer sponsored by Scholastic.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING FOR EDUCATORS
http://users.rowan.edu/~kinseyj/GrantWriting/GrantWriting.htm
A powerpoint presentation by Joanne Kinsey, Rowan University College of Education in New Jersey.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING FOR MUSIC EDUCATORS
Internet Archive Link
In addition to teaching, music educators often find themselves saddled with a variety of other responsibilities that are time-consuming, but very important to the prosperity of their programs. One of those tasks is grant-writing. When extra funding is needed to pursue a special project outside the day-to-day operation of the music program (above and beyond fundraising efforts), many directors turn to grant-makers for financial support. But the process is complicated, and every grant opportunity has a sea of applicants vying for attention. Advice from School Band and Orchestra, January 2002, pp. 31-34. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHERS
http://712educators.about.com/od/grantwriting/Grant_Writing.htm
A collection of advice and resources from About.com
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING GUIDE
http://kurzweiledu.com/files/proof_resources_grant2.pdf
A guide to preparing successful grantwriting proposals by Kurzweil Educational Services. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT-WRITING PRECISION: DESIGNING YOUR PROPOSAL
Internet Archive Link
This article presents a sample grant, glossary, and list of resources to help improve your grant-writing process. Part two of a two-part series appearing in Today's School by Carolyn Ross Tomlin. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT-WRITING PRECISION PAYS OFF
Internet Archive Link
Your school can benefit from thousands on ongoing grant opportunities. An experienced grant writer takes you through the steps. Part one of a two-part series appearing in Today's School by Carolyn Ross Tomlin. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3564&FullBreadCrumb=%3Ca+href%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.scholastic.com%2Fbrowse%2Fsearch%2F%3Fquery%3Dgrant%2Bwriting%26Ntt%3Dgrant%2Bwriting%26Ntk%3DSCHL30_SI%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchallpartial%26N%3D0%22+class%3D%22endecaAll%22%3EAll+Results%3C%2Fa%3E
Grant writing is a challenge for both novice and experienced writers. Grants are highly competitive, and rejection is disappointing. To avoid undue stress, realize that your proposal may be funded or it may not. A grant proposal is similar to a personal résumé; you have only one chance to make a good impression and grab the reviewers' attention. Here are some helpful hints to ensure that your proposal is effective and competitive. Advice from Scholastic Magazine.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT WRITING TIPS (FOR TEACHERS)
Internet Archive Link
Although Learning Space closed in October, 2004, these tips are still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANT-WRITING TOOLS FROM THE WEB
Internet Archive Link
This article offers concrete ideas about writing a proposal for a grant. According to the author, one piece of advice common to most grant-writing guides is to read very carefully the request for proposal (RFP) and any proposal submission instructions. The article features links to six helpful web sites. For each site there is a summary of information and one pertinent grant-writing tip. The author cautions the reader to allow time to tour several of the suggested web sites before creating a personal step-by-step procedure for grant writing. The article closes with a link to a site offering a self-assessment tool for reviewing a proposal before submission. Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), 2000. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANTIONARY: A GLOSSARY OF TERMS RELATED TO GRANTS AND FUNDING
http://www.eduplace.com/grants/help/grantionary.html
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANTS AND GRANTWRITING: WHERE TO FIND MONEY TO ENHANCE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
Internet Archive Link
A web page originally created by Nancy Powell, Bloomington High School, Bloomington, Illinois, back in 1997 and still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Includes:

Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GRANTS: BEYOND THE MONEY
Internet Archive Link
Grant proposals can be used as a vehicle for change. Written by Alan November in February 1993 when he was technology consultant for the Glenbrook High Schools, Glenview/Northbrook, Illinois. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

GREAT LAKES SCRIP CENTER
http://www.glscrip.com/
Scrip is a term that means "substitute money". When you purchase scrip, you're purchasing negotiable gift certificates and prepaid cards that are used just like cash You can use scrip to purchase everyday expenses like food, clothing, and other essentials, and with every purchase, you earn revenue for the church, school, or nonprofit organization of your choice.
The reason for the effectiveness of scrip is simple: families generate revenue through purchases they would make anyway. Groceries, clothing, toys, gifts, even gasoline can be purchased with scrip. An organization of 150 families easily spends between one and two million dollars per year on food, clothing and other essentials. If these families use scrip for these purchases, they can raise as much as $40,000 to $80,000 per year for their organization --without spending an additional penny.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

A GUIDE TO WINNING GRANTS FOR MATH AND SCIENCE EDUCATION:
WHERE TO LOOK AND HOW TO WIN
Internet Archive Link
This website is designed to aid teachers, school districts and others in seeking and winning education grants. Information provided includes: (1) Tips to winning grants; (2) Listings of selected non-federal grant opportunities; and (3) Links to other sites that provide advice on grant writing. This is not a comprehensive list of all grants available. Rather it is a resource guide that provides some specific grant opportunities. Prepared by the Triangle Coalition. Written by LaRae White, Arthur Livermore. 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

HIGH SCHOOL BOOSTER CLUBS WITH POSTED GRANT POLICIES
(1) Helena High Bengal Booster Club Funding Guidelines and Request Form
(Last checked 07/10/13)

HOW TO GET A FIPSE GRANT
http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/fipse/howtoget.html
By Eulalia Benejam Cobb, former Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education Program Officer.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

HOW TO RUN A SUCCESSFUL CAR WASH FUNDRAISER
http://www.carwashguys.com/fundraisers/LAschools.html
Practical advice from Lance Winslow III, founder of the Car Wash Guys.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRANT READER
http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.php?articleID=164300838
We've all done it. We've labored for days over a grant proposal, treating it tenderly like a child, and with hope in our hearts, sent it off to fame and fortune. Then comes that gray day when the rejection letter arrives. They called our "baby" ugly! When it comes to grant writing one thing is certain: once you send in your application, its fate is at the mercy of the readers who pick it up at the other end. At that point, there is nothing that you can do to impact the future of your grant. However, before you place the fateful stamp on the envelope and drive to the post office, there are things you can do to improve your odds. Chief among them is looking at the grant process from the reader's point of view. By getting inside the minds of the readers during the writing process, you will craft a better proposal and ultimately up the chances of getting your "baby" funded. Carol A. Kerney. TechLearning.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

INTERNET FUNDRAISING REVISITED
Internet Archive Link
In less than one year - decades in Internet time - a whole new category of school fundraising has emerged promising to revolutionize the bake sale and erase memories of door-to-door selling. What's this Internet Fundraising craze all about? And should your PTO jump onboard? Article by Tim Sullivan appearing in Vol. 1, Issue 3, Jan/Feb 2000, of PTO Today. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

KENT ISD GRANTS AND RESOURCES WEB PAGE
http://www.kentisd.org/administrative-services/grants--resources/
Publish a weekly newsletter sharing leads and other information.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

KEYS TO FUNDRAISING SUCCESS
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/24-keys-to-fundraising-success
Taking a businesslike approach to fundraising can lead to higher profits, less burnout, and better parent involvement. Article by Evelyn Beck appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MAKE LOCAL BUSINESSES A RESOURCE
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/411-make-local-businesses-a-resource
With the right approach, companies in your neighborhood can become great partners for fundraisers and other events. Article by Evelyn Beck appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MAKING THE GRADE : PUBLIC SCHOOLS RAISE MILLIONS WITH SOPHISTICATED TECHNIQUES
Internet Archive Link
In a growing number of cities and towns, fund raising for public schools is becoming increasingly ambitious and sophisticated. Many school districts have full-time fund raisers. As local governments face serious budget shortfalls, more public schools will be competing for philanthropic dollars. Nicole Lewis, The Chronicle of Philanthropy; Aug 21, 2003. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MAKING THE MATCH : FINDING FUNDING FOR AFTER SCHOOL EDUCATION AND SAFETY PROGRAMS
http://76.12.61.196/publications/MakingTheMatch.pdf
A user-friendly guide designed to assist California leaders in schools, school districts, and community-based organizations address the challenge of meeting the ASES Program matching requirement. Developed by The Finance Project, this guide helps ASES grantee and program leaders think strategically about what funding they need, what resources they currently have and how to fill any gaps in funding. It presents four strategies for generating matching funds: accessing school and community resources, accessing business and foundation support, accessing local government resources and accessing state and federal funding. Potential partners, the types of support they provide and tips for accessing these resources are presented for each strategy, with examples from programs throughout California illustrating how these strategies are being implemented. A compilation by Kate Sandel, Cheryl Hayes, Brittany Anuszkiewicz, Carol Cohen and Sharon Deich, The Finance Project, August 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MICHIGAN COMMON APPLICATION FORM
http://www.michiganfoundations.org/s_cmf/bin.asp?CID=516&DID=10304&DOC=FILE.DOC
Also listed on the CMF Resources and Publications Page
Many Michigan foundations have adopted a common application form for grant seekers to use when applying for funding. Check the site for the form and a list of foundations requiring it. Courtesy of the Council of Michigan Foundations.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
GRANTS AND FINANCES
http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-5236---,00.html
Provides current information on the various grant programs administered by the Michigan Department of Education and other sources. School districts will find an electronic Consolidated Grant Application Request Form to facilitate their search for funding as well as links to other information resources related to school funding in Michigan. High school and college students will find information about the Mi-Cashe program.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MIDDLESCHOOL.NET GRANTS PAGE
http://www.middleschool.net/prodevlo/grants.htm
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT)
http://www.edutopia.org/money-thats-what-i-want
Presents ten tips on how to write grant proposals that get funded. Victor Rivero, Edutopia; v1 n1 , p24 ; Sep-Oct 2004.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

MOVING A SCHOOL DISTRICT INTO BIG-TIME FUND RAISING
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/MoveIntoBigTimeFundRaising.htm
Fund raising is a billion dollar business in America, but the public schools have been slow to jump on the bandwagon. If public schools are to compete for needed dollars with private schools, colleges, universities and nonprofit organizations, superintendents and their staffs must aggressively apply the fund-raising strategies used so effectively by these other organizations. Article by Stan Levenson appearing in School Administrator, Dec. 2001.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

NATIONAL SCHOOL BOARDS FOUNDATION EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP TOOL KIT FUNDING MODULE
http://www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/Funding.html
Use the resources in this module to find innovative ways of funding technology initiatives in your district as well as linking to the numerous resources available for grants and other funding programs. Funding module sections include:
(1) Funding Technology
(2) Developing Your Funding Approach, and
(3) Funding Resources
(Last checked 07/10/13)

NATIONAL SCHOOL FOUNDATIONS ASSOCIATION
http://www.schoolfoundations.org/
Offer webinars on fundraising for a fee as well as a few free video presentations.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PARENTS ARE GOING BEYOND BAKE SALES TO HELP SUPPORT PUBLIC EDUCATION
http://www.parenthood.com/article-topics/parents_are_going_beyond_bake_sales_to_help_support_public_education.html
In Oregon, parents have been selling their blood plasma to keep teachers working. In Florida, they’re promoting “License for Learning” license plates to raise funds. In Massachusetts, the Lexington Education Foundation has been holding an annual trivia contest to raise money for teacher training and school computers, asking questions like: “Who said, ‘The only thing I do not want to be called is First Lady. It sounds like a horse.’?” (The answer, by the way, is Jacqueline Kennedy.)
The means may be unorthodox, but the end is universal – more money is needed to fund education on both the state and local levels. With federal, state and municipal budgets squeezed to the brink – and with equally strapped taxpayers unwilling to override local revenue limits to help schools meet their operating expenses – parents and education advocates are increasingly taking matters into their own hands. Article by Judy Molland, Parenthood.com
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PLAYING THE GRANT GAME
LIMITED FUNDING SPARKS FIERCE SCHOOL COMPETITION
Available on microfilm in larger libraries like the Michigan State University Main Library.
As school budget cuts intensify the battle for the $1 billion available in vital federal grant money, smaller mid-Michigan school districts find they can't compete. Some school administrators say they have neither the time nor the resources to contend with larger and richer districts with grant-writing teams and other advantages. Without those grants, educators say, students won't get the services that enrich their everyday learning - from after-school initiatives that keep youth out of trouble to literacy activities that keep them reading. And with budget cuts looming in nearly every local district, little is left to pay for the services. Article by Adam Emerson appearing in the Lansing State Journal, August 17, 2003.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PRINCIPALS DO THE DARNDEST THINGS
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/614-principals-do-the-darndest-things
Crazy principal antics to encourage student involvement in a PTO fundraiser just might get your school featured in the local newspaper. Article by Emily Graham appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

A PROGRAM THAT PAYS
http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/ProgramThatPays.pdf
Caught in a budget crunch? Developing a large-scale fund raising program could be the answer to your woes. Article by Stan Levenson appearing in American School Board Journal, July 2008.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/propdevguide_13484_7.pdf
A guide prepared for organizations interested in applying for grants from the Michigan Department of Education. For more information, contact the Office of Grants and Technology at (517) 373-1806.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PTO TODAY FUNDRAISING ARCHIVE
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/category/182-Fundraising?limit=all
A collection of articles from PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

PUBLIC EDUCATION NETWORK
STARTING A LOCAL EDUCATION FUND (LEF)
http://web.archive.org/web/20101128020313/http://publiceducation.org/becomeanLEF_startLEF.asp
The Public Education Network, a national association of 89 local education funds working to improve public school quality in low-income communities nationwide, offers this advice on starting a local education fund.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SALES FUNDRAISERS : THE BASICS
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/216-sales-fundraisers-the-basics
While new fundraising options get the publicity, product sales are still the backbone for parent groups. Here's what you should know before you begin. Article by by Tim Sullivan appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SAMPLE FEDERAL GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.coloradogrants.org/lightsville.html
A sample proposal prepared by Grants West of Denver, Colorado, for the Lightsville Public Schools.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL
Internet Archive Link
Courtesy of the Minneapolis Public Schools. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL
LIGHTSVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
http://coloradogrants.org/assets/pdf/lightsville-public-schools.pdf
A federal grant proposal prepared by Colorado Grants.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSALS
Also listed as SCHOOLGRANTS SUCCESSFUL GRANT PROPOSALS
http://www.k12grants.org/samples/samples_index.htm
SchoolGrants receives many requests from people wishing to see examples of successful grant proposals. Several generous grant-writers have shared successful proposals they've written. A very special thanks is extended to each person who has been willing to assist others in the SchoolGrants community by contributing their grant applications.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOL FOUNDATION LINKS
Sample school foundations in the Detroit metropolitan area include:
Berkley Education Foundation
Birmingham Education Foundation
Center Line Public Schools Educational Foundation
Chippewa Valley Schools Educational Foundation
Dearborn Education Foundation
Hazel Park Educational Foundation
Livonia Public Schools Foundation
Northville Educational Foundation
Rochester Community Schools Foundation
Troy Foundation for Educational Excellence
Warren Consolidated Schools Educational Foundation
Waterford Foundation for Public Education
West Bloomfiled Eduational Foundation

Samples school foundation in the Lansing metropolitan area include:
DeWitt Public Schools Foundation
East Lansing Educational Foundation
Foundation for Haslett Schools
Holt Education Foundation
Laingsburg Educational Advancement Foundation
Lansing Educational Achievement Foundation
Mason Public Schools Foundation
Okemos Education Foundation
St. Johns Schools Foundation for Excellence
Waverly Education Foundation
Williamston Community Schools Foundation : the first school foundation established in Michigan (1981)

Additional locations:
Adrian Schools Educational Foundation
Ann Arbor Public Schools Educational Foundation
Chelsea Education Foundation
Comstock Park Educational Foundation
East Grand Rapids Schools Foundation
Genesee County Educational Foundation
Genesee County Educational Foundation
Grand Rapids Student Advancement Foundation
Hudson Education Foundation
Kentwood Public Schools Education Foundation
L'Anse Creuse Foundation
Lakeshore Excellence Foundation
Lakeview School District Education Foundation
Mason County Central Schools Educational Foundation
Novi Educational Foundation
Portage Education Foundation
St. Joseph Public Schools Foundation
Walled Lakes Foundation Zeeland Education Foundation
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOL FOUNDATIONS ARE BECOMING MORE CRITICAL IN RAISING ADDITIONAL FUNDS FOR MICHIGAN SCHOOLS
web link
A sample entry from the Grants and Related Resource Blog.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOL-FUNDRAISERS.COM
http://www.School-Fundraisers.com
A company specializing in fundraising programs for the educational industry. We work with elementary schools, middle schools, high schools and even colleges. From school bands to sports teams to academic clubs. For more information contact Jeff Sirlin, jsfundraising@hotmail.com.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOL FUND-RAISING ACTIVITIES THAT WORK
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/school_fund_raising.htm
Advice from Gary Carnow sponsored by Scholastic. With a minimal amount of effort, your school can make a great deal of money. Walkathons, jogathons, and other "-athons" all share the same basic format. Students gather pledges (from friends, neighbors, and relatives) for the number of laps they might walk or jog. The donor has the option of making a set contribution or a contribution based on the number of laps completed.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOLGRANTS
http://www.k12grants.org/
SchoolGrants was created in 1999 as a way to share grant information with PK-12 educators. Grant writing can be intimidating to those who are new at it. SchoolGrants helps ease those fears by providing online tips to those who need them. Finding suitable grant opportunities requires a great deal of time and research - SchoolGrants reduces the effort by listing a variety of opportunities available to public and private nonprofit elementary and secondary schools and districts across the United States. .
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOLGRANTS SUCCESSFUL GRANT PROPOSALS
http://www.k12grants.org/samples/samples_index.htm
SchoolGrants receives many requests from people wishing to see examples of successful grant proposals. Several generous grant-writers have shared successful proposals they've written. A very special thanks is extended to each person who has been willing to assist others in the SchoolGrants community by contributing their grant applications.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

A SCHOOL GRANTWRITER'S GUIDE TO PLANNING COMPETITIVE PROPOSALS
Internet Archive Link
A guide provided by the Chicago Public Schools.
Contents include:
(1) What are proposals all about? : A brief introduction to proposal development, possible funding sources, and other topics covered in this guide.
(2) What needs to be fixed? : Useful information to help proposal developers identify and clarify the problem to be addressed.
(3) Where do you want to be? : A guide to help proposal developers identify and write program goals and objectives.
(4) How do you intend to reach your goal? : Identifying and evaluating alternative approaches to solving the problem and developing a successful program.
(5) How do you know when you've reached your goal? : Suggestions to assist program planners in developing assessment procedures to determine if the program has achieved its desired results.
(6) How much will the program cost? : Discussion of budget development in terms of available resources, in-kind contributions, anticipated staff and facilities, and additional materials and supplies.
(7) What's next? : Additional information for proposal developers, including tips on reading requests for proposals (RFPs) and pitfalls to be avoided in proposal development. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCHOOLS GO BEYOND BAKE SALES AS FOR FUNDRAISING
http://web.archive.org/web/20070302204443/http://www.cnn.com/2003/EDUCATION/02/13/fund.raising.ap/
The nonprofit Association of Fund-Raising Distributors and Suppliers estimated that schools and parents nationwide raised nearly $2 billion for field trips, supplies and other classroom needs by selling magazines, candy and other products in 2003. But that doesn't include the pledge drives, reunions and auctions some fund-raisers now rely on to bring in more money. Foundations and endowments, long a staple for private schools, have become part of a national trend in public-school funding. And many schools turn increasingly to donated dollars to expand their facilities, upgrade technology or even pay teachers. "We are seeing money being channeled into core instruction areas — textbooks, teacher salaries, teacher training, technology," said Howard Schaffer, spokesman for the Public Education Fund Network, which tracks school fund-raisers. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SCRIP FUNDRAISING : PROCEED WITH CAUTION
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/362-scrip-fundraising-proceed-with-caution
It has a funny name and a checkered history, but scrip fundraising can be a powerful tool. Article by Alicia Miller and Tim Sullivan appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SOLICITING FUNDING FROM COMMUNITY SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.academicinnovations.com/cso.html
Many people in business are interested in helping young people prepare for the working world. So, if you haven't already, why not consider recruiting one of the service organizations in your community to sponsor your school's program, such as Rotary, the Soroptimists, or Kiwanis. Tips from Academic Innovations, 1998.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SPIRITWARE : GIVE THEM WHAT THEY WANT
http://www.ptotoday.com/0103spiritwear.html
Kids love fun spiritwear. Keep them happy and get the most for your money. Article by Karen Nerney, PTO Today, March 2001.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

ST. CLAIR COUNTY INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT GRANT WRITING TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
Internet Archive Link
Also provides links to a few grant programs of particular interest to schools in the St. Clair County area. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

ST. CLAIR COUNTY REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICE AGENCY
http://www.sccresa.org/resources/grants/
If you're seeking funding for a special project, have a potential funding source and want help writing or editing your proposal, or simply want to learn about the grant writing and reviewing process, here are some resources that might help.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

STARTING A SCHOOL FOUNDATION
http://www.nsba.org/MainMenu/SchoolBoardPolicies/Newsletters/LeadershipInsiderJanuary2004.aspx
What you should know before you start fundraising. Advice from kate Coventry, National School Boards Assocation, January 2004.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

STARTING A SCHOOL FOUNDATION
http://www.schoolfoundations.org/en/starting_a_foundation/
What you should know before you start fundraising. National School Foundations Association.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

STARTING THE GRANTS SEARCH: SEVEN STEPS
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/grantsearch.htm
If you can write a lesson plan, you can write a grant. Finding solutions to educational problems is challenging and exciting, and being awarded a grant is great recognition of your talent and ability. To get the "edge" on what grants are available, I suggest you take the following steps. Practical advice from Gary A. Carnow sponsored by Scholastic.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SUCCEEDING IN A CROWDED SALES MARKETPLACE
http://www.ptotoday.com/pto-today-articles/article/350-succeeding-in-a-crowded-sales-marketplace
How to maximize your profits at a time when more organizations are fundraising more frequently than ever. Article by by Emily Graham appearing in PTO Today.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

SUSTAINABLE FUNDING: WHAT TO DO BEFORE THE MONEY RUNS OUT
Internet Archive Link
Many schools and districts look to grants and foundations as sources of funding for technological projects. Then the money runs out. Here's some advice on finding continuing sources of funding. Article by Deborah Ward in School Planning & Management, April 2001. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TEACHER TAP : GRANTS AND GRANT WRITING RESOURCES
http://www.eduscapes.com/tap/topic94.htm
A compilation of professional development resources for teachers and librarians.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TECHLEARNING FUNDING ARTICLES
http://www.techlearning.com
Provides leads on funding opportunities and related information. Check out the July 2013 issue for example.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TECH-SAVVY PTAS OUTGROW THE LEMONDADE STAND
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/webguide/internetlife/2007-03-09-pta-sites_N.htm
In an increasingly wired world, parent-teacher associations (PTAs) — the traditional purveyors of cookie and lemonade stands — have morphed into sophisticated, technology-oriented organizations. They still sell baked goods, but do it far more efficiently by using online tools to coordinate and promote those and other efforts. Source : USA Today, March 9, 2007.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TIPS FOR GRANTSEEKERS
Internet Archive Link
Teachers in active learning classrooms often have more good ideas than they do money. Generally, schools or school districts do not have additional money or are reluctant to allocate it for classroom projects. So, oftentimes, it is up to teachers to seek the money they need to carry out their ideas. The good news is that many grantmakers are eager to fund creative, hand-on learning opportunities. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TOP TEACHING RESOURCES : GRANT AND FUNDING RESOURCES
http://www.topteachingresources.com/grants_funding.php
A fairly extensive compilation.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TOP TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING
http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/fundraisingtips.htm
Includes: Top Tips for Proposal Writers, Top Tips to Sharpen Your Proposal, Top Tips for Grant Budgets, Top Tips for Communicating With Potential Funders, and Top Tips to Prove You are Credible. Courtesy of Gary Carnow, Director of Technology and Information Services for the Alhambra School District in the Los Angeles area, and Scholastic.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

TRAVEL FUNDRAISING IDEAS FOR STUDENTS
http://www.acis.com/studentsparents/fundraising.cfm
Sponsored by American Institute for Foreign Study.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

WASHTENAW INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT
GRANTS AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
CORPORATE LETTER
http://www.wash.k12.mi.us/grants/grantletter.cfm
Sometimes a long proposal is unnecessary. It isn't the length of a proposal, but the content, that sells a project. Sometimes the list of "stuff" needed to accomplish the project is relatively short, and there is a source in the area which could provide all that is needed. Perhaps pens, pencils and paper for homeless students is needed and there is an office supply store a few blocks from the elementary school. Perhaps simple ingredients are needed by the latch-key program so students can learn how to fix healthy snacks for themselves when parents are unavailable, and a grocery store is located a mile away. Millions of dollars are awarded by corporations, businesses and foundations every year on the basis of a one or two-page letter.
(Last checked 07/10/13)

WASHTENAW INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT
GRANTS AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
GRANTWRITING MANUAL
http://www.wash.k12.mi.us/grants/grantmanual.cfm
(Last checked 07/10/13)

WASHTENAW INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT
GRANTS AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
ORGANIZING THE GRANTWRITING PROCESS
http://www.wash.k12.mi.us/grants/grantprocess.cfm
In an effort to provide organizational tools for every learning style, we have collected a selection of checklists for use in organizing the grantwriting process. These are adaptations of documents used by real non-profit groups and school districts. Some were developed by grantwriting departments, and others were written by individuals. Take a look at these examples. They are in pdf form on this website and can be downloaded and printed as they appear on your screen. Then modify them to suit your own style and needs. The bottom line is that a good grant proposal is the product of planning and a compilation of information from many sources. These charts should help organize the final product. Includes:

  • Is This Grant For Us? A Checklist (PDF)
  • Proposal Coordination Plan (PDF)
  • Grants Process Log (PDF)
  • Grant Coordinator's Checklist (PDF)
  • Proposal Development Guide and Checklist (PDF)
  • Grants Checklist (PDF)
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WAYNE COUNTY REGIONAL EDUCATION SERVICE AGENCY (RESA)
    SEARCHING FOR DOLLARS
    http://www.resa.net/services/grants/newsletters/
    A powerpoint presentation.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WHAT DO WINNING PROPOSALS HAVE IN COMMON?
    http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/grants/WinningProposals.htm
    Gary Carnow identifies ten common elements. Courtesy of Scholastic.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WHAT SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT ED GRANTS?
    http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/about/knowabtgrants/index.html?exp=0
    The Information contained in this booklet (September 1998) is a non-technical summary of the Department of Education's discretionary grants process and the laws and regulations that govern it.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WHY PROPOSALS GET REJECTED
    http://www.teachnet.org/grants/Howto/Rejected/
    Courtesy of TeachNet.Org.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WINNING GRANT$
    Internet Archive Link
    This web site by Sylvia Bienvenu, one of the resources available at the Louisiana Technology Resource Center, provides advice to school teachers and administrators on how to go about identifying resources on and how to write winning grants to obtain information technology. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WRITING EFFECTIVE PROPOSALS
    Internet Archive Link
    Are you writing an application, plan, or proposal in response to state or federal requirements? This information will help you make it readable and educationally sound. Advice from the California Department of Education. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WRITING SUCCESSFUL GRANTS KNOWLEDGEBASE
    http://www.mc3edsupport.org/community/knowledgebases/Project-4.html
    Sponsored by the Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center, a regional education agency, this site is designed to assist educators with developing a project, writing for funding, and managing grant awards.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    WRITING YOUR FIRST SUCCESSFUL GRANT APPLICATION
    http://www.grantsandgiftsforschools.com/WritingYourFirstGrant.htm
    Writing your first successful grant application takes time, understanding and effort. I have been writing grant applications for more than 30 years. A number of my applications have been successful, and some have gone over like a lead balloon. I will focus in this article on the things that I have learned along the way that will encourage a funding agency to part with their money in your behalf. Article by Stan Levenson appearing in Teacher's Planet, Feb. 24, 2003.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)


    Books

    The books mentioned on this page are available for public use in the Michigan State University Libraries. If you are unable to visit our library, consider visiting a Foundation Center Cooperating Collection in your home state or a local public library in your home town. If the books are not available there, ask about interlibrary loan or visit a local bookstore to find out whether they can be purchased.

    BEYOND THE BAKE SALE : THE ULTIMATE SCHOOL FUND-RAISING BOOK. Jean C. Joachim. St. Martin's Griffin, 2003. 209pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .J63 2003
    Education budgets across the country have been slashed, and parents of children in both public and private schools every-where are taking up the slack. Parents want their children's classrooms stocked with computers and their libraries filled with books. They would like to restore art and music programs. They also want to supplement the money available for field trips and sports equipment. Jean Joachim is an innovative fundraiser who has compiled foolproof methods from across the country that will raise the maximum amount of money for any elementary or secondary school. Beyond the Bake Sale is the first book to show parents how to: -Turn less prominent holidays like Cinco de Mayo or Presidents' Day into moneymaking opportunities -Sell school supplies, candy, and wrapping paper and take a percentage of the proceeds for their school -Organize a flea market, street fair, or harvest festival -Put on dances and other old-fashioned entertainments to benefit parents associations -Utilize student power in the community, by painting holiday window displays, handing out flyers, washing cars, and more.
    [Eductional fund raising -- handbooks, manuals, etc.]

    BIG-TIME FUNDRAISING FOR TODAY'S SCHOOLS. Stanley Levenson. Thousand Oaks, CA : Corwin Press, 2007. 187pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243 .L488 2007
    This book provides guidance on fundraising from foundations, corporations, individuals, and government agencies. In addition to the information about preparing applications and proposals, Levenson also discusses the role of principals, teachers, parents, and volunteers in the process. Includes examples of winning grant proposals, techniques for preparing a budget, tips for how to win grants and overcome obstacles, reproducible marketing documents, campaigns, and scripts, list of 101 foundations and corporations interested in giving to schools, examples of job ads for development positions, and an extensive bibliography.
    [Educational fund raising -- United States]
    [Proposal writing for grants -- United States]
    [Education -- United States -- Finance]

    CREATING A SCHOOL FOUNDATION : HOW TO DEVELOP NEW FUNDING SOURCES FOR YOUR DISTRICT. Roberta Weiner. Alexandria, Va. : Capitol Publications Inc., 1992. 65pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243 .A1 W45 1992
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Public Schools -- United States -- finance]
    [Endowments -- United States]

    CREATING AND FUNDING EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS : A GUIDE FOR LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS. James J. Muro. Boston, Mass. : Allyn & Bacon, 1995. 256pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2825 .M789 1995
    Faced by the need to do more with reduced budgets, many school districts are finding educational foundations an attractive option. These private foundations have enabled concerned citizens in many communities to raise additional funds for educational programs, projects, partnerships, and staff development not funded by tax support. This book offers a complete guide to creating and operating a private educational foundation in any school district.
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Education -- United States - finance]
    [Public Schools -- United States -- finance]
    [Endowments -- United States]

    CREATING FOUNDATIONS FOR AMERICAN SCHOOLS. Dan H. McCormick, David G. Bauer, and Daryl E. Ferguson. Gaithersburg, Md. : Aspen, 2001. 246pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 M33 2001
    Unless you can reach beyond property-tax funding, your budget can't reach much beyond teacher salaries and building maintenance. But across America, schools and districts are doing more--creating foundations to raise funds for everything from bricks-and-mortar projects to scholarships to after-school enrichment. With guidance from America's most-experienced foundation development consultants, Creating Foundations for American Schools provides the know-how and tools K-12 schools and districts need to build the types of foundations colleges and universities use so successfully to raise money-and standards!
    [Educational Fund Raising]

    DEVELOPING SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING : INITIATIVES FOR RURAL AND SMALL SCHOOLS . Robert Carlson. [Charleston, W. Va.] : ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, [1993] 3pp. ERIC Microfiche Collection, 2nd floor, West Wing, ED357910
    Also available in the Government Documents Library U.S. Documents Microfiche Collection ED 1.331/2:EDO-RC-93-4
    Lists fundraising strategies for rural and small schools.
    [Educational fund raising]

    EDUCATION GRANTSEEKER'S GUIDE TO FOUNDATION AND CORPORATE FUNDING. Jacqueline Ferguson. Alexandria, Va. : Capital Publications, Inc., 1995. 2nd edition, 223pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2825 .F452 1995
    A step-by-step guide to identifying potential funding sources, researching their interests and giving patterns, contacting their staff for information and advice, preparing and submitting proposals, and managing a private sector grant. Also includes 220 profiles of foundations and corporations that support elementary and secondary education nationally, regionally, and locally.
    Also listed under Fundraising for Educators
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Corporations -- United States -- charitable contributions]

    EDUCATION GRANTWINNERS : MODELS OF EFFECTIVE PROPOSAL STRUCTURE AND STYLE. Leslie A. Ratzlaff, ed. Alexandria, Va. : Capitol Publications, Inc., 1991. 385pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .E48 1991 (Lost : try Interlibrary loan)(
    Contains excerpts from nine proposals that won grants from the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The proposals come from a variety of sources ranging from school districts, community colleges, four-year colleges and universitiess and describe projects ranging from teen parent support to a college freshman advising system and from a summer science program for girls to a multigrade international education curriculum.
    Also listed under Academic Fundraising and Fundraising for Educators.
    [Educational fund raising]

    FUND-RAISING. Irene Cumming Kleeburg. New York, N.Y. : F. Watts, 1988. 64pp. Funding Center (1 East) HG177 .K54 1988
    Briefly describes ways for a school or class within a school to raise money for various activities, such as class trips or to help charities.
    [Fund raising]
    [Money making projects for children]

    FUND-RAISING BY PARENT / CITIZEN GROUPS. The National Committee for Citizens in Education. Columbia, Md. : The Committee, 1977. 52pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2336 .F86
    A guide to raising money for local schools from the private sector -- individuals, foundations, and corporations.
    Also listed under Fundraising for educators.
    [Educational fund raising]

    FUND-RAISING PRIMER : A FIRST BOOK FOR INDIVIDUALS INVOLVED IN RAISING FUNDS FOR NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS. David G. Bauer. New York, N.Y. : Scholastic Inc., 1993. 115pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .B38 1993
    Designed for use by staff members, volunteers, and board members who are unfamiliar with basic fund-raising principles. Discusses sources of contributions, how to develop a fund-raising plan and identify potential donor groups, motivations for giving, building a donor base, and fund-raising ethics. Demonstrates how to perform cost analysis of various activities as well as suggests particular activities for board members and staff. Includes brief descriptions of special events, direct mail, cause-related marketing, personal solicitation, annual giving, memorials, telemarketing, capital campaigns, planned giving, and foundation and corporate grants.
    [Educational fund raising]

    FUNDRAISING TIPS AND TACTICS : A PRACTICAL GUIDEBOOK FOR DEVELOPING NEW FUNDS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS AND PROGRAMS IN YOUR SCHOOLS. Rockville, Md. : NSPRA. Funding Center (1 East) LB2342 .F87 2004
    You know the challenges. Budgets are tight. Programs are threatened. And more and more, anxious administrators, boards and parents look to the school PR staff for creative, new fundraising ideas to help raise cash and help kids. That’s why NSPRA has published this exciting new guide. It’s packed with the idea-starters and hands-on advice you asked for. You’ll find step-by-step advice on: How fundraising and PR can partner; How to start a fundraising program; Developing Your Plan; Targeting Prospects; Building a budget; Linking with businesses; Going after foundations; Preparing proposals; Managing ethical problems; Issues to watch; and much, much more!! The Special Report offers easy-to-follow tips and suggestions to help you build a fundraising plan that works. Plus, it offers scores of specific fundraising events and activities that you can use to bring money in now! That’s what makes this report so exciting -- and so valuable to experienced and novice fundraisers alike. Sure, it gives you many, many sound ideas you can use to build a long-term program to pay big dividends to you and your schools for years to come. But it also gives you an arsenal of tried-and-tested events and projects that you can quickly implement to start bringing in badly needed funds for your schools and their programs. Imagine how you could use tools like these... More than 100 fundraising ideas for you to use right now! Ideas on: “A-Thons”; Affinity Cards; Alumni Clubs; Art Auctions; Meet-the-Author Events; Box Top Programs; Calendars; Celebrity Programs; Cook Offs; Concession Stands; Coupon Books; Sweepstakes; Scavenger Hunts; Pizza Deliveries; Restaurant Tie-Ins; Magazine Sales; E-Pay Programs; For-Profit Ventures; Galas; Holiday Services; Recycling Programs; Much, Much More!! Plus you’ll find: sample solicitation letters for annual commitments, specific programs, specific events and more; sample sponsorship agreements; sample policies; sample plans; and more.
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Fund raising]

    GETTING THE GRANT: HOW EDUCATORS CAN WRITE WINNING PROPOSALS AND MANAGE SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS. Rebecca Gadja. Alexandria, Va. : Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. 2005. viii, 116 p. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 G35 2005
    A basic primer on grantseeking from government and private funders, with emphasis on developing the proposal or responding to a request for proposals. One chapter deals with evaluation methods and another with collaborations, which are both components of a proposal that grantseekers need to address. With glossary and bibliographical references.
    [Educational fund raising]

    GRANT PROPOSALS : A PRIMER FOR WRITERS. Emily Duncan Mathis and John Edward Doody. Washington, D.C. : National Catholic Educational Association, 1994. 56pp. Funding Center (1 East) LB2342.4 .U6 M38 1994
    Focuses on preparing a grant proposal for elementary and secondary school projects.
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing for grants]
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Catholic schools - finance]

    GRANT SEEKING PRIMER FOR CLASSROOM LEADERS. David G. Bauer. New York, N.Y. : Scholastic Press, 1999. 131pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .B387 1999
    1994 edition also available.
    Provides tips on how to determine your chances of success before you invest your valuable time; make pre-proposal contact with funders; identify who will evaluate your proposal and the scoring system they will utilize; organize your proposal and develop a budget; obtain copies of funded proposals; write a cogent, well-prepared proposal; successfully obtain funds by implementing a pro-active grants effort; efficiently implement your proposal.
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing for grants]

    GRANT WRITING FOR EDUCATORS : PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND STAFF. Beverly A. Browning. Bloomington, IN : National Education Service, 2005. 121pp. Funding Center (1 East0 LB2342.4 .U6 B76 2005
    Provides educators with an abundant amount of information for dramatically improving their grant writing skills and for increasing their odds of receiving much-desired awards. The chapters are filled with expertise, encouragement, and solutions for educators who ask, "How can we get this done?" Readers will learn how to : (1) Identify needs; (2) Recognized and find corporate, foundation, and government funders; (3) Deal with the paperwork; (4) Write winning grant proposals following funder's directions to a T; and (5) Find more money for their school or corporation.
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing in grants--U.S.--handbooks, manuals, etc.]

    GRANTED! : A TEACHER'S GUIDE TO WRITING & WINNING CLASSROOM GRANTS. Chris Taylor. Chandler, AZ : Five Star Publications, Inc., 2009. 184pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243 .T39 2009
    With GRANTED!, author Chris Taylor, a lawyer, educator and school advocate, shares her 20-plus years of experience with readers to simplify the sometimes intimidating application process for novice grant seekers, while at the same time revealing strategic, insider advice of benefit to even the most veteran grant writers.The invaluable GRANTED! worksheets organize and record grant seekers' thoughts, research, actions and data to give them the best possible chances of securing grants for school projects, supplies and anything else a grant could help fund. GRANTED! not only improves educators' chances of winning a grant, but also saves them valuable time when writing it by navigating them through a more direct route to the finish line.Taylor's grant writing support does not end once GRANTED! has been added to a personal or school library – it continues indefinitely through www.CafeGRANTED.com, a virtual café of a website that offers additional grant data, messages from fellow grant seekers, downloadable worksheets, a sample grant application package, contact info to help grant seekers connect with grant givers and much more. No, you will not be taken for granted with GRANTED!
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing for grants]

    HOW TO GET GRANTS AND GIFTS FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. Stanley Levenson. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2002. 188pp. Main Library Reference Funding Center LC243 .L49 2002
    "Instead of concentrating on bake sales, car washes, pizza sales, gift wrap sales, and other "nickel-and-dime" fundraising efforts, teachers, administrators, school board members, and parents should be seeking more lucrative ways of raising major dollars for schools. These ways are described in this book." Includes suggestions and techniques for pursuing corporate, foundation, and government grants as well as gifts from individual members of your community. Also addresses setting up a Local Education Foundation. Provides advice on how to go about writing government and corporate/foundation grant proposals and includes copies of successful grant applications to review. Finally, it provides a chapter on implementing a fundraising plan for your school or district.
    [Educational fund raising]

    THE PRINCIPAL'S GUIDE TO GRANT SUCCESS. David G. Bauer. New York, N.Y. : Scholastic Inc., 1994. 226pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .B39 1994
    Characterizes different types of grantors with the help of a ready-reference funding source matrix. The matrix makes understanding the differences among funders easy and fast. Includes worksheets and forms that not only tell, but show you what a proposal format contains.
    [Educational fund raising]
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing for grants]

    THE PRINCIPAL'S GUIDE TO WINNING GRANTS. David G. Bauer. San Francisco, Ca. : Jossey-Bass Publishers., 1999. 144pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 B36 1999
    Contents: (1) The Principal's Role in Supporting Grantseeking
    (2) Setting Up a Proactive Grants System in Your School
    (3) Getting Ready: Assessing Needs, Establishing Goals, and Developing Solutions
    (4) The Grants Marketplace: What a Principal Needs to Know
    (5) Finding the Best Funders: Matching Projects to Grantors
    (6) Strategies for Contacting Prospective Grantors
    (7) Putting the Proposal Together: Developing a Strategy, Plan, and Budget
    (8) Preparing Federal Grant Proposals for Your School
    (9) Improving and Submitting Your School's Federal Grant Proposal
    (10) Developing Foundation and Corporate Grants Support for Your School
    (11) Improving and Submitting Your School's Foundation/Corporate Proposal
    (12) The Decision: Contacting Grantors and Dealing with Success/Rejection
    (13) The Principal's Role in Administering Grant Funds
    [Proposal writing in education]
    [Proposal writing for grants]

    SIMPLIFIED GRANTWRITING. Mary Ann Burke. Thousand Oaks : Corwin/Sage, 2002. 123pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC241 .B87 2002
    Teachers and administrators can feel overwhelmed by the grant application process—researching the proper resources, developing the proposals from scratch, and writing well-constructed and effective grants. This step-by-step guidebook will give educators at all levels the practical tools they need to take control of the grantwriting process and succeed, including time-tested ways to:

  • Create a simplified process for managing grantwriting activities
  • Identify an effective marketing strategy
  • Consider various options for collaborating with diverse stakeholders
  • Effectively organize and time-manage the grant development process
  • Understand the integral components of a grant proposal’s needs
  • Design a clearly articulated grant proposal template that addresses all of the funder’s requirements
  • Modify program proposals that meet the diverse funders’ needs
  • Establish a "program sustainability plan" that ensures continuous funding and community support
    Field-tested and refined for more than a decade, these strategies can create a new level of understanding for all practitioners and bring effective grant development to your school and district.
    [Educational fundraising]
    [Proposal writing in Education]

    SUCCESSFUL GRANT WRITING FOR SCHOOL LEADERS : 10 EASY STEPS. Kenneth T. Henson. Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Education, c2012. 250pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 H46 2012
    This book breaks grant-writing down into 10 easy steps so school leaders learn how to sharpen their own skills and help others write highly-competitive grants.
    Hallmark Features:
    •Draws on the authors’ success and experience–which includes over 30 funded grants on a variety of topics from art to physics, ranging from a few thousand to several million dollars.
    •Breaks grant writing down into 10 easy steps–and devotes chapters to the grant-writing process; common grant-writing myths; establishing a grant-writing library; the parts of a grant and how they are developed; constructing an irresistible budget; grant-writing style; good grant sources; the importance of partnerships; and ensuring the grant works and gets refunded.
    •Includes a full chapter on the budget (chapter 6)–and shows how to prepare a budget that will tempt any potential funder and convince them that your proposal is the most practical.
    •Shows how to target good grant sources (chapter 8)–and includes grant-finding tips from successful grant writers so readers learn how to identify and secure funding sources.
    •Provides examples of real grants written by PK-12 educators in a mix of urban, suburban, and rural schools–so readers can examine the actual grants and hear the author explain in their own words how they learned about the grant opportunities, why they wrote their grants, how each grant helped their schools.
    •Offers a list of most frequently used terms and a comprehensive glossary of grant-writing terms (appendix)–that introduce the special language of grant writing.
    •Includes an appendix with a variety of writing-ready tools–such as a glossary of grant terms, several full-blown grants, and grammar exercises to help develop a crisp writing style and avoid the most common grammatical mistakes.
    [Educational fund raising -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Proposal writing for grants -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Proposal writing in education -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]TEACHER'S GUIDE TO WINNING GRANTS. David G. Bauer. San Francisco : Jossey-Bass Publishers, c1999. 150pp. Funding Center (1 East) LC243.A1 B37 1999
    Provides tips on how to determine your chances of success before you invest your valuable time; make pre-proposal contact with funders; identify who will evaluate your proposal and the scoring system they will utilize; organize your proposal and develop a budget; obtain copies of funded proposals; write a cogent, well-prepared proposal; successfully obtain funds by implementing a pro-active grants effort; efficiently implement your proposal.
    [Educational fund raising -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Teaching -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Education -- Research grants -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Proposal writing in education -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]
    [Proposal writing for grants -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.]

     


    Additional Web Pages of Interest

    Catalog of Nonprofit Literature
    http://lnps.fdncenter.org/
    Want to use a database to find articles to read? LNPS Online is a searchable database of the literature of philanthropy. It incorporates the unique contents of the Foundation Center's five libraries and contains more than 24,000 full bibliographic citations, of which more than 16,300 have descriptive abstracts. Drawing on the combined resources of five national libraries, the database is updated daily. Items covered deal with everything from the theory and philosophy of philanthropy, biographies of philanthropists, administration and management of nonprofits, and materials issued by foundations or nonprofit organizations. Sample search: enter "fundraising" as subject and "school" as a keyword. Ask your local library if they carry the journals or books cited. If not ask about Interlibrary Loan.
    (Last checked 07/10/13)

    Grants for Nonprofits: Education lists numerous books and web sites identifying sources of funding for education.

    Grants for Individuals: Education covers financial aid sources related to education.

    If you are interested in more books about fundraising, proposal writing, and related topics, review the following bibliography arranged in alphabetical order by title:

    A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I-L | M-O | P-Q | R-S | T-Z

    If you are interested in video titles on proposal writing and related topics, review Video Titles Only

    Additional web sites on

    are also available.

     

    Google
    WWW http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/
     

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    Funding Center Supervisor
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    E. Lansing, MI 48824
    E-mail: harris23@mail.lib.msu.edu
    Voice mail: (517) 884-0855
    Last revised 07/10/13
     

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