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Nonprofit Fundraising Web Resources (470)


This web site is intended as a starting point for those who are interested in learning more about foundations, fundraising, proposal writing, philanthropy and philanthropists, corporate philanthropy, international philanthropy, government funding, nonprofit organizations, nonprofit organization administration, planned giving, prospect research, and voluntarism, but only want to look at resources available on the web. 

If you are only interested in academic fundraising, take a look at http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/4acfrais.htm.

If you are only interested in fundraising for educators, take a look at http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/4acfrais.htm.

If you are only interested in religious fundraising, take a look at http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/4relfund.htm.

If you don't mind looking at books, videos, etc., you may want to take a look at http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/4fc_a.htm as well.

 

3 KEYS TO WRITING GOOD NARRATIVES (GRANT WRITING TIPS)
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/threekey.htm
An electronic reprint from Aid for Education, a CD Publication newsletter.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

5 BEST QUICK FUNDRAISING METHODS
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/strategy-and-planning/quick-fundraising-methods/
Quick fundraising usually isn’t good fundraising. Most of the time, non-profits are well advised to spend time getting to know their prospects and donors, cultivating them, and executing a well-written fundraising plan to raise the money they need to operate. Of course, there are times when every organization, no matter how well run, comes into financial difficulty, whether it be caused by a downturn in the economy, a major donor leaving the fold, or a need to rapidly expand your programs or physical plant. When that time comes, your church, school, or charity will need to come up with a fundraising strategy – and fast. Here are the 5 best quick fundraising methods you can use to help you get back on track. Article by Joe Gerecht, The Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT INDIVIDUAL FUNDRAISING
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/individual-fundraising/individual-giving-tips/
Individual fundraising (raising money from individuals) should form the backbone of 90% of all development organizations that exist today. All types of fundraising are important to carrying out your mission, and none can be discounted, but non-profits that can successfully rely on events, direct mail, or grants are the exception, not the rule, and generally are national, not local in scale. For most small and mid-sized non-profits, individual fundraising will provide a major portion of your fundraising revenues. Advice from the Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

5 UNIQUE FUNDRAISING IDEAS
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/fundraising-ideas/unique-fundraising-ideas/
Sometimes, fundraising is boring. Monotonous. A drudgery. That’s bad for professional fundraisers (who wants to be bored at work?), it’s bad for volunteers (they’ll move on to another, more exciting challenge), and worst of all, it’s bad for donors. And that’s why coming up with unique fundraising ideas matters. Donors get tired of the same old fundraising ideas. Annual appeal letters… big fundraising events… breakfast networking events… after a few years with an organization, donors get bored, and they move on. Don’t let that happen to your school, church, or charity. It’s far easier to keep a current donor than to find a new donor to replace one that moves on. Use these 5 unique fundraising ideas to spice up your non-profit’s development efforts. Article by Joe Gerecht, The Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

7 BIGGEST SPECIAL EVENT PLANNING MISTAKES AND HOW TO AVOID THEM
http://www.get-articles.com/pdfs/4067.pdf
Have you ever heard the expression: "You can never be too rich or too thin"? In the case of special events planning, you can never be too organized. Events are critical in providing outreach and exposure for an organization, and some can often be an excellent fund-raising and friend-raising tool. It's easy to make a mistake when there are so many details and those mistakes could cost your reputation and customers if you're not on top of every detail. Here are the most common mistakes made and the solutions to help avoid such problems. Article by Shannon Cherry, Nonprofit Leader, March 2003.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

7 TIPS FOR WRITING SUCCESSFUL PROPOSALS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130927190728/http://www.washingtongrantmakers.org/s_wash/sec.asp?CID=5094&DID=11163
Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

9 KEY ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL PROPOSALS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/nine.htm
Practical advice from the former Grantseeker.Com Learning Center Home Page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 ESSENTIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF FOUNDATION BOARD CHAIRS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130927200113/http://www.michiganfoundations.org/s_cmf/bin.asp?CID=2528&DID=17880&DOC=FILE.PDF
Few roles are more significant in ensuring a foundation’s success than that of the board chair. But many board chairs find the role daunting and lack understanding of what is expected of them. This 22-page resource will help new and seasoned board chairs understand their 10 essential responsibilities and gain practical tips for carrying them out. The responsibilities are adaptable to all foundation types: family, community, private/independent or unstaffed. It was published by BoardSource, the national voice of nonprofit governance, with support from the Council of Michigan Foundations. Still available thanks to the Internet Archives.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 MOST COMMON REASONS GRANTS ARE DECLINED
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/ten.htm
Practical advice from Grants Guides Plus, a publisher of state foundation directories. Also listed as Ten ....
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 SIMPLE STEPS TO GETTING YOUR FUNDRAISING ONLINE : A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ONLINE FUNDRAISING
https://m1.auctionpay.com/mk/get/10simplesteps
This paper is a step-by-step guide on how to fundraise online. Whether you handle it in-house or comparison shop for a service provider, this guide will help you ask the right questions and assess the best course of action for your organization. The guide covers everything from understanding the benefits of an online strategy to how to securely process donations and integrate online and offline fundraising activities. Requires free registration. Courtesy of AuctionPay.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 SIMPLE WAYS NONPROFITS CAN WIN AT SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
http://www.twistimage.com/blog/archives/10-simple-ways-non-profits-can-win-at-social-media-marketing/
Social Media Marketing is a tool that is already working for big brands. Imagine what it can do for those who are doing everything they can to make the world a better place?
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 WAYS FOR NONPROFITS TO CUT COSTS
http://nonprofit.about.com/od/nonprofitmanagement/tp/cuttingcosts.htm
Saving Money Is as Important as Increasing Revenue. Article by Joanne Fritz in About.com Guide.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 WAYS NONPROFITS CAN USE BLOGS AND BLOGGERS TO SUPPORT THEIR CAUSE
http://www.casefoundation.org/spotlight/10-ways-nonprofits-can-use-blogs-and-bloggers-support-their-cause
Blogs fall under the category of "social media" because they are, well, social. They are a tool that allows for a conversation between the reader and the writer, and for information to reach people quickly all over the world. So if your nonprofit is going to include a blog in its communications strategy, that should include other bloggers too. Advice from the Case Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

10 WAYS TO RAISE MONEY IN A RECESSION
http://www.txnp.org/Article/?ArticleID=9360
Advice from Nell Edgington appearing in Texas Nonprofits, November 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

11 NONPROFIT WEBSITES DESIGNED FOR THE SOCIAL WEB
http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2011/07/18/11-nonprofit-websites-designed-for-the-social-web/
The average Internet user today is barraged with a constant stream of messages in the form of tweets, status updates, shouts, bulletins, e-mail, and “Breaking News!” Social media is not only changing how we communicate online, but it’s also changing how our brains process information. That said, nonprofits would be wise to consider the effect of the Social Web when launching or re-designing their websites. The website design principles of just five years ago no longer apply. Today, a well-designed website should have less text, more images and videos, extremely simple navigation, and obvious placement of “Donate Now” buttons, e-newsletter “Subscribe” functionality, and social networking icons. In essence, your website design needs to go out of its way to not overwhelm your visitors while at the same time help them focus their attention instantaneously on your nonprofit’s key messages and calls to action. Here are 11 excellent examples from the nonprofit sector.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

11 TIPS FOR YOUR NONPROFIT BLOG
https://web.archive.org/web/20081003153408/http://www.imakenews.com/ephilanthropy/e_article001151173.cfm?x=b11,0,w
Advice riginally posted by See3 Communications. Shared by ePhilanthropy eZine, Vol. 8, Issue 26, August 19, 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

12 STEPS TO WRITING A GRANT
Part 1 : https://web.archive.org/web/20101124114731/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=208
Part 2 : https://web.archive.org/web/20101124114818/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=213
Part 3 : https://web.archive.org/web/20101124115432/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=216
Part 4 : https://web.archive.org/web/20101124122257/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=238
Part 5 : https://web.archive.org/web/20101124111135/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=243
Part 6 : http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=247
Conclusion: https://web.archive.org/web/20101124132318/http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=251
Advice from Louis S. Schafer, Ed.S. of the Grantmaker's Cafe and SchoolHousePartners.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

13 TIPS FOR RAISING MONEY ONLINE
http://www.fundraising123.org/article/13-tips-raising-money-online
When you're trying to raise money online from your members, web site visitors, or other constituents, keep these 13 tips in mind. Advice from Nick Allen, Network for Good, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE 20 BIGGEST FUNDRAISING MISTAKES
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/biggest.htm
Meet major fundraising mistakes 1-10. Call them what you will—gaffes, blunders, oversights, or errors—mistakes creep into everyone's professional life. But in fundraising—unlike other fields—where thousands if not millions of dollars are often at stake, mistakes can be especially hazardous. Who hasn't forfeited a significant gift, or received but a token one, due to some serious miscalculation? While there may be hundreds of them, 20 potentially costly fundraising mistakes stand out. Source : GuideStar.org Newsletter, October 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

20 EMERGENCY FUNDING SOURCES FOR NONPROFITS
http://www.fieldstonealliance.org/client/tools_you_can_use/12-16-08_emergency_funding.cfm
Consultants Tom Triplett and Alexis Cress developed the following list of 20 emergency funding ideas. These are revenue sources that can be accessed quickly—usually within 30 days. Not all of these sources are available to all nonprofits, and some of them carry great risk. Nonetheless, we hope you find the list useful and thought-provoking. We urge you to combine ideas for a comprehensive response. Funding sources like to know that they're not the only avenue you're pursuing. For example, you may want to put together a quick-hit fundraising initiative with a re-pricing of your services. Advice from the Fieldstone Alliance, December 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

20 GRANTWRITING TIPS
http://www.arcusfoundation.org/socialjustice/newsroom/arcus_publications/20_grantwriting_tips/
Advice from Cindy T. Rizzo, Director of Grant Making Programs, The Arcus Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

20 TIPS EVERY STRATEGIC GRANT SEEKER SHOULD KNOW
https://4good.org/jonathan-peizer--13/20-tips-every-strategic-grantseeker-should-know
This manual is written for every grant seeker wanting to do a better job of translating their passion into successful grants or who have walked away from donor interactions wondering what they were thinking. It explores the key issues from a grant maker's perspective, providing grant seekers insight into the dynamics of the donor decision making process and the reasoning behind it. Most importantly, it lays out strategies to leverage these dynamics. The twenty-four page guide is written in very practical terms. Each page describes a distinct donor behavior or practice, a brief description of why it occurs, its effect, and most importantly a strategy for the grant seeker to leverage or avoid it. I think it's a very useful and timely guide for difficult economic times and is based on my experience on both sides of the table and in the sector over a couple of decades. Expect at least a few "A-Ha" moments as you read the tips and accumulate insight into donor behavior. Courtesy of Jonathan Peizer.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

25 IDEAS FOR PUBLICIZING CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/25ideas.htm
Practical tips on nonprofit marketing from the Gill Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

26 WAYS TO GET YOUR BOARD TO RAISE MONEY
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/26ways.htm
In order for your grassroots river group to survive, it is essential that your board fulfill its responsibility to "give and get" for your organization. This means first and foremost that every board member must make a financial contribution appropriate to his or her means and ability. It is critical do this, since in order to solicit others effectively, board members must have also made a gift of their own. Moreover, foundations often look closely at board giving as a measure of a board's commitment and effectiveness. In addition to giving, all board members should help with the "getting" in some way. Fundraising cannot be delegated to one board member or even a board committee. Every board member can and should help (and will feel good about contributing to the financial well-being of an organization they are committed to). Article by Pat Munoz posted by the River Network, June 5, 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

55 WAYS FOR BOARD MEMBERS TO RAISE $500
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/55ways.htm
The board of directors plays a crucial role in the selection, implementation, and evaluation of fundraising strategies. In addition to other ways that board members may participate in fundraising, they individually commit to raising and giving a certain amount of money, or commit to working by themselves on specific strategies with no financial gain attached. Reprinted fromt he Board of Directors by Stephanie Roth and Kim Klein, a publication of the Grassroots Fundrising Journal, Chardon Press, 1999.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

79 GRANT RESOURCES YOU CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT
http://grant-writing-resources.blogspot.com/
An interesting blog by a grant writer. Still has a ways to go to list 79 resources however.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

501(c)(3) - TO BE OR NOT TO BE
https://web.archive.org/web/20131012091945/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/501%20c%203-%20To%20Be%20Or%20Not%20To%20Be.pdf
For most fledgling organizations, the process of forming a nonprofit corporation is fraught with confusion. To help demystify these complicated procedures, attorney Anthony Mancuso has written a series of step-by-step guides that lay out the basic principles of nonprofit incorportion. Courtesy of the Grantsmanship Center Magazine, Summer 96, Issue 30. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE 2008 ONLINE FUNDRAISING SURVIVAL GUIDE : 12 WINNING STRATEGIES TO SURVIVE & THRIVE IN A DOWN ECONOMY
http://www.fundraising123.org/files/SurvivalGuideEbook_0.pdf
Network for Good.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ABC'S OF FUNDRAISING
http://relay.acsevents.org/site/DocServer/ABC's%20of%20Fundraising.pdf?docID=57222
https://www.societylink.org/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_0_1623240_0_0_18/RFL%20ABCs%20of%20Fundraise%20Sheet.pdf
The American Cancer Society Relay for Life provides an A-Z list of fundraising ideas.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ABOUT.COM'S GUIDE TO NONPROFIT CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS
http://nonprofit.about.com/?once=true&
A collection of news items of interest to nonprofit charitable Organizations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ACCESSING FUNDING IN YOUR COMMUNITY
https://web.archive.org/web/20130521080622/http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/rcpi/accessresource.pdf
Tip Sheet #1, December 2000. Courtesy of the Neighborhood Associations of Michigan.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ACQUIRING RESOURCES : FUNDRAISING
http://happeninhabitats.pwnet.org/pdf/Fundraising.pdf
Advice from the National Wildlife Federation on finding possible sources of money for schoolyard habitats and gardens. Includes a sample proposal letter.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

AHERN COMMUNICATIONS, INK.
http://www.aherncomm.com
Free how-to newsletter by one of North America's recognized authorities on effective nonprofit communications, Tom Ahern. Samples of fundraising materials (case statements, solicitation letters) he has written for organizations like yours. Check out Tom's Love Thy Reader workshop handout in the PDF Archive under Miscellaneous.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ALL ABOUT USING CONSULTANTS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130810091934/http://managementhelp.org/misc/cnsltng.htm
Practical advice from Carter McNamara, The Management Assistance Program for Nonprofits, St. Paul, Minnesota. Sections include: Situations When a Consultant is Useful; Where to Get Consultants; Making Consultants as Productive as Possible; getting and Hiring the Consultant; and Additional Advice. Still available thanks to the Internet Archives.
Also listed under Fundraisers/Consultants.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ALL FUNDRAISING COMPANIES DIRECTORY
http://www.fundraisingweb.org/
1200+ fundraising companies. Choose from the most fundraising ideas and fundraising products on the Internet.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

AMERICA'S CAR DONATION CHARITIES CENTER
http://www.donateacar.com/
On this site, you choose the charity that you want to benefit from the donation of your car, boat or RV and you may receive the full fair market value as a tax deduction. As a charitable contribution your car donation could make a big difference.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

AND THE BRAND PLAYS ON
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/129/fundraising.html
In our post-September 11th world, government deficits at the national, state and local levels are exploding, resulting in a decline in government funding for housing and other human services. A less than robust stock market has forced philanthropic foundations to cut back on both the number and dollar amounts of their grants. Even United Way agencies in many communities are facing difficulties of their own and are unable to raise the necessary funds to support local nonprofits at the levels they have in the past. In short, competition for dwindling resources is becoming more ferocious than ever. It’s not enough to simply be good at what you do – you have to differentiate your organization from similar organizations. Which leads us to why your CDC brand needs to be visible, understood and respected by those you seek as clients, supporters and funders. People align themselves with and support organizations they know, trust and feel good about. Article by Larry Checco, Shelterforce Online, Issue 129, May/June 2003.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ANNIVERSARY FUNDRAISING
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/110/fundraising.html
The Center for Anti-Violence Education in Brooklyn, New York hired part-time consultants and recruited additional volunteers to help raise money during their 20th anniversary year. Article by Lucy Grugett and Stephanie Roth, Shelterforce Online, March/April 2000.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

APPLYING FOR A GRANT
Internet Archive Link
Thousands of private and public programs disburse billions of grant dollars every year. Here are some pointers on how to best present your organization's case to receive some of this revenue. Source: Union Bank of California Non-for-Profit Banking Center. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

APPROACHING CORPORATIONS FOR FUNDING
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/107/fundraising.html
Many people have remarked on the paucity of corporate giving, particularly in an era when many corporations are seeing record-breaking profits. But the simple fact to understand is that it is remarkable corporations give away any money at all. The role of corporations in America is to make money, to maximize return to shareholders, or to show a profit. Many economists believe corporations serve society best when they are profitable: they hire more workers and invest in more expansion. Others believe that corporations are members of the community and society, and like individuals, service clubs, religious institutions, and foundations, corporations ought to return some of their profit to their communities in the form of charitable giving. About 11 percent of corporations agree with us and give away some portion of their pre-tax profits. Corporations can give up to 10 percent of pre-tax profits. Only a handful give at that level, notably Ben and Jerry's, Patagonia, and the Body Shop. Most give around 1 percent of pre-tax profits. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, #107, Sept./Oct. 1999.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

APPROACHING THE FOUNDATION
http://www.wkkf.org/resource-directory/resource/2003/09/approaching-the-foundation
The following document by Robert F. Long, Ph.D., and Joel J. Orosz, Ph.D. offers a strategy for approaching foundations and a basic framework for the first written presentation of a funding request. An earlier version of this paper was published in Philanthropy, Australian Association of Philanthropy, Inc., Sydney, Australia, 1995.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ASK PEOPLE FOR MONEY FACE-TO-FACE : PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK
http://www.virtualcap.com/downloads/VC/US_Fundraising_Gill_Fdn_Ask.pdf
Practical advice from the Gill Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BASIC FOUNDATION GRANTSEEKING
http://www.rivernetwork.org/resource-library/foundation-grantseeking
Pat Munoz of the River Network gave this presentation at River Rally 2009 in Baltimore, MD. It covers how to identify appropriate foundation prospects, reviews strategies for cultivating foundation prospects, provides a basic fundraising proposal template, and other resources on foundation grantseeking. (Last checked 07/31/14)

BASIC GRANT WRITING (POWERPOINT PRESENTATION)
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/basic-grant-writing/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-10-06
Basic Grant Writing includes tips and sources for researching grants and steps to write a proposal once a grant has been identified, as well as steps to follow once the grant has been received or denied. Courtesy of the Merrimack Valley Food Bank, INc.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BASIC GUIDE TO OUTCOMES-BASED EVALUATION FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS WITH VERY LIMITED RESOURCES
http://www.managementhelp.org/evaluatn/outcomes.htm
This document provides guidance toward basic planning and implementation of an outcomes-based evaluation process (also called outcomes evaluation) in nonprofit organizations. This document provides basic guidance -- particularly to small nonprofits with very limited resources. Courtesy of the Free Management Library.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A BASIC GUIDE TO PROGRAM EVALUATION
https://web.archive.org/web/20131024002155/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/A%20Basic%20Guide%20to%20Program%20Evaluation.pdf
More and more grantmakers are demanding program evaluations as a condition of funding. Management consultant Carter McNamara lays out a framework for conducting these evaluations, and he charts the various methods available for gathering valuable data. Carter McNamara, Grantsmanship Magazine. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BASICS OF GRANT WRITING
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKsOHjH2ZBk&feature=related
Ken Freeman of the Monday Minute provides quick advice for community crisis centers on how to go about researching and writing a grant proposal.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BASICS OF GRANT WRITING
http://www.slideshare.net/preciseedit/basics-of-grant-writingpublic
David Bowman provides Precise Edit's 1 day grant writing class via Shareware.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO FUNDRAISING
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/fundraising-basics/
Fundraising can sometimes seem confusing, even scary… but it needn’t be. You see… great fundraisers aren’t born. They are made. Anyone can become a great fundraiser by learning the principles behind raising money, then practicing over and over again. While some people are naturally gifted fundraisers, for the most part, everyone in the fundraising world started off feeling confused and awkward. Advice from the Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BEST GRANT TIPS OF 1997
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/besttips.htm
Advice from Mental Health News Alert by CD Publications and originally posted on the CD Publications web page as a sample of the type of funding information regularly available in that newsletter.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BEST OF ERC NEWSBRIEFS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/ercbest.htm
ERC Newsbriefs was a monthly newsletter published by Ecumenical Resource Consultants, Inc. providing funding and current awareness information for church-related social ministry agencies, educational institutions, and community-based organizations. At the very end of each issue, Ronald J. Meshanko, President, usually shared advice or tips. This web site pulls together some of these advice columns.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BEYOND CASH GUIDE FOR NONPROFIT BOARDS
http://www.taprootfoundation.org/docs/BEYOND-CASH-Guide-for-Nonprofit-Boards.pdf
A guide on how nonprofit boards can tap pro bono and in-kind resources, co-written by Taproot Foundation and BoardSource.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BEYOND THE BAKE SALE
http://www.cdsfunds.com/beyond_the_bake_sale.html
How to use estate planning and wealth retreats to create a permanent funding source for your non-profit organization. Article by Don Smith, JD.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BIG IDEAS, see GRANT WRITING: A BEST PRACTICE GUIDE

THE BOARD AND FUNDRAISING
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/99/fundrais.html
The reluctance of board members to take responsibility for fundraising can usually be traced to two sources: 1) board members don't understand the importance of taking a leadership role in fundraising, and 2) they are afraid of asking for money. Board members cannot give themselves wholeheartedly to the process of fundraising unless these two problems are resolved. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 99, May/June 1998.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BOARD MEMBER FUNDRAISING EXPECTATIONS CHECKLIST
https://4good.org/k-weill-consulting/board-member-fundraising-expectations-checklist
Create a checklist and have each Board member sign off on it at the start of your fiscal year!
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE BODY, HEART, AND SOUL OF GRANTWRITING
Internet Archive Link
An article written by Judith Prebyl and appearing in the Spring/Summer 1995 issue of the Folio, the newsletter of the Friends of California Libraries. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BROADCAST YOUR CAUSE : YOUTUBE NONPROFIT PROGRAM
http://www.youtube.com/nonprofits
Does your organization have a compelling story to tell? Do you want to connect with your supporters, volunteers, and donors but don't have the funds to launch expensive outreach campaigns? YouTube can help. Video is a powerful way to show your organization's impact and needs, and with a designated "Nonprofit" channel on YouTube, you can deliver your message to the world's largest online video community. ePhilanthropy eZine, Vol. 8, Issue 27, September 2, 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BUILDING A DONOR DATA BASE WITH PERSONAL LETTERS
Internet Archive Link
We all know from the how-to books, the articles printed in terrific journals like this, and the talks and roundtables for which development officers and other nonprofit managers gather, that the most effective way for a charitable organization to raise money from individuals is to ask them personally for gifts. An article by Dan De Vries reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 18, Number 4, © Chardon Press, 1999. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

BUILDING GRANT PROPOSALS AND COALITIONS : FINDING RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINING EMERGENCY SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
Courtesy of VFIS, a division of the Glatfelter Insurance Group.
Last checked 07/31/14)

THE BUSINESS OF GETTING A GRANT
http://unitedanimalrescuers.com/getting_a_grant.htm
Foundations like to fund good people who have prepared good plans for pursuing good ideas. The business of getting a grant has many steps, but they all rely on the following axiom: know how to prepare yourself before asking for a grant, and know what the foundation staff member(s) receiving your request will be looking for. Here are some steps to take in preparing and presenting your grant proposals. Advice from the Boulder Valley Humane Society posted by the United Animal Rescuers's web page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAMPAIGN ASSESSMENT AND REVIEW : WHAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED AND WHAT WAS LEARNED
http://www.raise-funds.com/1999/campaign-assessment-and-review-what-was-accomplished-and-what-was-learned/
It’s over. The campaign is finished. The thank-you’s have been said and the money counted. However, before closing the book on a campaign for good, you should take one last look at it. The days immediately following a campaign are the time to analyze what went wrong and what went right, which fixes worked and which didn’t. Chapter 15 of It's a Great Day to Fund-Raise! by Tony Poderis.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAPACITERIA
http://www.capaciteria.org
Capaciteria is a comprehensive, searchable database directory of administrative resources that help nonprofits leverage their own capacity. It promotes peer review because members can comment on and rate individual resource links as well as add useful new links. Like Google, search requests return link results weighted to rise based on ratings and popularity given to them by nonprofit users. Capaciteria resources are accessible by clicking on the Directory link. Free registration required.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAPACITY BUILDING FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS : A RESOURCE LIST
hhttp://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/topical/capacity.html
Increasingly, foundations are providing grants to help nonprofit organizations carry out their missions more effectively. A wealth of literature has emerged as experts examine the impact of capacity building programs. This resource list contains citations to selected works from the Foundation Center's bibliographic database, Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, for grantmakers and nonprofits interested in learning more about capacity building.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN FEASABILITY STUDY : ALWAYS A GOOD IDEA
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/feasibility.htm
Is your nonprofit considering a capital campaign in the next two to three years? That is, will you be purchasing a building, renovating a building, acquiring land or purchasing large pieces of equipment? If so, you must do a feasibility study before you decide to launch the campaign. Tips from the Zimmerman-Lehman Consulting Firm of San Francisco.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS : TEN STEPS TO SUCCESS
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/capital.htm
This article reviews the role of your board members and other volunteers in the campaign, highlights the feasibility study and comprehensive donor research, examines the purpose and preparation of effective case statements, and gives the specifics of campaign management. Tips from Zimmerman-Lehman, a consulting firm in San Francisco, 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CAPITAL FUNDING FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
https://web.archive.org/web/20120116161949/http://www.raconline.org/topics/funding/capitalfaq.php
Tips from the Rural Assistance Center. Still available thanks to the Internet Archives.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CATALOG OF NONPROFIT LITERATURE
http://catalog.foundationcenter.org/
The Foundation Center has now converted the contents of the first eight volumes of The Literature of the Nonprofit Sector into a searchable database covering over 24,900 full bibliographic citations, most of which have descriptive abstracts. Drawing on the combined resources of five national libraries, the database is updated regularly. Items covered deal with everything from the theory and philosophy of philanthropy, biographies of philanthropists, administration and management of nonprofits, and materials issued by foundations or nonprofit organizations.
Note: Also listed under Nonprofits.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CHANGING OUR WORLD THROUGH PHILANTHROPY
http://www.changingourworld.com
Founded by two fund-raising consulting companies, Mike Hoffman Associates and CTE Associates, both in New York, this Web site provides articles about fund raising and links to articles about philanthropy that have been published by other news organizations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CHARITABLE GIVING BY THE GENERATIONS
http://nonprofit.about.com/od/fundraising/a/generationalgivingstudy.htm
What Fundraisers Should Know About Donor Generations. Article by By Joanne Fritz from About.com Guide
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CHARITY CHANNEL
http://CharityChannel.com
Billing itself as the oldest and largest online community of nonprofit professionals, the CharityChannel has forums dedicated to such topics as college and university advancement, health-care philanthropy, arts and social organization fund raising, international fund raising, mentoring and more. As of March 2008, a subscription is required to gain access.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CHOOSING THE RIGHT EVENT
Internet Archive Link
Many groups spend inordinate amounts of time and money producing special events, only to discover that the benefits fall far short of the effort. The first step in planning a successful event is deciding whether it's right for the organization. Fundraising experts Betty Stallings and Donna McMillion outline the criteria to use in selecting events wisely. Courtesy of the Grantsmanship Center News. Note: Use Mozilla Firefox to retrieve article.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CHOOSING THE RIGHT FUNDRAISING STRATEGY
Internet Archive Link
An article by Kim Klein and Stephanie Roth reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 18, Number 3, © Chardon Press, 1999. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COLLABORATIVE FUNDRAISING
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/105/fundraising.html
Joining forces with other groups to engage in fundraising is a task most people resent. The goal of course is to earn money, a substance that everyone admits they need but almost no one relates to in a healthy way. Can it be done? The answer is yes, under certain circumstances and with a little luck. Describes various examples of nonprofits working together to achieve funding to acquire joint resurces. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 105, May/June 1999.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMON GRANT APPLICATION FORM
https://www.michiganfoundations.org/resources/common-grant-application-form
Courtesy of the Council of Michigan Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMON QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT FUNDRAISING FOR SMALL NONPROFITS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/znpq&a.htm
Questions include:
(1) What do I do if the funder says "we only give to pre-selected organizations"?
(2) None of the local funders is willing to come up with money to expand our program. As a small nonprofit, do we have any chance of funding from large, national foundations?
(3) I've got an interview with a program officer and I want to make an impact. How can I take control of the short time I'm allowed for the meeting?
(4) How can I get an interview with the program officer when the foundation "prefers to be contacted by mail"?
(5) How can I cover my general operating costs, when the foundation does not cover "administrative expenses"?
These questions originally came from Grant Guides Plus and the Grantseeker.Com web page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMON QUESTIONS ASKED BY GRANT REVIEWERS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/commonq.htm
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY FOUNDATION GRANTS SAMPLER : MAKING AN IMPACT
Internet Archive Link
A list of sample grants made by Michigan community foundations. Note: Use Mozilla Firefox to retrieve article.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY TOOL BOX, CHAPTER 42, SECTION 1 : DEVELOPING A PLAN FOR FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/finances/grants-and-financial-resources/financial-sustainability/main
A look at the basics of planning for the financial sustainability of your organization. We'll discuss what it means, why do it, and how to do it. Finally, we'll close the section with some tips from the field from folks who have been doing this work for a long time.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY TOOL BOX, CHAPTER 42, SECTION 2 : CREATING A BUSINESS PLAN
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/finances/grants-and-financial-resources/business-plan/main
To plan for your overall financial sustainability requires an overall financial plan, and if business operations are part of what sustains you, then you will also need a business plan.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY TOOL BOX, CHAPTER 42, SECTION 3 : DEVELOPING A COMMITTEE TO HELP WITH FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/finances/grants-and-financial-resources/financial-sustainability-committee/main
Most of us, in our personal lives, have experienced the headache of trying to pay our bills when the checkbook is dry, or making that small paycheck go a long way. We wonder how we will pay for Kim's braces and a new transmission; and we try to decide if we should cash in a CD or just eat spaghetti all month. Financial difficulties, unfortunately, are often part of our organizational lives as well. If your group is like many community organizations, finding the money to reach your goals is a constant struggle. Do we cut staff or programs? What will we do when the grant ends? Where else can we get support? Fortunately, at work, at least, you don't have to be alone dealing with your financial woes. Others are there who can take care of the money, so that other members of the organization can breathe easier and focus on the work they were hired to do, such as increase immunizations, fight the death penalty, or clean the environment. The people who can help manage your finances may be on the Board of Directors, hired grant writers, or - our suggestion - members of your financial sustainability committee.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY TOOL BOX, CHAPTER 42, SECTION 4 : APPLYING FOR A GRANT: THE GENERAL APPROACH
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/finances/grants-and-financial-resources/grant-application/main
Grants are wonderful, most of us think -- and much of the time they really are. People give you money to do just what you want to do, maybe what you've always longed to do. How many times does that happen in life? But most of the time, grants aren't easy to get. First, you have to find the right grant source. Secondly, you have to write the grant proposal. Both take time and energy, often intense labor; and your labors are not always rewarded, because grants are competitive. This isn't surprising; many others want grants for the same reasons you do. Now, the good news: grant-writing is learnable. You can learn how to do it, and to do it well. Two main sets of skills are involved. One is writing the grant itself – and there are many excellent resources that will lead you through the process, step-by-step, with plenty of details, some of which are included in the Resources for this section. The other skill area involves activities that accompany the actual grant-writing. Many of these deal with preparation. Some others parallel the writing itself. All of them fall under the heading of "general approach"; and while this heading is loose, its contents are vital.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

COMMUNITY TOOL BOX, CHAPTER 42, SECTION 5 : WRITING A GRANT
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/finances/grants-and-financial-resources/writing-a-grant/main
Has your community identified a health problem and a strategy for addressing it, but reached a roadblock to action because of inadequate funding? A grant can provide that much-needed funding and enhance the community's capacity for change. Whether you have never contemplated writing a grant proposal and feel intimidated about how to begin, or you have written grant proposals in the past but feel a bit rusty and want to enhance your capacity, this is the tool for you! This discussion primarily covers how to apply for grants available through the public sector, but many of the strategies can be applied to foundation grant proposals as well.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CONSULTING FEES FOR GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING
https://web.archive.org/web/20131013034454/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/Consulting%20Fees%20for%20Grant%20Proposal%20Writing.pdf
How much to charge for grant preparation and research is a question that vexes both consultants and the organizations they work for. Members of TGCI-Forum, The Grantsmanship Center's online discussion group, offer their ideas and insights. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
Also listed under Fundraisers/Consultants.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CONSULTING OR CONTRACTING: KNOWING WHAT YOU NEED
Internet Archive Link
In the nonprofit world, agencies may find themselves working with both consultants and contractors not recognizing the difference. Each fulfills an important function and both can bring immense value. At times, a person may function as both. I know I did. If your organization is considering bringing in an external resource, it is important to know what you want in advance to ensure the person you hire is capable of completing the work you need. Grants and Foundations Review, February 25, 2003. Note: Use Mozilla Firefox to retrieve article.
Also listed under Fundraisers/Consultants.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS : A GUIDE FOR THE NONPROFIT SECTOR
Internet Archive Link
There are many ways in which nonprofits can partner with business corporations, and there are many complexities and nuances to these various arrangements. This guide will not provide all the answers, nor does it substitute for the intensive consultation or staff work that a nonprofit may need to completely assess, negotiate, design, implement, monitor or evaluate, a particular corporate venture. Rather this guide is intended to familiarize nonprofit managers with the general character of corporate partnerships and it offers a way to identify and preliminarily assess the implications of proposed ventures. In short, the guide provides a conceptual frame of reference through which nonprofit leaders can put such a venture into perspective and determine whether it is a good idea for their organization to pursue. Advice from Dennis R. Young, National Center on Nonprofit Enterprise. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CRACKING THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
Internet Archive Link
We've all read about the community foundation boom in recent years--giving by community foundations has more than doubled since 1995--but how can you maximize this new stream of potential income for your organization? The character of community foundations differs dramatically from one to the next. They range from progressive to conservative, from straightforward to enigmatic. Their similarities lie in their commitment to the communities in which they serve, be they a city, county, region, or state. Advice from Susan Schaefer, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, March 26, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CREATING A BUDGET FOR FUNDRAISING
Internet Archive Link
Octavia Morgan offers guidelines for estimating what it will cost to reach your fundraising goals, including two detailed charts that will help you estimate costs for fundraising activities and for building your infrastructure. Source: Nonprofit Leader, June 2003 issue. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CREATING A BUDGET WITH THE BUDGET-CHALLENGED
Internet Archive Link
When you are charged with preparing a grant proposal with a project director who is a grant-writing novice, one of the most challenging tasks you will have is developing an adequate budget. Those who are not used to thinking in monetary terms could be (at best) sketchy on details or (at worst) anxious and avoidant of the whole thing. The following tips can help you ease their discomfort AND prepare a budget that is sufficient to carry out the project. Article by Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, Feb 5, 2003. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CREATING A COMMUNITY PROFILE : SOCIAL, DEMOGRAPHIC, AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS
http://www.epa.gov/greenkit/traits.htm
The information sources listed below are tools that are designed to assist communities gather pertinent information to answer the question "Where Are We Now?" and to develop a Community Profile. Each of these sources contains a description of the resource, what information is available and where to locate that information, case studies, and any available mapping. Courtesy of the Environmental Protection Agency.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE CULLER OF MONEY
http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/cover/2005/cover0617.html
Late-night infomercial clown Matthew Lesko has authored nearly 100 books on government grants. His formula? “I don’t write,” he says. “I plagiarize.”
(Last checked 07/31/14)

CULTIVATION: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT IS NOT
Internet Archive Link
An article by Kim Klein reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 18, Number 5, © Chardon Press, 1999. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DATELINE NBC ON GRANT FUNDING SCAM ARTISTS
Internet Archive Link
Beware of offers to identify funders for a fee. Note: Use Mozilla Firefox to retrieve web pages.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPING A FOUNDATION FUNDRAISING STRATEGY
http://www.ncsc.info/newsletter/conference/fundraising.htm
Practical advice from Kelly Hurt, President of Kelly Hurt & Associates, Inc., a grantwriting and fundraising consulting agency. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPING A PLAN FOR FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/sub_section_main_1297.aspx
Sometimes, it seems like community work has a high price tag, and no one wants to foot the bill. There is so much change we want to see happen, but our finances are in such a sorry state that we're just trying to maintain what we've done so far. Staff is underpaid, overworked, and burning out; necessary programs are dropped or scaled back because there's no money; and closing the organization's doors is a constant fear in the back of everyone's mind. This goes on for years for many nonprofit groups; for others, the doors really do slam shut. Sound familiar? Our question in this section is, how can this be avoided? Or, if this is the reality your group is faced with, how can it be changed? Article by Jenette Nagy Edited by Tom Wolff and Phil Rabinowitz from the Community Toolbox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPING AND WRITING GRANT PROPOSALS
https://cfda.symplicity.com/downloads/CFDA_writing.pdf
A successful grant proposal is one that is well-prepared, thoughtfully planned, and concisely packaged. The potential applicant should become familiar with all of the pertinent program criteria related to the Catalog program from which assistance is sought. Refer to the information contact person listed in the Catalog program description before developing a proposal to obtain information such as whether funding is available, when applicable deadlines occur, and the process used by the grantor agency for accepting applications. Applicants should remember that the basic requirements, application forms, information and procedures vary with the Federal agency making the grant award.
Individuals without prior grant proposal writing experience may find it useful to attend a grantsmanship workshop. A workshop can amplify the basic information presented here. Applicants interested in additional readings on grantsmanship and proposal development should consult the references listed at the end of this section and explore other library resources. Advice from the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPING QUALITY GRANT PROPOSALS
http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/government/fbci/grant-proposals.html
http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/presentations/proposals/index.html
Washington, D.C. : White House Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, [2003?]. 62pp.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPING THE BEST GRANT PROPOSALS FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION
Internet Archive Link
Reviews major issues that you should consider when developing and writing a proposal for funding from foundations, corporations, or governments. Topics include : identifying the right prospects for your organization, incorporating key elements to make your proposal effective, writing the proposal, avoiding common mistakes, and building relationships. Prepared by Simone Joyaux for an international fundraising conference, October 2004. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DEVELOPMENT AUDIT
Internet Archive Link
This interactive audit will help you assess the fundraising strengths and weaknesses of your organization. Courtesy of the Gill Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SOURCES OF FUNDING
http://literacy.kent.edu/Oasis/grants/publicVSprivate.html
Advice and information on grant seeking and proposal writing from the Ohio Literacy Resource Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DIRECT MAIL FUNDRAISING: TESTING THE TRENDS
https://web.archive.org/web/20100823234132/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/Direct%20Mail%20Fundraising.pdf
Nonprofit fundraisers have discovered a slew of new direct-response technologies, but tried-and-true techniques like direct mail still bring in the most money. Fundraising consultants Fran Jacobowitz and Kay P. Lautman report on the latest trends in direct mail. They also explain how careful testing can improve the bottom line. Courtesy of the Grantsmanship Center News. Still available thanks to the Internet Archives.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DIRECTORS' AND VOLUNTEERS' FUNDRAISING ROLE
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/fundplan.htm
The board of directors is a vitally important part of every nonprofit organization's fundraising effort. A board that is enthusiastic about fundraising and determined to succeed virtually guarantees the nonprofit's long-term fiscal health. This article discusses the board's role in fundraising. Tips from Zimmerman, Lehman, a San Francisco consulting firm.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DISCOVER TOTAL RESOURCES : A GUIDE FOR NONPROFITS
http://www.gwpa.org/s_gwp/bin.asp?CID=4772&DID=10322&DOC=FILE.PDF
Advice from the Mellon Financial Corporation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DIVE INTO DEVELOPMENT PLANNING : PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice from the Gill Foundation. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DONOR WALL PLANNING : QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER WHEN PLANNING YOUR DONOR RECOGNITION DISPLAY
http://www.plannedlegacy.com/newsletter/donor-wall-planning-questions.html
A donor wall, recognition display, multimedia presentation or other similar initiative, should be a reflection of your nonprofit organization’s culture, vision and values. It should chronicle your organization’s history, celebrate achievements and provide dignified and distinctive recognition for donors, champions, volunteers, staff or others whose efforts have helped to further your organization’s mission, goals and accomplishments.
Contributed by George Williams, Planned Legacy, Suite 220 - 309 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, MB Canada R3A 1T3; Phone: (204) 943-3923 Ext. 302; Toll Free: (866) 882-3580 Ext. 302
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DON'T FORGET LOCAL BUSINESSES WHEN SEEKING FUNDING
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/business.htm
As nonprofits look for funding opportunities, they often forget one of the most readily available sources -- the local business community, says Federal & Foundation Assistance Monitor Editor Ray Sweeney. "Savvy Funding Tips", Federal & Foundation Assistance Monitor, December 11, 2009.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DOs AND DON'Ts OF GRANT PROPOSALS FOR TECH FUNDING
also called How to Conduct a Focus Group
http://www.tgci.com/sites/default/files/pdf/Dos%20and%20Donts%20of%20Grant%20Proposals%20for%20Tech%20Funding_0.pdf
As the needs of nonprofits for technology increase, so do the numbers of grant proposals for tech-related projects and equipment. America Online's Michele Cavataio has pored over thousands of requests for tech funding. She knows which ones click-and which ones don't. An online reprint of an article originally appearing in Nonprofits & Technology courtesy of the Grantsmanship Center News, Fall 2000. Still available thanks to the Internet Archives.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DOs AND DON'Ts OF GRANT WRITING
Internet Archive Link
This web site provides sound advice concerning the nine major parts of a grant proposal, including both dos and don'ts, courtesy of The Grantsmanship Center (Program Planning and Proposal Writing, Karen Denard Goldman and Kathleen Jahn Schmalz (Rutgers University), and Genesee Intermediate School District - Grants and Development Department (Grantwriting 101). Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DROWNING IN PAPERWORK, DISTRACTED FROM PURPOSE : CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN GRANT APPLICATION AND REPORTING
http://foundationcenter.org/gainknowledge/research/pdf/drowninginpaperwork.pdf
Are nonprofits drowning in paperwork and distracted from purpose as a result of grantmakers’ application and reporting requirements? Do the same practices that grantmakers use to increase effectiveness end up over-burdening both grantmakers and grantseekers — and diminishing their effectiveness? This research report commissioned by Project Streamline addresses these questions by examining current application and reporting practices and their impact on grantmakers and grantseekers alike. In short, we found that the current system creates significant burdens on the time, energy and ultimate effectiveness of nonprofit practitioners. Report written by Jessica Bearman, Bearman Consulting. Courtesy of Project StreamLine.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

DYSFUNCTIONAL ORGANIZATIONS -- A TWELVE-STEP PROGRAM FOR PROPOSAL WRITERS
Internet Archive Link
Only one job I ever had listed "sense of humor" as a qualification. It was only one that was truthful. My sense of humor has been critical to my career. Without the ability to laugh, I would have ended up quarantined to a cubicle or in therapy. I have decided that we are all dysfunctional on some level, as are our organizations. No one is perfect. The employment utopia we all seek is a fantasy. Every organization has its quirks, downfalls, and problems. It is what helps to define us. I sought to identify 12 Steps a proposal writer can implement in their professional lives. I realize there are more than twelve but then I could not use the catchy title. Source: Grants and Foundations Review, November 19, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EASYFUNDRAISINGIDEAS.COM
http://www.easy-fundraising-ideas.com/
This company lists many fundraising ideas and products for nonprofits.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EFFECTIVE BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS
Internet Archive Link
Budget justifications, or narratives, pose an interesting challenge for the grantwriter. In written form, the writer must articulate how a figure was derived; demonstrate its importance; and tie it to the overall proposal. In the best situation, the justification fits seamlessly into the proposal. In the worst situation, it ends up a jumbled mess that weakens the proposal. Advice from Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, July 16, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EFFECTIVE CAPACITY BUILDING IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
http://venturephilanthropypartners.org/learning/reports/capacity/capacity.html
Offers examples from thirteen nonprofit organizations that have engaged in capacity building activities. Explains why capacity building is essential and the primary steps involved in the process. A Capacity Assessment Grid assists in ascertaining a nonprofit's needs. Reston, VA: Venture Philanthropy Partners, 2001. 113pp.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EFFECTIVE FOUNDATION GRANTSEEKING STRATEGIES
http://www.mindspring.com/~ajgrant/m_jones.htm
An outline of a presentation made at a Case Corporate and Foundation Relations Conference held in Chicago on May 7, 1997. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR SEARCHING FOR YOUTH COURT FUNDING AND WRITING GRANTS : AN AUDIO TELECONFERENCE
http://www.youthcourt.net/?page_id=57
A 90-minute audio teleconference/webcast produced by the National Youth Court Center and Goff Brown Associates to provide information on writing effective grants, locating possible funding sources, and planning for program sustainability. Originally broadcast February 24, 2004. Link available toward bottom of web page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EIGHT STEPS TO FOLLOW WHEN CHOOSING FUND-RAISING COUNSEL
http://web.archive.org/web/20120313082524/http://www.aafrc.org/counsel/index.cfm
A guide provided by American Association of Fund Raising Counsel and the AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, now called the Giving Institute Note : Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EIGHT TIPS TO INVOLVE YOUR BOARD IN FUND RAISING
Internet Archive Link
This article is excerpted from "How to Involve Your Board in Fund Raising” from the New Jersey Grants Guide, a comprehensive resource designed specifically for New Jersey grant seekers. Richard I. Male, July 1999. Provided by Volunteers in Health Care. Note: 2nd article in set of three. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ELEMENTARY E-PHILANTHROPY
http://www.netaction.org/notes/notes53.html
http://www.netaction.org/notes/notes54.html
Michael Stein answers questions about signing up with online fundraising sites in NetAction Notes, Issue 53, December 27, 1999. The second link is to follow-up comments in the next issue.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ELEMENTS OF A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.hotwinds.com/Grant_Prop.html
Tips from the Center for Nonprofit Management via Hotwinds.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF GRANT WRITING AND FUND RAISING
http://www.urbanministry.org/wiki/encyclopedia-grant-writing-and-fund-raising
This section of the wiki contains how-to guides, templates, and fast research fact sheets for grant writing, as well as resources on fund raising and partnerships between government and faith-based organizations. A compilation of web links by UrbanMinistry.org.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ENTERPRISING NONPROFITS MEET BUSINESSES HALFWAY
Internet Archive Link
When Girls Scouts come knocking with boxes of cookies, they are selling a sweet example of social enterprise, a rapidly growing movement in nonprofit fundraising. Social enterprise uses an earned-income business, such as selling cookies door-to-door, to bring in revenue for a charitable mission. From its roots in sheltered workshops, hospital cafés and museum gift shops, social enterprise has become an international trend with the potential to generate significant funds for nonprofits. While the idea is not entirely new to the nonprofit sector, it has gained significant momentum in the new millennium. Article by Linda Ketchum, University of Alaska Anchorage professor of social enterprise appearing in Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue XII. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EPA GRANT-WRITING TUTORIAL
http://www.epa.gov/region7/citizens/care/pdf/epa_grant_writing_tutorial.pdf
This interactive software tool walks the user through the grant-writing process and helps them learn to write more competitive grants. The program includes: detailed information and tips on writing a grant proposal; how to complete a grant application package; program-specific sections on three EPA grant programs: (1) Environmental Justice, (2) Environmental Justice Through Pollution Prevention, and (3) Environmental Education; examples of good, complete grant packages; references; a glossary of terms; resources and contacts; a mock grant-writing activity where the user is able to compare their results to a successful grant application. [Also listed under Academic Fundraising].
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE ETIQUETTE OF GETTING GRANTS
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice from Shakurra Amatulla (The Grant Lady) featured in the New York Foundation for the Arts FYI Fall 2000 issue. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EVALUATING YOUR PROPOSAL PROGRAM
Internet Archive Link
One of the great mysteries within the sector -- and fund development programs -- is how we measure success. Funders will often dictate how they want the programs they fund evaluated or monitored. How we as administrators, proposal writers, and development officers measure success can be a bit less clear. Furthermore, what we evaluate is not necessarily the benchmark for success. Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, Grants and Foundations Review, April 20, 2004. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EVALUATION HANDBOOK
see W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION EVALUATION HANDBOOK

EVENT PLANNING 101
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/isss/wp-content/uploads/EventPlanning101.pdf
Tips for every stage of the event planning process. Advice from Kristin Gourley, Director of Student Involvement, Maryville College.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EVERY PROPOSAL NEEDS SIX ELEMENTS : WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, WHY, AND HOW. THE REST IS MERE COMMENTARY
http://blog.seliger.com/2008/07/21/every-proposal-needs-six-elements-who-what-where-when-why-and-how-the-rest-is-mere-commentary/
In writing a grant that describes a program, you are actually telling a story you want readers to believe. To do so, you need to make it as complete as possible. Journalists know that an effective lead paragraph in a news story tells the reader who, what, where, when, why, and how (together, the six are usually referred to as 5Ws and H). Well-written, interesting grant proposals should do the same for their readers, although not in the first paragraph. Before you start writing, you should be able to write a simple, declarative sentence answering each question. Courtesy of Seliger Associates.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT FUNDRAISING I LEARNED BY KNOCKING ON DOORS
Internet Archive Link
http://www.chardonpress.com/titles/everything.html
As you go forward with your fundraising program – writing proposals, designing direct mail appeals, meeting with major donors, etc. – keep these points in mind. An article by Andy Robinson reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 16, Number 4, copyright Chardon Press, 1997. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT FUNDRAISING I LEARNED BY KNOCKING ON DOORS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/92/fundrais.html
As you go forward with your fundraising program – writing proposals, designing direct mail appeals, meeting with major donors, etc. – keep these points in mind. An article by Andy Robinson, Shelterforce Online, Number 92, March/April 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FAQs ABOUT FOUNDATIONS
https://web.archive.org/web/20131002172759/http://www.cof.org/templates/41.cfm?ItemNumber=17611&navItemNumber=17702
Answers to frequently asked questions about foundation -- such as What is a Foundation, Starting a Foundation -- compiled by the Council on Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FC STATS
http://fdncenter.org/fc_stats/index.html
Statistical data on foundations and their grants from the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FEDERAL FUNDS FOR ORGANIZATIONS THAT HELP THOSE IN NEED
http://www.in.gov/ofbci/files/GrantsCatalog.pdf
This 70-page reference tool lists a wide variety of funding programs operated by federal agencies. The table of contents organizes these programs into broad areas of service (e.g., Abstinence Education, At-Risk Youth, Crime Prevention & Treatment, etc…). White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. 2006. Still available thanks to the state of Indiana.
(Last checked 07/26/06)

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS: NO FREE LUNCH
http://usgovinfo.about.com/library/weekly/aa060400a.htm
Contrary to what a very popular book and TV ad say, the U.S. government is not giving away "free grant" money. A grant is not a Christmas present. According to American Government & Politics, by Jay M. Shafritz, a grant is, "A form of gift that entails certain obligations on the part of the grantee and expectations on the part of the grantor." The key word there is obligations. Getting a government grant will get you loads of them and not fulfilling them will grant you a load of legal troubles. Source: About.com's Guide to Government Information.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A FEW GUIDELINES AND A COUPLE OF TRICKS FOR OVERCOMING FEAR OF DONORS
http://web.archive.org/web/20070714051342/http://www.rivernetwork.org/resource-library.php?ResourceID=707
This article is for all of us out there who would rather go to the dentist or undergo an IRS audit than ask someone for money face-to-face. It is for those sweaty-palmed, wooden-tongued, queasy-stomached souls who can think of a million things to do, including washing the cat, before picking up the phone to make an appointment for a fundraising visit. You know who you are, and you know what I am talking about. Article by Kevin J. Coyle posted by the River Network, June 5, 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A FEW IDEAS ABOUT PURSUING FEDERAL FUNDING
Internet Archive Link
Since Writing Season is just ahead and, also, since CEC regularly receives requests for assistance from individuals and agencies interested in applying for federal grants, we are devoting part of our CEC web site to the subject of grants and how you might go about getting them accepted for funding. We offer the following ideas and suggestions (but no guarantees) to those setting out in search of the elusive pot of gold. Advice from Ralph Nelsen. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE FINAL REPORT; OPENING THE DOOR TO YOUR NEXT GRANT
Internet Archive Link
When approached from the right frame of mind, reports serve as an excellent vehicle to obtain future support from the funder. First, the report puts your organization back in front of the people making funding decisions. It may have been as long as a year that you had substantive contact with the funder, especially if it was a corporation or small foundation. The final report is a great opportunity to reintroduce your organization or program to the sponsor. Second, you get to tell your story -- the successes (and challenges) you faced during the grant period. Write about the good work you have done and the problems you have solved. And third, you can lay the ground work for future funding needs; what you could not accomplish during the funding cycle, how the current program will be expanded or other opportunities you may have identified while carrying out the original project. Practical advice by Larry Trachtman, Grants and Foundations Report, Apr 1, 2003. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FINANCING A NONPROFIT PARKS ORGANIZATION
http://www.pps.org/pppp-chapter7/
A chapter from Public Parks, Private Partners, published by Project for Public Spaces, 2000.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FIND YOUR FUNDING : A CATALOG FOR RURAL HEALTH NETWORK RESOURCES
Internet Archive Link
A Georgia Health Policy Center publication. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FINDING AND UTILIZING GRANT-MAKERS ONLINE
Eight Basic Funding Research and Usage Steps
Internet Archive Link
The tracking and securing of grants for any nonprofit organization can significantly shape the financial underpinnings and enlarge its ability to deliver upon the mission for which it exists. This article proposes eight steps for securing grants using available online funding research tools. If all eight steps are followed your success rate for tracking and securing grants will increase dramatically. Article by Cindy Adams, President and CEO, GrantStation, and Jay Love, President and CEO, eTapestry provided by E-Philanthropy Review, Jun 3, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FINDING FUNDING: A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO FOUNDATION RESEARCH (5th edition)
Internet Archive Link
Grassroots activist organizations frequently need concise information about potential funding sources for social and economic justice projects. They want to find out about progressive foundations; basic steps to follow when researching and applying for grants; and how to contact grantmakers. While an overwhelming array of resources exist, many target more conservative or mainstream organizations. "Finding Funding" fills an important void by making the grant-seeking process for progressive activists more accessible. The list of foundations included in "Finding Funding" highlights a portion of the vast resources available for grant seekers. A thorough approach to finding appropriate grantmakers requires a clear focus on the particular needs and goals of your organization. "Finding Funding" provides some practical advice for beginning the grant-seeking and grant-writing process. Provided by Resist, Inc., 259 Elm Street, Somerville MA 02144, 617/623-5110. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FINDING FUNDING ONLINE: THE INTERNET AS A FUNDRAISING GUIDE
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/132/fundraising.html
At the beginning of 2003, nearly 81 percent of the 100 largest foundations and more than 1,600 of the 59,000 independent foundations provided information on the Internet. With more private foundations and charitable organizations creating a Web presence, the opportunities to find funding sources online have increased. Many foundations are just beginning to use their Web sites in constructive ways: posting quarterly and annual reports, newsletters, grant listings, guidelines and even interactive application forms. Article by Kief Schladweiler, Shelterforce Online, Issue 132, Nov./Dec. 2003.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

Finding Funds for Your Equipment, Programs, and People (Part 1 of 2)
http://www.campussafetymagazine.com/article/finding-funds-for-your-equipment-programs-and-people-part-1-of-2
Although budgets for campus safety and security can be tight, school districts, universities and hospitals that do their homework, are creative and are diligent can find a wide variety of grants, funding and other resources. Here’s Part I of Campus Safety magazine’s investigation on how these institutions can pay for their projects. Article by Robin Hattersley Gray, Campus Security magazine, Nov/Dec 2006.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

Finding Funds for Your Equipment, Programs, and People (Part 2 of 2)
http://www.campussafetymagazine.com/article/finding-funds-for-your-equipment-programs-and-people-part-2-of-2
Although grants often are the funding sources campuses first consider, alternative resources are available if school, university and hospital law enforcement agencies know where to look. Community partnerships, equipment donations, fees, asset forfeitures and the repurposing of budgets are just some of the other ways they can support their institutions, departments and goals. Article by Robin Hattersley Gray, Campus Security magazine, Jan/Feb 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FINDING SUSTAINABLE FUNDING FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS : STRATEGIC PLANNING AND PROGRAM EVALUATION
http://www-tcall.tamu.edu/newsletr/dec03/dec03n.htm
During the 1980's, start-up community based literacy organizations struggled to keep their doors open. Some programs failed, others flourished. Today, many still depend on restrictive grants, too few donors, and time-consuming fundraising events. The challenge for these non-profits is to find sustainable funds that will allow them to focus their limited resources on their missions, provide critical services, and strengthen their organizations. Article by Victoire Gerkens Sanborn appearing in Literacy Links, Volume 8, No. 1, December 2003.
(Last checked 05/12/05)

THE FINE ART OF ASKING FOR THE GIFT
http://www.ncdsv.org/images/The%20Fine%20Art%20of%20Asking%20for%20the%20Gift.pdf
Reprinted from Getting Major Gifts by Kim Klein, a publication of the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, copyright, Chardon Press, 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FISCAL AGENCY VERSUS FISCAL SPONSORSHIP
https://web.archive.org/web/20120505012426/http://www.foundationnews.org/CME/article.cfm?ID=3069
Everything you need to know to stay out of trouble with third-party representatives. Article by Jane C. Nober appearing in Foundation News and Commentary, November/December 2004, Vol. 45, No. 6.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE FIVE EYES OF FUNDRAISING
Internet Archive Link
To become a skillful pianist, you begin with the basic notes. To become an accomplished architect, you begin with the basic math. And, to become a professional fundraiser, you begin with the basic fundraising process. This process is often called the Five Eyes: identify, investigate, inform, involve, and invite. There are many variations of the Five Eyes and their origins are lost in antiquity. Although the steps are usually done in the order listed, the process is ongoing, with many restarts and overlaps, sometimes over a period of years. Advice from Wayne E. Groner, CFRE, E-Philanthropy Review, Sep 11, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOCUSING OUR FUNDING : WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION FUNDERS
Internet Archive Link
One of the key, but perhaps overworked, concepts in philanthropy is that of a funding focus. Every book and article about raising money from corporate and foundation funders exhorts nonprofit organizations to 1) learn about the grantmaker’s funding focus, 2) see if it matches your organization’s mission and strengths, and 3) only request funding if you have successfully completed 1) and 2). Article by Blythe Campbell, VP, Corporate Communications, Northrim Bank appearing in the Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume IV, Issue V. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A FORMULA FOR CORPORATE FUNDING
http://www.plannedlegacy.com/newsletter/10_02/corporate_funding.html
In tight economic times we need to think of all possible funding options. Corporate partners can help with funding events or special projects. Unlike government or foundation grants, businesses are less likely to fund established programs, research or operating expenses. Instead, companies like to support one-time events or new initiatives that reinforce their community involvement. Advice from Lawrence H. Trachtman, Grants and Foundations Review, July 2, 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION CENTER'S FUNDING PROSPECT WORKSHEET
http://fdncenter.org/findfunders/wrksheet/index.html
A worksheet designed to assist grant seekers focus on funders whose priorities closely match your own.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION CENTER'S GUIDE TO FUNDING RESEARCH
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/gfr/
If you are a first-time grantseeker, a new nonprofit staff or board member, or a volunteer for your favorite charity, this online guide was created with you in mind. It is intended both as a basic primer on the grantseeking process and as an introduction to the resources available. Free online advice for those who can't attend a regularly scheduled training session.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION CENTER'S PROPOSAL BUDGETING BASICS
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/prop_budgt/
This online course is designed to help with the basics of developing a project budget, and it is geared for those who have general knowledge of proposal development. (Beginners might want to take the Proposal Writing Short Course first.) Free online advice for those who can't attend a regularly scheduled training session.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION CENTER'S PROPOSAL WRITING SHORT COURSE
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/shortcourse/
The subject of this short course is proposal writing. But the proposal does not stand alone. It must be part of a process of planning and of research on, outreach to, and cultivation of potential foundation and corporate donors. Free online advice for those who can't attend a regularly scheduled training session.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION CULTURE
http://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/Foundations.html
An alternative viewpoint by Gina Neff which appeared in the Left Business Observer, #70, November 1995.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION EVALUATION HANDBOOK
http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge-center/resources/2006/02/WK-Kellogg-Foundation-Evaluation-Handbook.aspx
This handbook provides a framework for thinking about evaluation as a relevant and useful program tool. It was written primarily for project directors who have direct responsibility for the ongoing evaluation of W. K. Kellogg Foundation-funded projects.
Also listed under W. K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Handbook.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FOUNDATION RESEARCH 101
http://www.jankowskiresearch.com/Research101.htm
Each foundation has its own characteristics and personality. Understanding its giving patterns can open doors to cultivating a long-term relationship. As you know, identifying and analyzing potential sources of funding takes research, getting acquainted, doing your homework, uncovering information, digging up data, leaving no stone unturned, noticing the details . . . time! A foundation's listing of grant recipients is the clearest, most precise record of its charitable preferences. Research 101 will get you started. Courtesy of Jankowski Research, a fundraising firm located in the Maryland area.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FREELANCERS...WHERE THE WORK IS
Internet Archive Link
You have most likely heard the phrase "you have to have money to make money." In a way, freelance grant writing is like that. You build your freelance business upon your past successes as a grant proposal writer. When a potential client interviews you, he or she will ask about your success rate. Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, September 10, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FRIENDRAISING AND YOUR BOARD
http://www.help4nonprofits.com/NPLibrary/NP_Bd_FriendRaising-EngagingFriends_Art.htm
If your board members don’t want to fundraise, you are not alone. Learn how board members can comfortably help the organization by focusing on raising friends. Article by Hildy Gottlieb, ReSolve, Inc. 2003. Still available thanks to Help 4 Nonprofits, Community-Deiven Institute.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FRIENDRAISING : RAISING FUNDS, FINDING FRIENDS TO REALIZE BOLD COMMUNITY VISIONS : A WORKBOOK
http://tamarackcommunity.ca/downloads/tools/friendraising.pdf
A basic tenet of fundraising is that bigger gifts come from people who have come to know and love your organization and its mission. This booklet by Paul Born from The Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement (2005) provides practical advice on developing the contacts that lead to major gifts.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FRONTLINE FUNDRAISING TOOLKIT
http://www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/frontlinefundraising
Practical advice from the American Library Association's Development Office, April 27, 2011.

FUND RAISING, SEE FUNDRAISING.

FUNDCLASS: ONLINE FUNDRAISING SCHOOL
http://www.fundraisersoftware.com/library/fundclass/
These are the archives of 36 past FundClass lessons - they're a very rich source of fundraising information on a broad range of topics. FundClass was a free email list used for teaching fundraising lessons in an informal online "classroom" in which veteran fundraisers shared their knowledge on a chosen topic with those who were new to fundraising. The List was run by volunteers and sponsored by FundRaiser Software since its first class in 1997 until its last class in 2003.

(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
http://web.archive.org/web/20060929015422/http://www.michigantownships.org/downloads/june05.pdf
Advice for townships on how to fund capital improvements by James K. White. Michigan Township News, June 2005. Note : Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES : A RESOURCE LIST
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/topical/disabilities.html
(Last checked 05/04/06)

FUNDING FUND RAISING REPORT
http://nccsdataweb.urban.org/PubApps/levis/funding.html
A study by Frederick Lane, Baruch College, Department of Public Administration, which also appeared in the June 1989 issue of Philanthropy Monthly. The study was designed to collect and make widely available significant recent experience in a growing field of philanthropy -- funding fund raising.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING RESEARCH: MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR TIME TO PRODUCE GOOD MATCHES
Internet Archive Link
Federal funds, private foundations, corporate giving programs -- opportunities for grant funding abound. As a grant proposal writer, you know that the best proposal in the world won’t stand up if it is not a good match to funder priorities. With limited time, how do you go about identifying good sources of funding. Article by Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, Aug 6, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING SOURCES: WHO THEY ARE AND HOW TO USE THEM
http://www.venturesfoundation.org/pubs/other/fundingsources.pdf
Requries adobe acrobat. Contents: The Seven Sources of Funds for Nonprofits; Finding out About Government Funding; Philanthropic Foundations; Corporate Giving; Non-Monetary Sources of Support; Getting Money from Individuals; and Gift-vs-Grant. Courtesy of Bill Somerville, President, Philanthropic Ventures Foudnation, Oakland, Ca.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING SOURCES: TAPPING THE PHILANTHROPIC WELL
http://www.raise-funds.com/1999/tapping-the-philanthropic-well/
As you are aware, no fund-raising campaign should be started until you have identified the sources from which you will draw contributions. Sources here does not refer to specific potential donors, but to the six categories of donors who contribute money to non-profit organizations. They are:

Source: Tony Poderis, January Fund-Raising Forum.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING TRENDS AND ANALYSIS RESOURCES
National Trends
Regional Trends
International Trends
Special Topics Trends
Provides highlights from recent reports from the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDING YOUR LIBRARY OUTREACH PROGRAM
Internet Archive Link
Advice from the Idaho State Library. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISERHELP.COM
http://www.fundraiserhelp.com/
Fundraiser Help provides fundraising event ideas and tips on school fundraising, church fundraisers, and any type of youth group product fundraiser. Browse our articles for techniques guaranteed to improve your results.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISER INSIGHT
http://www.fundraiserinsight.org/
The site contains a ton of articles to help people new or old to fundraising and has an ideas section of 100 fundraising ideas that are unique in nature and don’t require selling the same old products. Additionally, we also have free thermometers that organizations can use on their site.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND$RAISER YELLOW PAGES
http://www.fundraising-yellow-pages.com/
A directory of companies that provide products and services that are re-sold by nonprofit groups for fundraising purposes. Abstract supplied by Deane Brengle, brengled@fundsraiser.com.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISERS FOR CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.funattic.com/fundrais.htm
Fundraising ideas from Fund-Attic.
(Last checked 07/31/14)


There has been much debate over the years about whether fundraising is spelled "fundraising", "fund-raising" (with a hyphen) or "fund raising" with a space. And the final answer is? There isn't one. Depending on the source you ask (dictionaries, encyclopedias, wikis and more) you'll find multiple answers. So if you are looking for a specific web site, be flexible as you look through the following entries.
FUNDRAISING
Internet Archive Link
Lists fundraisers for youth groups interested in raising money for travel. Courtesy of Explorations in Travel, Inc. [Also listed under Fundraising for Educators.] Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES/IDEAS FROM Envision.ca
http://www.envision.ca/templates/resources.asp?ID=94
Imagination and planning are key factors to the success of a fundraising campaign. Organizers should base fundraising decisions on the circumstances of their organization and the kinds of resources available for carrying out an event or activity. The following are examples of fundraising activities you may want to consider for your next campaign: Valentine Flowers to Go; Talent Show; Sled-a-Thon; Goods, Services and Talent Auction; Ticket Raffle; Lip-Sync Contest; Menu Auction; 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament; Easter Mystery Eggs; Party in the Park; Fashion Show; Culinary Carnival; Mathematics Marathon; Halloween Horribles Parade; Mud Volleyball Tournament; Tennis Ball Racing; Perennial Plant Sale; Non-Events; Special Movie Screening; Goods and Services Bingo; Poinsettia Sale; Children’s Sing-Along.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING AND FRIENDRAISING ON THE WEB
http://fund-online.com/alabook/welcome.htm
Offers a sampling of chapters from the CD Companion to , Fundraising and Friend-Raising on the Web, by Adam Corson-Finnerty and Laura Blanchard, and which is also available in the MSU Libraries.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES
http://www.cityscholars.org/documents/June2011FundraisingandResourceDevelopmentROUNDTABLERESOURCES.pdf
City Scholars Foundation of Los Angeles, CA, provides a compilation of resources including: Conducting an Asset Inventiory, Do you need a development director, How we rate charities (Charity Navigator), Fundraising Planning Worksheet, and 90 Day Action Guide.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING AUTHORITY
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/about/
Offers advice on how to raise money for schools, churches, and other non-profit organizations and charities.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING BASICS : THE OLD AND THE NEW
http://www.guidestar.org/news/features/fundraisingbasics.jsp
With new and emerging technologies surfacing in the fundraising realm, fundraisers today have a plethora of choices. Strategies and plans have become more complex and require the use of a variety of tactics. How is a nonprofit to determine which tactics to use and decipher which ones will net the best response?
Note: you can also access other articles from the Guidestar archives via this site.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND-RAISING.COM
http://www.fund-raising.com/
Although primarily designed to market fundraising products and services, this web page also provides additional information as well, broken out into the following four categories:

(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISINGDEALS.COM
http://www.FundraisingDeals.com/
An easy-to-use fundraising directory that provides a variety of innovative ideas, products and services specific to fundraising. You can search through the directory of fundraising ideas in order to find the fundraising idea that is best suited for your next fundraiser. The free membership allows access to exclusive vendor Deals. Source: Nathan Shurtleff, Telephone: 603-264-4105; E-mail: Nshurtleff@FundraisingDeals.com
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING DIRECTORY: A GUIDE TO FUNDRASING FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION
http://www.fundraisingdirectory.com/
Identifies over 100 fundrasing companies as well as many other fundraising resources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING ETHICS: A SELECTED RESOURCES LIST
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/topical/ethics.html
In recent years, controversies at major nonprofit organizations have created new public concern about, and focused media attention on, the ethics of fundraising. National trade and professional groups have responded with the establishment or revision of codes of ethics for their members. This selected reading list contains citations to selected works from the Foundation Center's bibliographic database on the topic of fundraising ethics.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FAQ
http://www.impactalliance.org/ev_en.php?ID=2079_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC
The purpose of this FAQ is to discuss some of the reasons that asking for money is hard and to provide some tips to help people get over the fear of asking for money. Includes "55 Ways for Board Members to Raise $500". Courtesy of Impact Alliance.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR A SKATEPARK
http://www.skateparkguide.com/fundraising.html
Practical advice on raising funds for a skateboard park from Anthony Gembeck, TransWorld Skateboard Business Magazine.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR HEALTH : A RESOURCE LIST
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/topical/health.html
Recent studies suggest that grants for health-related purposes continue to command a large share of foundation giving. The following online bibliography should be helpful for nonprofit organizations and individuals looking for private and government funding. This resource list contains citations to selected works from the Foundation Center's bibliographic database Catalog of Nonprofit Literature as well as links to useful Web resources. For complete bibliographies on these topics, search Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, using the following health-related headings in the subject field: Aging, AIDS, Gerontology, Health, Health care, Hospices, Hospitals, Medicine, Mental health, Nursing, Public health, or Substance abuse. You may also want to browse our other topical resources lists on Health Conversion Foundations and Funding for People with Disabilities.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION : A RESOURCE LIST
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/topical/education.html
Both the Foundation Center’s Update on Funding for Higher and Graduate Educational Institutions and the Council for Aid to Education’s Voluntary Support of Education recently reported that after years of consistent growth, support for higher educational institutions declined in 2002. Now more than ever, colleges and universities need to examine best practices in fundraising and emerging trends as they seek funding from alumni, foundations, and corporations. This resource list contains citations to selected works from the Foundation Center's bibliographic database, Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, for advancement professionals and staff members involved in fundraising for higher education. For complete bibliographies on related topics, search Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, using the following subject headings: Fundraising--higher education, Fundraising--alumni, and Higher education-finance.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR HOSPITALS OR HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS : A RESOURCE LIST
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/topical/hospitals.html
As medical costs continue to rise, maintaining your hospital's fiscal health is more important than ever. This resource list, which contains citations to selected works from the Foundation Center's bibliographic database, Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, will help you explore emerging trends in health philanthropy and assist you with developing a fundraising strategy for your organization. For complete bibliographies on related topics, search Catalog of Nonprofit Literature, using headings such as Hospitals or Health Care in the Subject field. See also Fundraising For Health: A Resource List for more information in specific fields such as AIDS or medical research.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR SMALL NONPROFITS
Internet Archive Link
Small NonProfits think of marketing and fundraising as some foreign land - a magical kingdom where experts dwell; a place where you have to have large amounts of money to start with, and equally large amounts of expertise. The truth is that all NonProfits hold the key to their own success, right there in their own fingers! And those keys are simple:
(1) Know what you want to accomplish
(2) Create a plan
(3) Stay away from the pull of the negative
(4) Build on the assets you have
(5) The most important assets you have are your relationships
Article by Hildy Gottlieb, Resolve Inc, 1999 via National Charter School Clearinghouse (NCSC) News, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR YOUTH GROUPS
Internet Archive Link
To help subsidize travel opportunities for students many schools try fund raising. When the students and community have had as many car washes, bake sales and chocolate bars that they can handle, it is time to get creative. The following ideas should help inspire some alternative approaches to raising money. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FOR YOUTH GROUPS
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/fundraising-for-youth-groups-23272.html
Youth Groups are almost always in need of funds. Holding fundraisers to finance important trips like tournaments, museums, and musical events are just some of the needs that have to be met through fundraising. Others include the need for uniforms, sports equipment, art supplies, musical instruments, and more. D. David Dugan.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND RAISING FORUM LIBRARY
Also listed as Tony Poderis's Fund Raising Forum Library
http://www.raise-funds.com/table-of-contents-2/
An ever expanding library of articles featuring development tips and techniques by Tony Poderis.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS
http://nonprofit.about.com/od/fundraising/a/fundraising101.htm
Where does the money come from?
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS : PARTICIPANT'S WORKBOOK
Internet Archive Link
Courtesy of the Gill Foundation. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING GURU (BLOG)
http://www.fundraisingguru.blogspot.com/
Dr. Stephen L. Goldstein is the host of "Fundraising Success," a weekly, one-hour radio show/Internet radio/podcast available at any time from anywhere in the world at www.wxelpodcasts.org and broadcast on WXEL National Public Radio member station--90.7 FM in South Florida, Sundays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ET, when it is also Internet-streamed. "Fundraising Success" brings the best advice to nonprofits from experts nationwide.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING IDEAS BLOG
http://ideas4fundraising.blogspot.com/
Offering a wide variety of fundraising ideas for all types of group fundraisers.These unique fundraising ideas should help you get those creative juices flowing.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING IDEAS & PRODUCTS CENTER
http://www.fundraising-ideas.org/
Directory of fundraising companies offering traditional, unique and sometimes even bizarre fundraiser ideas for educators and other groups of all sizes and interests.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING IDEAS: PRODUCTS, ONLINE, EVENTS, FUNDRAISER HELP
http://www.fundraisingip.com/
Provides help for planning, running and improving your product, online, e-mail or in-person fundraising events.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING IN A DIFFICULT ECONOMY
http://www.afpnet.org/ResourceCenter/ArticleDetail.cfm?ItemNumber=4011
Greeted every morning with news of falling stocks and debates on whether the U.S. economy is in recession, charitable spending right now is likely not on the top of many donors’ priorities—a daunting thought for fundraisers looking for strong fourth-quarter income. Advice from the Association of Fundraising Professionals.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING IN CYBERSPACE
Internet Archive Link
Direct E-Mail Campaigns, Virtual Volunteers, Annual Fund Drives Online. Does the Information Superhighway lead to new horizons or a dead end? An article by Marc Green appearing in the fall 1995 issue of Grantsmanship Center News. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING KNOW HOW
http://fundraising-know-how.com/
Offers information about fundraising including items to sell.
(Last checked 10/10/05)

FUNDRAISING : KNOW YOUR S.W.O.T. (STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND THREATS)
Internet Archive Link
An online article by Bill J. Harrison excerpted from Fundraising: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING LETTERS TIPS FROM STEP-BY-STEP FUNDRAISING
http://stepbystepfundraising.com/category/fundraising-letters/
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING: MORE THAN JUST GETTING THE MONEY FOR FREE
Internet Archive Link
Fundraising should be a large part of any organization's revenue generation. However, don't be fooled into believing that this type of money-making is easy. Anyone who has been involved in trying to raise funds for hosting an event, publishing a newsletter or opposing a development knows how much behind-the-scenes work is required. Practical advice from Victoria Humphries, FOCA. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING ON THE INTERNET: ACQUIRING AND CULTIVATING DONORS WITH E-MAIL AND THE WEB
Internet Archive Link
The Internet offers wonderful tools for building relationships with donors - giving them the information they want when they want it, allowing them to participate from anywhere in the world and offer their instant feedback. To find out what works, nonprofit organizations need to start making serious investments in using the Internet for membership and fundraising. Advice from Nick Allen, Mal Warwick & Associates, Inc. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING PRODUCTIVITY SERIES : COLLECTED ESSAYS BY BILL LEWIS
http://nccsdataweb.urban.org/PubApps/levis/fps.html
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING READINESS: HOW DOES YOUR AGENCY STACK UP?
Internet Archive Link
Online article by Brigette Sarabi appearing in the Summer 1997 issue of the Grantsmanship Center Magazine. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING RESOURCE GUIDE
http://www.fundraising-ideas.org/directory/guide.pdf
A guide prepared to make it easier and quicker for fundraisers to find the most appropriate fundraising project for your group. It contains product information for a wide variety of independent companies. Categories include: Bricks, Plaques, and Tiles; Candles, Soaps, Scents,and Lotions; Candy, Chocolate, and Lollipops; Catalogs and Brochures; Christmas and Collectibles; Cookbooks; Cookie Dough; Discount Cards and Books; First Aid and Safety Products; Flowers, Bulbs, Trees, and Plants; Greeting Cards, Stationary, and Gift Wrap; Magazines and Books; Pizza and Pasta; Scratch Cards; Snacks, Gourmet Foods, and other Food Treats; Special Events; Spirit, Logo, and Personalized Items; Telecomm: Cellular, Internet, Long Distance; T-Shirts and Other Apparel; and Unique Surprises. Courtesy of the Fundraising Ideas and Products Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING RESOURCES FOR ANIMAL SHELTERS
http://www.animalsheltering.org/resources/all-topics/fundraising.html
A compilation of resources from Animal Sheltering.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING : SOME BASIC ADVICE
http://www.npccny.org/info/fr14.htm
The Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York, Inc. (NPCC) recently hosted several workshops on fundraising and grant writing. Ellen Karsh and Sue Fox, authors of a recently published book, The Only Grant-Writing Book You’ll Ever Need, which includes both their suggestions as grant writers and the results of their interviews with a variety of government and foundation funders, hosted two sessions, and Ilene Mack, senior program officer at the Hearst Foundations, discussed what she likes to see in a proposal and why the playing field isn’t level. The advice offered by these practitioners is summarized in this article.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND RAISING STORIES AND JOKES
Internet Archive Link
A collection of fundraising stories and jokes from the American Fundraising Institute (AFRI). Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING: THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice on grants for board members adapted from book by Bill J. Harrison. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND RAISING: THE OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO OUTDOOR PROGRAMS
http://www.isu.edu/outdoor/funding.htm
Fund raising is an aspect of income generation that many in the outdoor recreation field shrugged off. There's a mistaken feeling out there that fund raising just won't work for outdoor activity programs. That couldn't be further from the truth. To wit: Outward Bound Schools generate ten of thousands of dollars a year for scholarships and programs, the Cornell University Outdoor Education Program received a $160,000 donation to build a climbing wall and another $50,000 to start an equipment outfitting center, and over the past 10 years, the Idaho State University Outdoor Program has brought in nearly one million dollars of outside funds. There is no one set way of fund raising that works for everyone. You'll need to evaluate and dabble with several methods before settling on some that work well in your situation. For the purposes of this paper, I'll discuss four broad categories: grants, fund raising events, non- cash donations and cash contributions. Paper by Ron Watters, Idaho State University, Outdoor Program.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING TRENDS
Internet Archive Link
This article discuss that how in the early 1990s, funders began to de-emphasize projects that dealt with intractable problems on a grand scale, in favor of projects that address more manageable problems on a local level. It goes on to explain how that trend is continues into the first decade of the 21st Century. Courtesy of GrantStation. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUNDRAISING TUESDAYS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/133/fundraising.html
Why does Fundraising Tuesday work? Every other workday brings surprises and immense challenge. On Tuesday, we have only one thing to accomplish – raise money and resources. Article by Anjie Saunders, Shelterforce Online, #133, Jan./Feb. 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

FUND RAISING TUTORIAL
http://www.enterprisecommunity.org/resources/tutorials/fundraising/
Practical advice from the Enterprise Foundation. Current sections include:

(Last checked 07/31/14)

GENERAL GRANT WRITING TIPS
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Grant_Writing_Tips_2003_58006_7.ppt
A powerpoint presentation by the Michigan Department of Community Health.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GET A HEAD START : PREPARE FOR GRANT WRITING
http://www.policegrantshelp.com/news/1957479-Get-a-head-start-Prepare-for-grant-writing/
Secrets to Getting Police Grants with Denise Schlegel. Your Chief has handed you a funding announcement for a grant and you see that it is due in three weeks. Congratulations, you have been selected to write the grant and “get the money”! As you sit there fingering through the request for proposal, you wonder how much time this is going to take. You are also wondering how you are going to get this done with all of your other duties you have as an officer. You may even be thinking that you haven’t a clue how to get started.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GETTING FUNDED IN A GATES/BUFFET WORLD
http://ext.wsu.edu/aec/secondary/documents/PRIITVGrantwriting-November172006.ppt
Powerpoint presentation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GETTING MAJOR GIFTS
Internet Archive Link
For most organizations, the vast majority of contributions they receive will be small, but the majority of their income will come from a few big donations. That's why it's essential to have a clear understanding of how to get those big donations. Grassroots fundraising expert Kim Klein lays out the basic principles of securing major gifts and provides a step-by-step approach to the fine art of asking. She also answers some common questions about the care and feeding of major donors.Practical advice from Kim Klein, publisher of the Grassroots Fundraising Journal. Article appears in the Grantsmanship Center Magazine. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GETTING ON THE WEB
Internet Archive Link
An online article by Kurt Hansen, Founder and President of CharityWeb. Part of Guidestar's Nonprofit Management 101 Series. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GETTING THE GRANT 101
http://www.tgci.com/articles/getting-grant-101
The process of “getting a grant” or “writing a grant proposal” can sound mysterious, like an old family recipe with secret ingredients. For 40 years The Grantsmanship Center has been helping people de-mystify this process and to understand that like a recipe, creating a compelling proposal simply requires common ingredients put together in a logical and understandable sequence using tried and true techniques. - See more at: http://www.tgci.com/archive#sthash.1zDUXnWM.dpuf
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GETTING YOUR BOARD ON BOARD
Internet Archive Link
As sensible and noble as it may sound, the job of building a base of true lifelong donors for your organization can be a little lonely. Even though everyone may pay it lip service, when it comes to that nasty word "fundraising," most people would rather look the other way. In the face of apathy or downright resistance, the first place most people look for support is to the board. After all, as we all know, fundraising is their job. Then why is it the board can seem so resigned and contrary? What will it take to get your board on board? Article by Terry Axelrod, Nonprofit Leader, July 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GIVE YOUR PROPOSAL THE WINNING EDGE
http://www.multiculturaladvantage.com/opportunity/grants/read/Give-Your-Proposal-the-Winning-Edge.asp
You've tweaked the text, finalized the supporting data and compiled pages of required attachments. If you've been attentive - and lucky - enough to finish your proposal with time to spare, how might you make your document stand out above the pack? Courtesy of Susan Schaefer, The Multicultural Advantage, January 13, 2005.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GIVESPOT.COM
http://www.givespot.com/
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GLOSSARY OF PHILANTHROPIC TERMS
http://www.cof.org/content/glossary-philanthropic-terms
Courtesy of the Council on Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND OBJECTIVES -- KEEPING THEM STRAIGHT
Internet Archive Link
Funders do not use the same "dictionary" when defining the terms within RFA's. The definitions for Goals, Outcomes, Objectives, and Activities can vary dramatically by funder. What one funder considers an outcome another may deem an objective. In some cases your goal may actually be an outcome. The terms represent a set of indicators you are using to identify desired change and to measure that change. Practical advice by Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, Aug 5, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GOODSEARCH.COM
http://www.goodsearch.com
For many of us, conducting an Internet search is a daily part of life; Googling has become as habitual and regular as your morning cup of coffee. With that in mind, two tech dudes — Ken and JJ Ramberg — created the site goodsearch.com, which contributes a portion of its revenue, per search, to a charity of the user's choice. The site, which was founded in January, donates 50 percent of its ad revenue to any charity the user selects from a list of registered schools, organizations and nonprofits. And while that percentage only amounts to a penny per search, given the massive amount of traffic most search engines receive, that copper adds up quick. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has earned more than $1,500 in the past year.

Motor City charities are well-represented on the site — among them are the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, the DSO, Greening of Detroit and the Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation — but many of them aren't getting much love. As of this writing, the Detroit Science Center had earned a paltry 2 cents, and Mosaic Youth Theatre had earned all of a buck and a quarter. So get to searchin' and help provide some of Detroit's hard-working nonprofits with some much-needed cash — all it takes is the click of a button. Sure, it's not as convenient as the little Google search bar in your browser, but, Christ, are you really that lazy?
Source : Metro Times, Backslash, November 15, 2006.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GOVERNMENT GRANT WRITING : DOING IT YOURSELF
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzkeHnsW_zU
Government grant writing isn't like writing an article or a letter, you need to include very specific, very detailed information so the decision makers have everything they need in order to choose you to receive the money. Most people prefer to keep their tips for success a secret, but you can still learn how to write a successful proposal and get the most out of your application. If you need more help with government grants writing, then you should check out http://www.governmentgrantsource.net . The site features a full database of government grants, as well as tutorials and samples to help you write the best proposal possible.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT APPLICATION ADVICE
http://www.stopvaw.org/Grant_Applications.html
Advice from Stop Violence Against Women : The Advocates for Human Rights.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT COSTS : ARE THEY WORTH IT?
http://www.wholonomyconsulting.com/docs/grant-costs-are-they-worth-it.pdf
What do getting a grant and taking a payday loan have in common? Answer: They may cost you much more than what you receive. Article by Cassandra O'Neill, Charity Channel, July 4, 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT FUNDS: MONEY IS WHERE YOU FIND IT
Internet Archive Link
An online article by Bill Clede appearing in the July 1996 issue of Law and Order. Focuses on providing advice to local police departments on how to go about finding grant money. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT MAKERS REVEAL THE MOST COMMON REASONS GRANT PROPOSALS GET REJECTED
http://philanthropy.com/jobs/2003/05/01/20030523-378096.htm
The reason many grant proposals don't pass muster: The applicants didn't do their homework adequately. Article by Marilyn Dickey appearing in the Chronicle of Philanthropy, April 24, 2003.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL COMPONENTS
http://www.prm.nau.edu/prm426/grant_proposal_components.htm
Couresy of Northern Arizona University.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL COMPONENTS
https://4good.org/4good/grant-proposal-components All nine parts from IdeaEncore from GrantStation's 2010 Tracks to Success series on grant proposals. Each part outlines an important component of grant proposals, and contains multiple examples from successfully funded grant proposals, along with links to the full proposals. Components outlined in this guide include the introduction, organization history, statement of need or problem, project or program narrative, goals and objectives, plan of action or work plan, evaluation and measurement, timeline, budget, and logic model. Special thanks to the Ink People Center for the Arts, Academy for Educational Development (AED), Center for Leadership Development, Pacific Ridge School, Shoes that Fit, Little Tokyo Service Center, Family Services Association of Western Riverside County (FSA), and ElderHelp for sharing their successfully funded proposals and allowing IdeaEncore to use them as examples.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT (Michigan State University Library)
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/crsrpt.htm
This Congressional Research Service report offers suggestions for finding appropriate sources of Federal and private project funding. It describes major components of the written grant proposal and gives basic guidelines for developing, organizing, and writing the proposal.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING LEADERSHIP MANUAL
http://www.investinneighborhoods.com/grants.html
Courtesy of Invest in Neighborhoods, Inc. (Cincinnati, OH).
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING: LINKS, RESOURCES, AND COLUMNS
http://www.wilbers.com/grants.htm
Advice from Stephen Wilburs. Articles first appeared in Minneapolis Star Tribune.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING TIPS
http://web.archive.org/web/20111229044721/http://www.cpb.org/grants/grantwriting.html
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting evaluates hundreds of proposals each year for a variety of funding purposes. This publication is an easy guide to the basic elements of grant writing and is offered to assist applicants to CPB and to other funding sources. It offers guideposts to help you through each stage of the process. [Also listed under Academic Fundraising]
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT READINESS ASSESSMENT
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=mp_2fk7EJ2Yjabf6rLnF_2fVhA_3d_3d
Grant readiness assessment tool provide by Procifica.org
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT RESOURCES & RESPONSIBILITIES FOR TOWNSHIPS
http://web.archive.org/web/20060929015559/http://www.michigantownships.org/downloads/october02.pdf
http://web.archive.org/web/20060929015348/http://www.michigantownships.org/downloads/grant_resources_and_responsibilities_for_townships_october02.pdf
Is your township planning a new project, but coming up a little short on funding? A wide area of untapped funds is available to townships--in the form of grants from state and federal government, and from private corporations. Although the grant writing process may seem daunting, this article shows you where to look for grants, what to include in a grant proposal and how to prepare yourself for grant writing success. Beverly A. Browning. (Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT SEEKER'S CHECKLIST
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/fam.htm
A brief list of tips from the publishers of the Federal Assistance Monitor.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A GRANT SEEKER'S GUIDE TO THE INTERNET : REVISED AND REVISITED
http://www.nonprofit.net/info/guide.html
"Today Internet access is widely available at reasonable rates. Information about grants and other useful material for nonprofit organizations abounds. Any organization with a computer and modem will be able to conduct sophisticated searches and keep current right from their offices. In this update, we'll take a tour of what's new and expanded. We'll also point out some areas related to grants for which information is still scarce on the Internet." Courtesy of Andrew J. Grant and Suzy D. Sonenberg.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTSEEKER'S TOOLBOX
http://www.donorsforum.org/s_donorsforum/sec.asp?CID=10815&DID=24203
Useful advice from the Donor's Forum in Chicago. Provides general information on the fundraising processs such as:
(1) Are you ready to seek funding? : Whether you're a nonprofit or an individual, start here to learn the ropes.
(2) What do you need funding for? : Questions you need to ask before you begin researching funders: What kind of need do you have? What will the money be used for? What are the various kinds of funding?
(3 Understanding the funding mix : Various kinds of funders and which ones are best for different kinds of funding. (4) Researching potential funding sources and donors : Where to look for information on potential sources, who gives money to what organizations, how much to ask for, finding guidelines and deadlines.
(5) Making contact with donors : Preparing a proposal, building relationships with funders, the Chicago Area Grant Application, following up.
(6) Donors Forum tools and resources : The Donors Forum Library, joining the Donors Forum, workshops and Fundraising and Management Workshops, online tools, publications, glossary.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTSEEKING BASICS
http://grantspace.org/Classroom/Online-Classes/Grantseeking-Basics-Webinar
A free webinar available from the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITER AS CONSULTANT
Internet Archive Link
If you're like me, you've been asked many times if you freelance, providing consulting services for non-profits looking to start or improve their grants procurement efforts. The grant writer as consultant often falls into the process because a friend asks her to help out an organization with which he is affiliated or because of an inner need to strike out on her or her own. From those humble beginnings, successful consulting companies are often born. However, by not employing some basic concepts, the newbie grant consultant can set herself up for failure. Source: Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, Apr 27, 2004. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING 101
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/gw101.htm
Sample e-mail communication from Grants and Foundations Review (TM). Provides information on how to subscribe to this mailing list.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING 101 : TIPS FOR NOVICE PROPOSAL WRITERS
Internet Archive Link
All too often, people approach grantwriting as a mysterious craft or as something you can do in your spare time. While learning to write grants does not require a secret handshake, it is a refined skill that can't be undertaken in an afternoon of "downtime." After eight years of writing grants for a variety of public and private employers and clients, I have identified a series of "trade secrets" I wish someone had shared with me when I started. Advice from Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, April 16, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING: A BEST PRACTICE GUIDE
http://web.archive.org/web/20100528162759/http://www.austincc.edu/npo/library/documents/Grant%20Writing%20A%20Best%20Practice%20Guide.pdf
Many law enforcement agencies today utilize grants, which are available from a variety of agencies including the federal government, to fund their programs. Public sector grants are primarily federal and state grants made to local and state governments or to government agencies. The process of securing grant funds requires the completion of a grant proposal, a process that is summarized in this outline. Advice from Bridget Newell, Ph.D. Originally posted by the International Association of Police Chiefs. Note : Link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTWRITING : BASICS FOR BEGINNERS 101
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/grantwriting-basics-beginners-001/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-10-06
Very basic information for people who are totally new to the subject of applying for grant funding for their nonprofit agency. Courtesy of Carol Geisbauer Grantwriting
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTWRITING BASICS : FUNDAMENTALS THAT DRIVE YOUR GRANTWRITING SUCCESS!
http://web.archive.org/web/20040216225806/http://www.megrants.org/mpc/nonprofits/grantwriting.cfm
The grantseeking/ grantmaking process is all about building a partnership.This careful prospect research, needs and resources analysis by the Grantseeker is critical. Taking the time to build a relationship - to build a match, then submit a well thought through and complete application - certainly helps the process work better - for both partners. Advice shared by the Maine Philanthropy Center. Also includes Top 45 Grantwriting Tips and Strategies. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING GROUNDWORK
Internet Archive Link
You spent a week writing the perfect grant proposal and waited patiently by the mailbox for the grant maker's response, wondering how long it would take them to cut the check. But instead of a check, you got a "We're sorry . . ." letter that left you scratching your head and wondering whether you should cancel your project altogether. Good news! Your project is probably not the problem. But the bad news is that you didn't do your grant writing groundwork, the upfront questions that need to be answered before your proposal ever gets near the mailbox. Article by Timothy Morral, Nonprofit Leader, August. 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING HELP BOOK : EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES, TIPS, AND RESOURCES FOR JUVENILE JUSTICE PROFESSIONALS
http://www.ncdjjdp.org/resources/pdf_documents/grant_writing_handbook.pdf
“There’s not enough time to write this grant.” “It’s too in-depth!” “It asks for too much research!” “We can’t spare the staff to write it!” These are all commonly heard in the hallways when it comes to writing a grant. Whether its due in several months or in a matter of days, there never seems to be enough time or resources. One way to keep you and your organization from being caught in this bind is to be prepared. Many grant applications asks for similar information The Grant Writing Process outlines these steps and provides some tips and guidelines on how to improve your next proposal. These steps are: Planning and First Steps, Executive Summary/Abstract, Goals and Objectives, Project Operation, Evaluation, Sustainability, and Budget. Courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING HINTS
Internet Archive Link
Writing grants is a daunting process for most small or moderately sized non-profit organizations. Often, grant writing falls to already overburdened staff, as few organizations of this size have the resources available to hire a full or part-time grant writer. The following suggestions are designed to help make this process easier. Provided by Volunteers in Health Care, October 1999. First of three articles. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTWRITING : PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 002
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/grantwriting-program-development-002/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-10-06
Program Development, or Program Planning, is an important first step in grantwriting. When the Program is developed, well thought-out -- with goals, objectives and outcomes – the grant application or grant proposal becomes much easier to write. Courtesy of Carol Geisbauer Grantwriting.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING TIPS
http://ruralhealth.und.edu/projects/flex/pdf/grantwriting_tips.pdf
Courtesy of the University of North Dakota, Center for Rural Health.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING TOOLKIT : NEEDS ASSESSMENT
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/grant-writing-toolkit-needs-statement/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-10-06
How to guide on writing a need statement for grant proposals. Courtesy of Center for Nonprofit Excellence, United Way of Central New Mexico.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANT WRITING TOOLKIT : PROGRAM PLAN
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/grant-writing-toolkit-program-plan/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-10-06
A how to guide to write a program plan for a grant proposal. Courtesy of Center for Nonprofit Excellence, United Way of Central New Mexico.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS AND FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE
http://www.feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/grants-and-federal-domestic-assistance
Information Web page, prepared by the Congressional Research Service, which gives guidance and Internet resources on Federal grants and nonfinancial assistance, as well as on private foundation funding. Provided by Senator Diane Feinstein.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS AND FOUNDATION SUPPORT:
SELECTED SOURCES OF INFORMATION ON GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE FUNDING

http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/bitstreams/428.pdf
Congressional offices receive numerous requests for information on how to obtain funds. Many worthwhile projects can only be carried out with outside assistance. This Congressional Research Service bibliography is intended to help planners learn about assistance programs and sources of funds. Of the many good guides to grants and foundation support, those listed in this report have been selected as representative of the variety of resources available. Courtesy of Rita Tehan, Congressional Reference Division, Library of Congress, January 8, 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS & LOANS : A GUIDE TO MUNICIPAL FINANCING FOR MICHIGAN COMMUNITIES
http://www.preinnewhof.com/grants-and-loans/
Looking for funding options? Request a copy of Prein & Newhof's annual Grants & Loans Guide by emailing info@preinnewhof.com. The Guide includes: (1) Facts and contact information for more than 25 funding programs; (2) Grant-winning tips; (3) Examples of creatively-funded projects; (4) An extensive list of print and online funding resources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT:
A PROFESSIONAL'S POINT OF VIEW
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice from Grantwriters.Com Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS GLOSSARY
http://www.azgrants.com/glossary/glossary.cfm#14
Provides definitions for grants terms. Courtesy of JustGrants!
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS READINESS : THE cULTURE AND PRACTICES OF SUCCESSFUL GRANTSEEKING
http://www.grantwriters.org/assets/documents/grant_readiness_checklist.pdf
What does it mean to be a "grants-ready" organization? An excellent checklist.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS TO INDIVIDUALS : INVESTING IN PEOPLE AND THEIR COMMUNITIES
http://www.grantcraft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewpage&pageid=1015
Aiming to have a broad effect on organizations or communities, some grant makers choose to fund individuals. It’s true that grants to individuals make special demands on foundations, both legally and administratively, but sometimes they’re the only way to achieve an important objective. In this guide, grant makers talk about the rigors and rewards of investing in people. Learn how to design and manage a grants-to-individuals program, including developing a theory of change, using the right funding mechanism, and finding the right people to support.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTS WORK IN A CONGRESSIONAL OFFICE
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL34035_20070604.pdf
Members of Congress frequently receive requests from constituents for information and assistance in obtaining funds for projects. Many state and local governments, nonprofit social service and community action organizations, private research groups, small businesses, and individuals approach congressional offices for information on funding, both from the federal government and from the private sector. The following report does not constitute a blueprint for every office involved in grants and projects activity, nor does it present in-depth information about all aspects of staff activity in this area. The discussion is aimed at describing some basics about the grants process and some of the approaches and techniques used by congressional offices in dealing with this type of constituent service. A guide prepared by Merete Gerli of the Library of Congress Congressional Research Service, Updated June 4, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GRANTWRITING, see Grant Writing

GREAT LAKES SCRIP CENTER
http://www.glscrip.com/
Scrip is a term that means "substitute money". When you purchase scrip, you're purchasing negotiable gift certificates and prepaid cards that are used just like cash You can use scrip to purchase everyday expenses like food, clothing, and other essentials, and with every purchase, you earn revenue for the church, school, or nonprofit organization of your choice.
The reason for the effectiveness of scrip is simple: families generate revenue through purchases they would make anyway. Groceries, clothing, toys, gifts, even gasoline can be purchased with scrip. An organization of 150 families easily spends between one and two million dollars per year on food, clothing and other essentials. If these families use scrip for these purchases, they can raise as much as $40,000 to $80,000 per year for their organization --without spending an additional penny.
(Last checked 03/07/05)

GUIDE FOR WRITING A FUNDING PROPOSAL
http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/
A practical guide that provides both instructions on how to write a funding proposal with actual examples of a completed proposal. Designed as a tool for advanced graduate students and others to learn more about the actual proposal writing process. Provided by S. Joseph Levine, MSU Department of Agricultural and Extension Education.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO FISCAL SPONSORSHIP
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/fiscal/index.html
Since most foundation funding is awarded to nonprofits rather than to individuals, affiliating yourself with an organization or obtaining a fiscal sponsor can increase your likelihood of receiving funding. Most such affiliations with fiscal sponsors are rather formal, based on a written contract that spells out who will do what, and some sponsors will extract a fee for this service. This guide is a detailed look at the affiliation possibilities for individual grantseekers.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO GETTING ARTS GRANTS (BOOK)
http://magic.msu.edu/record=b5237093a
New York : Allworth Press, c2006. 261pp.
This expert guide, written by an insider who has been on both the grant-making and the grant-writing side of the arts, shows readers how to assess their personal strengths and set goals to achieve optimal results: money to make art. Hands-on-examples are provided for every situation: from creating artists' statements to writing letters, fellowship applications, and arts-organization applications, to being ready for that all-important site visit. Online resources, tips on portfolio and personal prep, and information about the inner workings of boards and how to handle the yes, the no, and the maybe, make this ultimate, complete guide to getting that arts grant.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING
Internet Archive Link
Prepared by the staff of the Library Development Bureau, New Jersey State Library, affiliated with Thomas Edison State College, September, 1996. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO GRANTSEEKING ON THE WEB
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/onlinebooks/grantseek/text.html
The Foundation Center has posted an abridged version of The Foundation Center's Guide to Grantseeking on the Web, 2001 edition, in its Learning Lab, including excerpts from four chapters of the book: "Independent Foundations on the Web," "Corporate Giving on the Web," "Online Prospecting for Individual Donors," and "Building Communities: Discussion Groups, Listservs, Forums, and Message Boards." You can also test yourself on what you've learned by taking our online quiz. A print copy of the book should be available in the Funding Center collection in Main Library Reference.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO PROPOSAL PLANNING AND WRITING
http://www.oema.us/files/Gude_to_Grant_Writing.pdf
Offers time-tested suggestions on how you can plan and write your grant proposals so that you can get your share of grant dollars, as well as useful questions to ask a program officer. Lynn E. Miner, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Marquette University, and author of Proposal Planning and Writing (Oryx Press, 1998).
(Last checked 07/31/14)

GUIDE TO SPECIAL EVENTS FUNDRAISING
http://www.nald.ca/fulltext/heritage/compartne/specev1.htm
The entire text of this 21 chapter book by Ken Wyman, CFRE, a fund raising consultant in Canada. Courtesy of the Canadian Heritage Association.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HABITS OF THE FEARLESS GRANTSEEKER
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice from Larissa Golden Brown, a consultant from Portland, Oregon. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HAPPILY EVER AFTER -- CREATING LASTING RELATIONSHIPS WITH FUNDERS
Internet Archive Link
Ever go to a conference attended by both grantseekers and grantmakers? Foundation staff are often mobbed like celebrities. It’s not exactly the best place to get to know a program officer. The mail is no easier -- foundation mailboxes overflow with grantseekers’ newsletters, annual reports, and event invitations. So how can you truly stand out from the crowd and develop a meaningful relationship with a funder? Advice from Susan Schaefer, CFRE, Grant and Foundations Review, June 18, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HARD DATA/SOFT DATA: HOW THEY HELP YOU BUILD STRONG PROPOSALS
Internet Archive Link
https://www.tgci.com/sites/default/files/pdf/Hard%20Data_0.pdf
Article by Norton Kiritz from the Winter 1997 issue of Grantsmanship Center Magazine. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HELPING GRANTEES FIND NEW FUNDING
http://www.grantcraft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageID=1011
Also called "The Effective Exit : Managing the End of a Funding Relationship"
“Fundraising is a skill,” said one grant maker, “and some of us are better at it than others. But helping grantees find new money is part of the job, one way or another. And it can be learned.” Courtesy of GrantCraft.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HIRING A DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/96/fundraising.html
As small organizations grow, they grapple with the need to raise more and more money. Inevitably, they must consider hiring someone to take charge of fundraising. This is a difficult decision. A group is gambling that the investment of salary – money they often barely have – will generate much more money than they currently raise. And it will, if the person is effective, the board already accepts its role in fundraising, and the organization has its basic infrastructure in place (up-to-date records, clear goals and objectives). However, there is little margin for error. What if the person isn't skilled enough, or isn't a good worker? What if everything is in place, but the program takes longer than planned? How will the organization support itself in the meantime? Before deciding to hire fundraising staff, an organization should clarify a few issues. An article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 96, Nov./Dec. 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOME SIMPSON FOR NONPROFITS : THE TRUTH ABOUT HOW PEOPLE REALLY THINK AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR PROMOTING YOUR CAUSE
http://www.fundraising123.org/files/Homer_Simpson_for_Nonprofits_v2.pdf
Katya Andresen, Alia McKee, and Mark Rovner. Network for Good and Sea Change Strategies, 2010.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOSTING AN ANNUAL DINNER
http://www.dem.ri.gov/programs/bpoladm/suswshed/pdfs/swgtm.pdf
Article by Jeff Skelding in River Voices, Vol. 8, No. 4, Winter 1998.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS CAN WORK EFFECTIVELY WITH BUSINESS, PART ONE
Internet Archive Link
Businesses present a great, largely untapped, source of support and partnership for environmental organizations. This document discusses the benefits of working with businesses, what nonprofit environmental organizations can offer to businesses, and how to get started in building relationships with businesses. John Sterling, former Director of Environmental Programs at Patagonia, Inc. Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue II. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS CAN WORK EFFECTIVELY WITH BUSINESS, PART TWO
Internet Archive Link
Once a group identifies likely business partners and determines which component of the group’s work might interest the companies, the following tips may help to bring those relationships to fruition. John Sterling, former Director of Environmental Programs at Patagonia, Inc. Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue III. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW I BUILT AN AWARD WINNING STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM
http://www.plannedlegacy.com/newsletter/award-winning-stewardship-program.html
Article by Kathy Ruvolo, Executive Director of Constituent Relations, University of California, Irvine, Reprinted by PlannedGiving courtesy of Association of Donor Relations Professionals.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW NOT TO GET A GRANT
http://blog.seliger.com/2010/03/07/how-not-to-get-a-grant/#more-569
A list of strategic errors. Courtesy of Seliger Associates.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW STAFF CAN HELP YOU RAISE MONEY
Internet Archive Link
Eschew that Lone Ranger mentality. Better yet, help everyone else eschew, too! You’re not the only one responsible for helping the institution raise money. Though the rest of the staff may dodge the fundraising bullet in their job descriptions, they can’t escape it in their job responsibilities. You have to show them, though, how they can help the proposal developer earn grants. Advice from Sarah Brophy, Grants and Foundations Review, Oct. 22, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO ALIENATE A FOUNDATION OFFICIAL
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/cfrnet3.htm
A sample CFRNET mailing list posting, February 6, 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO APPLY TO THE IRS FOR CHARITY CERTIFICATION
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/irscert.htm
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO ASK FOR MONEY - WHETTING THEIR APPETITE
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/whetting.htm
Practical advice from the former Grantseeker.Com Learning Center Home Page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO BE A GRANT WRITER
http://www.powerhomebiz.com/vol121/grantwriter.htm
Grant writing is a wholly creative and satisfying career. The main task is to write and develop grant proposals. This entails consulting, utilizing needs assessments, and brainstorming workable solutions, as well as cultivating goals and objectives. Article by Jenny Fulbright, PowerHomebiz.com Staff Writer.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO CHOOSE FUNDRAISING COUNSEL
http://web.archive.org/web/20120313082524/http://www.aafrc.org/counsel/index.cfm
A guide provided by American Association of Fund Raising Counsel and the AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, now called the Giving Institute. Also listed as Eight steps....
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO CONDUCT SPECIAL EVENTS
Internet Archive Link
Special events, also often called “fundraising benefits,” are social gatherings of many sorts that expand the reputation of the organization, give those attending an amusing, interesting, or moving time, and possibly make money for the organization sponsoring the event. The variety of special events is practically limitless, as are the possibilities for money earned or lost, amount of work put in, number of people participating, and so on. Reprinted from Fundraising for Social Change by Kim Klein, Third Edition, copyright Chardon Press, 1996. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO COPE WITH FUNDING CUTBACKS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/126/fundraising.html
Strategies to get your organization through the dry spell. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Onlice, Number 126, Nov./Dec. 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO DEVELOP AND WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL32159_20090609.pdf
This report is intended for grant seekers in districts and states. It is based in poart on "Developing and Writing Grant Proposals" from the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance and draws on some other CRS reports such as Grant Proposal Devlopment (90-430) by Rhoda Newman. The CFDA tends to focus on federal grant proposals; this report has been expanded to include writing proposals for both government and private foundation grants. In preparation for writing a proposal, the report first discusses preliminary information gathering and information, developing ideas for the proposal, gathering community support, identifying funding resources, and seeking preliminary review of the proposal and support of relevant administrative officials.
The second section covers the actual writing of the proposal, from outlining of project goals, stating the purpose and objectives of the proposal, explaining the program methods to solve the stated problem, and how the results of the project will be evaluated, to long-term project planning, and, finally, developing the budget proposal.
The last section includes a listing of free grants writing Web sites, some in Spanish as well as in English, including the Foundation Center's Proposal Writing Short Course.
Merete F. Gerli, Congressional Research Service, June 9, 2009.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO FIND SOURCES OF MAJOR FUNDING
Internet Archive Link
Advice from Aaron K. Shaffer. Courtesy of VFIS, a division of the Glatfelter Insurance Group. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO GET YOUR BOARD TO RAISE MONEY - PLAN X
Internet Archive Link
An article by Kim Klein reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 19, Number 2, © Chardon Press, 2000. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO HOLD GREAT FUNDRAISING EVENTS : A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
http://thefundraisingauthority.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/Hold-Great-Events.pdf
Advice from the Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO PROVE TO A FOUNDATION THAT A GRANT PRODUCED RESULTS
http://philanthropy.com/news/prospecting/index.php?id=4988
When charities ask foundations to renew their grants, they can’t show only that a program was instituted as promised or that it served a certain number of people, says John A. LaRocca, vice president of the Rensselaerville Institute, a think tank for charities and foundations. Charities need to show that participants in a particular program have grown or changed as a result of it, Mr. LaRocca said a conference for fund raisers held in New York last week. “We look for a relatively enduring change in behavior,” he said. Article by Elizabeth Schwinn, Chronicle of Philanthropy, June 18, 2008.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO RECRUIT YOUR VOLUNTEER FUNDRAISING TEAM USING YOUR BOARD
https://web.archive.org/web/20101221231651/http://www.raise-funds.com/999forum.html
If you run a non-profit, you most likely do fundraising of some nature. This article breaks down how to organize a capital campaign from who you need and what you need them to do. A must read for any agency fundraising on a large scale. By Tony Poderis. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO RUN A SUCCESSFUL CARWASH FUNDRAISER
http://www.carwashguys.com/fundraisers/LAschools.html
This book, by the Car Wash Guys, was compiled after 1,000 car wash fundraisers were done. These are tips to help non-profit organizations raise money, using very little water and without allowing water to enter a storm drain.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO START AN ENDOWMENT FOR YOUR NONPROFIT
http://nonprofit.about.com/business/industries/nonprofit/library/weekly/aa082698.htm
An online article from the About.Com Guide to Nonprofit Charitable Organizations, written by Joanne Fritz. Includes web links to additional resources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO USE A FREELANCE WRITER
Internet Archive Link
My first job in fundraising was with a very large university. The development office employed three grant proposal writers and an editor. Later on, I worked as a freelance grant proposal writer for 18 years, and I was pleased to discover that many non-profits did not employ in-house writers. These organizations relied upon freelance writers to get out their proposals, newsletters, brochures, etc. Advice from Shelley Uva, Grants and Foundations Review, Oct. 28, 2002. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE A FEDERAL GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.federalgrantswire.com/writing-a-federal-grant-proposal.html
A successful grant proposal is one that is well-prepared, thoughtfully planned, and concisely packaged. The potential applicant should become familiar with all of the pertinent program criteria related to the Catalog program from which assistance is sought. Refer to the information contact person listed in the Catalog program description before developing a proposal to obtain information such as whether funding is available, when applicable deadlines occur, and the process used by the grantor agency for accepting applications. Applicants should remember that the basic requirements, application forms, information and procedures vary with the Federal agency making the grant award. Advice from FederalGrantsWire.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://nonprofit.about.com/od/fundraising/ht/proposals.htm
Most grantmaking organizations have their own proposal/application forms although a few may only give you some basic guidelines. In any case, here are the most common sections of a grant proposal and the information you should include.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.youthdevelopment.org/pdf/howtowrite.pdf
This document was extracted from the Federal Grants Manual for Youth Programs : A Guide to Youth Risk Behavior Prevention Funding, Volume 1 (DHHS) by the Institute for Youth Development. 12pp.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL : EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO CREATE A WINNING PROPOSAL
http://web.archive.org/web/20061220211320/http://policegrants.com/pdf/Writing_A_Winning_Grant_Pro.pdf
Cover title Lesko's 10-Step program for Writing a Winning Grant Proposal. Matthew Lesko and Sarah Priestman. 1st edition, 2003. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE A SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING PLAN
http://www.thefundraisingauthority.com/fundraising-basics/fundraising-plan/
Article by Joe Garecht from the Fundraising Authority.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW TO WRITE AN OUTREACH GRANT PROPOSAL
http://chronicle.com/article/How-to-Write-an-Outreach-Gr/46879/
Plenty of advice is available for scientists seeking research grants. But what if you are looking for money to create an after-school science program or a training session for nurses who work with an increasingly elderly population? Article by Karen M. Markin, Chronicle of Higher Education, September 15, 2006.
(Last checked 05/02/07)

HOW WE RAISED MONEY IN A HURRY
Internet Archive Link
I recently discovered that, when confronted with a formidable fundraising challenge, it’s wise to consult the experts, craft a feasible plan, and perhaps most important, trust your instincts. With virtually no experience in securing gifts from major donors, and with the help of many talented and resourceful people, I was able to lead our group in raising $1.5 million from middle-income donors, most of it in just five months. This article focuses on how we accomplished that feat—what worked, what didn’t—and the important lessons that we learned. An article by Mary Humphries reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 18, Number 6, © Chardon Press, 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

HOW YOU CAN DESIGN AND DEVELOP COST-EFFECTIVE MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Internet Archive Link
Expertly managed public relations programs utilize a wide variety of communications, each suited to the target audience. This article discusses how to evaluate your current marketing communications (excluding response rates). As well, we will help you to identify some low-cost alternative communications to augment your “marketing mix.” Diane L. Hodiak, co-author of Fund-Raising and Marketing in the One-Person Shop, Achieving Success with Limited Resources. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

I'M WAITING...
Internet Archive Link
The proposal deadlines stack up ahead of you, but no one is ready to give or get you what you need. You have had the team meetings, designed the projects and made the connections, now you're just waiting for the physical material you need to write the proposal. Something as simple as "John, this is worth $75,000!" will move things along. Too often, though, our colleagues fall prey to smaller, more immediate issues. Source: Grants and Foundations Review, January 21, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

IDEALIST.ORG RESOURCES FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.idealist.org/info/Nonprofits/Npofaq
Provides the answers to frequently asked questions by nonprofits. Questions and answers are sorted into various categories such as : organization, regulation, development, management, and resources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

IDEAS FOR YOUTH ORGANIZATION FUNDRAISING EVENTS
Internet Archive Link
This list was prepared for use by middle school, high school, and college student organizations. Some of the events may be appropriate for intermediate grades student organizations as well (especially with adult/family help). Many of these projects are also suitable for parent groups, grassroots prevention organizations, youth-serving agencies, and school-based prevention programs. The activities listed below are popular activities for youth prevention organizations such as BACCHUS, SADD, STAND, Youth Power, etc. Article provided by William J. Bailey, M.P.H., C.P.P., Associate Professor of Applied Health Science and Executive Director, Indiana Prevention Resource Center, Indiana University. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

IMPORTANCE OF GRANT REPORTING
Internet Archive Link
As a grant writer, your first priority is writing proposals that get your organization grants. Once you have received a grant, you may feel pretty good about yourself, but it's important to remember that your work is not yet done. Almost all funders ask their grant recipients to submit reports on the funding they have provided, and chances are, writing these reports is going to be part of your job. Article by Shelley Uva, Grants and Foundations Review, Jan 30, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INCREASED GIVING BY INVESTING MORE MONEY IN FUND RAISING -- WISELY
http://nccsdataweb.urban.org/PubApps/levis/increased.html
This article by Wilson C. Lewis was originally presented as a paper at the Third Annual Symposium, "Taking Fund Raising Seriously," at the Center on Philanthropy, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, June 6-8, 1990. It was published in The Philanthropic Monthly, April/May, 1990.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INFORMATION FOR SEEKING FOUNDATION AND CORPORATE GRANTS, 2007
https://www.michiganfoundations.org/resources/information-seeking-foundation-corporate-grants
Contents: How to research a foundation. The proposal process. Typical questions a foundation might ask. Michigan Common Grant Application Form. Where to get more information. Courtesy of the Council of Michigan Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INNER SECRETS OF SUCCESSFUL PROPOSALS
Internet Archive Link
Top tips on getting your proposal through, straight from the people who know best what works: funders. An article by Linda A. Long, freelance writer, appearing in Foundation News and Commentary, March/April 2000, and still available thanks to the Fannie Mae Foundation. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INTRODUCTION TO FUND RAISING
http://www.tparents.org/Library/Unification/Talks/Froehlch/FUNDRSE.htm
Presentation by Tom Froehlich compiled from required reading sources and class notes for the Development Director Certificate Program at the College of Professional Studies, University of San Francisco.
. (Last checked 07/31/14)

INTRODUCTION TO FUNDRAISING PLANNING : TAKING STOCK OF YOUR STRENGTHS
http://www.aids-alliance.org/education/webinars/4-12-11-intro-to-fundraising-planning-resource-packet.pdf
A compilation of resources, including: (1) An Assets Inventory, (2) Creating a Case Statement : A starting point for any conversation with potential donors, (3) Selecting prospective funding partners, (4) Identifying institutional funding partners, (5) Setting goals for institutional support, (6) Building a fundraising team, and (7) Resource list for further reading.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

AN INTRODUCTION TO GRANT REPORTS : TIPS AND TOOLS FOR PREPARING REPORTS FOR YOUR FUNDERS
https://web.archive.org/web/20071210085711/http://www.techsoup.org/learningcenter/funding/page7036.cfm
The grant proposal you spent weeks writing has finally paid off, securing much-needed funds for your nonprofit's latest project. Yet even though you have acquired the grant, your obligation to your funders isn't over. Once your organization accepts a funder's money, you also accept the responsibility of preparing and submitting a grant report to them, letting the funder how you spent their money and what sort of impact your program or project has had. Advice from Brian Satterfield, TechSoup, May 15, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INTRODUCTION TO GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING (PART I): STRATEGIES AND WRITING TIPS [Episode 22]
http://socialworkpodcast.com/2007/08/introduction-to-grant-proposal-writing.html
Questions to ask before writing your proposal:
(1) Is this project one in which the author and his/her agency has sufficient interest to pursue to the finish?
(2) If funded, will the staff be able to handle this new project with their other work?
(3) Is the author sufficiently skilled to plan, organize, direct, coordinate, control and evaluate the project? (Keep in mind here that when I say author, I am assuming the author will become the project director, though sometimes proposals are written for hire by proposal writers not expected to be involved in the project if the proposal is funded.)
(4) Are the project goals and objectives sufficiently congruent with those of the parent organization?
(5) Will the parent organization back the project with administrative and other supports?
(6) Are adequate facilities, equipment release time, etc. available?
(7) What risks to the author and organization are there and are these reasonable?
(8) Questions to ask about your finished proposal:
(8a) Who are you and what qualifies you to present this proposal?
(8b) What is the problem you seek to address?
(8c) Have you identified the need?
(8d) What do you propose to do about that problem?
(8e) How exactly will you go about this and what exactly will you deliver?
(8f) How much will it cost?
(8g) How will you know if you have accomplished your goals and objectives?
(8h) What objective evidence is there of the nature, purpose and capacity of you and your organization and what do other qualified parties think of your idea, your approach to addressing it and your organization?
J. B. Singer (host) interviews Dr. Edward Sites via Social Work Podcast. August 13, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

INTRODUCTION TO GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING (PART II): THE NARRATIVE, BUDGET, AND APPENDICES [Episode 23]
http://www.socialworkpodcast.com/GrantWriting2-64.mp3
Today's interview with Dr. Edward Sites is the second in a two-part series on grant writing. In today's episode, I talk with Dr. Sites about the three sections most commonly found in grant applications - the narrative, the budget and the appendices. J. B. Singer (host) interviews Dr. Edward Sites via Social Work Podcast. August 21, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

IT'S NOT WHO YOU KNOW: IT'S HOW YOU ASK
Internet Archive Link
Introducing a five-step process for winning major gift donors. Outline of a presentation at the 1999 NSFRE Indiana Fundraising Day, September 24, 1999, by Edith H. Falk, President.Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

JUST ANSWER THE QUESTIONS AND OTHER TIPS FOR AN AWARD-WINNING PROPOSAL
Internet Archive Link
Truth be told, our President/CEO really likes to win awards. My first tasks when I arrived two years ago were to submit our organization for three local honors. I didn't know how much to brag, how much to bluster and how much to try to overwhelm the judges with facts and figures. We did okay, winning finalist designations on all three submission, but no prize. An article by Bill Smith, Corporate & Foundation Relations Manager, Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, Grants and Foundations Review, April 7, 2004. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

JUST GRANTS ARIZONA : Grantsmanship News and Article
http://www.azgrants.com/articles/articles.cfm
A compilation of articles from Just Grants Arizona.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

KEEP IT SPECIAL : USING SPECIAL EVENTS TO BEST ADVANTAGE
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/122/fundraising.html
Special events or fundraising benefits expand the reputation of an organization, provide participants an interesting time, and sometimes make money. Because of their variety and flexibility, special events are excellent strategies for acquiring, retaining, or upgrading donors. Organizations serious about building a broad base of individual donors need at least one or two events annually – to generate publicity, raise their visibility, and bring in new money. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 122, March/April 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

KICKSTARTER A NEWWAY TO FUND AND FOLLOW CREATIVITY
http://www.kickstarter.com
Kickstarter is a new form of commerce and patronage, not a place for investment or lending. Project creators inspire people to open their wallets by offering products, benefits and fun experiences. Our fee is 5%. Kickstarter collects 5% from the project creator if a project is successfully funded.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LAW ENFORCEMENT GRANTS : GUIDE TO OBTAINING LAW ENFORMCEMENT GRANTS
http://www.njlawman.com/Grants.htm
As the competition for obtaining law enforcement grants has increased during recent years, the available grant monies have decreased. Grants for police departments have been slowly become homeland security grants. This page is designed to be a resource for the law enforcement grant researcher and grant writer. We have assembled information on different methods for obtaining police and law enforcement grants as well as different sources of grant money. Courtesy of New Jersey Lawman.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LESKO'S 10-STEP PROGRAM FOR WRITING A WINNING GRANT PROPOSAL
http://web.archive.org/web/20061220211320/http://policegrants.com/pdf/Writing_A_Winning_Grant_Pro.pdf
Inside cover title How to Write a Grant Proposal : Everything You Need to Create a Winning Proposal. Matthew Lesko and Sarah Priestman. 1st edition, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LET'S ASK FOR ONE MILLION DOLLARS OR WHY SUCCESSFUL GRANTSMANSHIP ISN'T LIKE BUCKSHOT
Internet Archive Link
The importance of prospect research. Practical advice by Katherine Driskell Felts, KDFConsulting, Grants and Foundation Review, Apr 8, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LETTER PROPOSALS
http://grantspace.org/Tools/sample-documents/%28sample_doc_cat_id%29/2/%28sample_doc_cat_name%29/Letter+Proposals
Advice from the Foundation Center Portal : GrantSpace.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LIBRARY FUND RAISING: A SELECTED ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=Library_Fact_Sheets&
Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=25081

In recent years, many librarians have turned to nontraditional sources of funding to ensure that their library or library system will be able to provide necessary services with a high degree of excellence. This fact sheet is designed to serve a variety of interests. Whether you are looking to fund a large, one-time project or to form lasting connections with the community at large that will generate future dividends, these sources will be valuable tools. ALA Library Fact Sheet Number 24. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LIBRARY FUNDRAISING ON THE WEB
Internet Archive Link
A 1998 update of an article appearing in the ALA 1996 Big Book of Library Grant Money by Adam Corson-Finnerty, Director, Library Development and External Affairs, University of Pennsylvania Library.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A LIBRARY'S APPEAL: NOT BY THE BOOK
http://www.pps.org/a-librarys-appeal-affinity-groups-as-a-new-means-of-fund-raising/
Advice from Anne Lowry Bailey about using affinity groups to raise money for libraries. From Urban Parks Online Fundraising Strategies web page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LOGIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
SEE W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION LOGIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

LOOKING AT THE BIG PICTURE:
THE 5 KEY INGREDIENTS OF SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING
http://www.envision.ca/templates/resources.asp?id=2669
To fundraise effectively, an organization needs an effective fundraising plan. A concise plan will help an organization reach new donors. Objectives for increasing donors must be clearly outlined and planning needs to incorporate strong volunteer leadership, timelines, communications, and more. The 5 key ingredients to successful fundraising are:
(1) Knowing what motivates individuals/groups to donate,
(2) Knowing your project,
(3) Being aware of potential sources of funding,
(4) Developing a strategy,
(5) Being familiar with your organization and its resources.
Courtesy of Envision.ca Virtual Resource Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

LOOKING FOR GRANTS?
http://www.cof.org/index.cfm?containerID=76&menuContainerID=0&crumb=2&
A list of information resources provided by the Council of Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAINTAINING HEART IN A WIRED WORLD
http://www.venturesfoundation.org/pubs/other/MaintainingHeart.pdf
The appropriate uses of technology in Community Foundations - October 2002, "Is it possible that technology can actually help Community Foundations build better relationships and improve the quality of its grantmaking?" by Noah Wasmer, Chief Knowledge Management Officer, East Bay Communrity Foundation. Shared by Philanthropic Ventures Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAJOR DONOR COMPAIGNS: THE HEART OF ANY SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/mdcampaign.htm
Whether for capital or annual gifts, major donor campaigns are an extremely effective means of raising significant income. Make a major donor campaign part of your nonprofit's fundraising arsenal; it will be well worth the investment of time and money.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAJOR DONOR CAMPAIGNS: THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING
Internet Archive Link
This article focuses on: What is a major donor? Why are major donors so important to nonprofits? How do you find them? Tips from Zimmerman, Lehman, a San Francisco consulting firm. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAKE FUNDRAISING YOUR CAREER
Internet Archive Link
What would you say if you could have a career that paid you a salary from $10,000-$150,000? Gave you work with fairly measurable outcomes? Where talking about your values and writing about what you believe is part of the job? Where all the people you work with agree that what you do is really important? Sounds like a great career, doesn't it? It is: it's a career in fundraising. An article by Kim Klein reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 17, Number 1, copyright Chardon Press, 1998. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAKING SPORTS WORK FOR YOU
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/making.htm
How to leverage sports teams & players to help your cause. Maria Hibbard, AHCConsulting.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAKING THE CALL
Internet Archive Link
A critical piece of proposal writing isn't writing at all, it's talking. If you haven't called to speak to a foundation officer or program director before preparing a proposal, you risk wasting your time writing it and someone's time reading it. Advice from Sarah S. Brophy, Grants and Foundations Review, April 2, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAKING THE CASE FOR SUPPORT
Internet Archive Link
Learn how to "tell your story" with donor-focused strategies for speaking to your prospect audiences. A presentation by Kenneth W. Johnson, Vice President & Regional Manager, to the NSFRE Greater Cleveland Chapter, NSFRE, March 24, 1998. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MAKING USE OF DECEMBER
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/119/fundraising.html
December is a great month to raise money. In this way, it is strikingly similar to the other 11 months. And some people do make most of their donations in December. Some very wealthy people wait to see which stocks they should donate to get the best tax advantage, and self-employed people whose monthly income varies widely may wait until year’s end to get a clear sense of their financial picture. However, for every person who waits until the holidays to make major giving decisions, a hundred more have already given away all they are going to give. Very few people make all their charitable gifts in any one time period. And December is in fact a very competitive month during which to raise money, particularly among social service agencies, as the needs of the poor, homeless, and hungry tend to be highlighted at this time of year. From the other direction, the gift-buying frenzy also competes for attention and money. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 119, Sept./Oct. 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MANAGING MULTIPLE GRANT PRIORITIES
Internet Archive Link
Grant writers by necessity must be able to keep a number of different balls in the air at once or risk ineffectiveness. Operating grants. Program grants. Construction projects. Equipment needs. And on and on and on. Whether you are a paid staffer at a single organization or you freelance for a variety of non-profits, you must be able to manage a diverse portfolio of grant projects. Practical advice from karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, August 12, 2003. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MANAGING UNREASONABLE EXPECTATIONS CONCERNING YOUR GRANTS PROGRAM
Internet Archive Link
If you have been a grant writer for more than a week you have probably already encountered your share of unreasonable expectations: supervisors who think you can write fourteen winning grants at the same time; faculty members or other co-workers who think you can secure funds for their pet projects without any more detail than "get us as much as you can for whatever you can get it for." Advice from Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, October 9, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A MAP OF THE CRAFT
https://web.archive.org/web/20140109144704/http://www.grantcraft.org/pdfs/mapofthecraft.pdf
What do grant makers say they need to get beyond the basics? We asked hundreds of grant makers this question and charted their answers. This Map of the Craft [PDF - 4 pages] identifies seven challenges in grant making, as well as practices and skills that can help you meet them. Courtesy of Grantcraft. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 12/06/05)

MAXIMIZING PROGRAM SERVICES THROUGH PRIVATE SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS AND RELATIONSHIPS : A GUIDE FOR FAITH- AND COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE PROVIDERS
http://www.samhsa.gov/FBCI/docs/PartnerHandbook_feb2006.pdf
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. 2005.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MCKINSEY CAPACITY ASSESSMENT GRID
http://www.prolifica.org/uploads/capacity%20assessment.pdf
Shared by the Procifica Group.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MICHIGAN COMMON APPLICATION FORM
https://www.michiganfoundations.org/resources/common-grant-application-form
Many Michigan foundations have adopted a common application form for grant seekers to use when applying for funding. Courtesy of the Council of Michigan Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MICHIGAN NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION
Nonprofit Resource Center
http://www.mnaonline.org/nonprofitresourcecenter.aspx
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MIND THE GAP : BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS COMMUNITY NEEDS
Internet Archive Link
We all know that no single organization can meet all the needs of an individual and her or his family. No single organization can address all of the problems a community may face. By bringing organizations together in collaborative partnerships we may address many more needs – some unforeseen, some evolutionary – than we originally felt we could. In order for your organization to holistically serve individuals or families, you must be knowledgeable about available resources in your community, throughout the region, and across the state. Article by Cynthia M. Adams, CEO, GrantStation, for the Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume IV, Issue VI. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MULTICULTURAL PHILANTHROPY WEBOGRAPHY
Internet Archive Link
The Multicultural Philanthropy Webography is a project of the Center for the Study of Philanthropy at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. The Center maintains active links to the web sites of minority and ethnic nonprofit organizations in the following categories: African American, Latino, Women, Asian-Pacific-American, and Native American. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

MULTI-GENERATIONAL MARKETING FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.plannedlegacy.com/newsletter/fall2002/generationalmarketing.html
The greatest transfer of wealth in history will occur over the next 50 years. A portion of this wealth will find its way directly to non-profit organizations, but the remainder will be distributed among four of the five living generations. PlannedLegacy's Tribute builds relationships through interaction Organizations who understand the backgrounds, morals, values, characteristics, institutions, lifestyle preferences and priorities of each generation, and who can adjust their communication and marketing strategies accordingly, will reap the greatest benefit. Is your organization ready? The Five Living Generations :
(1) The G.I. Generation (born 1901-24)
(2) The Silent Generation (born 1925-42)
(3) The Baby Boomers (born 1943-60)
(4) Generation "X" (born 1961-81)
(5) The Millennials (born 1982-2000)
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE NEEDS STATEMENT
Internet Archive Link
The Needs Statement must convince a reviewer of need and invoke them to respond. The proposal must convey a sense of urgency and substantiate it with facts. The Needs Statement sets this tone. As a proposal writer, you must "give life" to the issue at hand. You must balance the math with the human condition. As a proposal writer, you can focus on several key strategies that support a quality Needs Statement. Advice from Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE, Grants and Foundations Review, Dec. 10, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATION FUND RAISING
https://web.archive.org/web/20130521080719/http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/rcpi/fundraising.pdf
Tip Sheet #2, December 2000. Courtesy of the Neighborhood Associations of Michigan.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE NEW CONTRACTING ECONOMY: WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR FUNDRAISING?
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/zimnot41.htm
Sample issue of ZimNotes, Vol. 4, No. 1
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NEW WAYS FOR NONPROFITS TO RAISE MONEY ONLINE
http://www.socialbrite.org/2010/06/28/new-ways-for-nonprofits-to-raise-money-online/
Mobile devices, SMS, social networks are options for online donations. Kemper Barkhurst on Socialbrite.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NINE BASIC TRUTHS ABOUT FUND RAISING
https://web.archive.org/web/20120703024231/http://www.raise-funds.com/1998/nine-basic-truths-of-fund-raising/
Some tips from Tony Poderis, a fund raiser and consultant located in Cleveland, Ohio.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NINE KEY ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL PROPOSALS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/nine.htm
Practical advice from the former Grantseeker.Com Learning Center Home Page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE NONPROFIT EMAIL MARKETING GUIDE Email : 7 STEPS TO BETTER EMAIL FUNDRAISING & COMMUNICATIONS
http://www.fundraising123.org/files/Nonprofit-Email-Marketing-Guide.pdf
Network for Good.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NONPROFIT FUNDRAISING AND GRANTWRITING
https://web.archive.org/web/20050914032337/http://www.managementhelp.org/fndrsng/np_raise/np_raise.htm
Practical advice compiled by Carter Mcmanara, the Management Assistance Program for Nonprofits, St. Paul, Minnesota. Categories of information include:
(1) Fundraising - Planning
(2) Grantwriting and Proposals
(3) Fundraising Plan (on-line development of plan)
(4) Registration of Fundraising Activities
(5) Fundraising On-Line
(6) Fundraising Software
(7) Hiring Fundraisers
(8) General Resources
(9) Assessing Your Fundraising Knowledge and Practices
Also provides: Miscellaneous Links, Related Library Links, On-Line Discussion Groups About Philanthropy, On-Line Newsletters About Nonprofits, and Hardcopy Resources
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NONPROFIT FUNDRAISING DEMYSTIFIED
http://www.raise-funds.com/2003/nonprofit-fund-raising-demystified/,br> Practical advice from Tony Poderis.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

NONPROFIT FUNDRAISING FOR ANIMAL PROTECTION ORGANIZATIONS
Internet Archive Link
Advice from AnimalFunding.org (The Fund for Animals). Includes sections on:
(1) Defining Your Organization
(2) Share Your Success Story!
(3) Getting Started in Fundraising
Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ONCE IS NOT ENOUGH
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/120/fundraising.html
As long as they are treated like whole people and not just cash machines, many donors do respond generously when asked for extra gifts. Studies have found that about 10 percent of donors will give each time they are asked, so any mailing you send should get a 10 percent response. But multiple appeals can have an even greater effect than that, because many people give to some appeals and not others. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 120, Nov./Dec. 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ONE PROGRAM OFFICER'S CANDID TIPS FOR GRANTSEEKERS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130205181529/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/One%20Program%20Officer%27s%20Candid%20Tips%20for%20Grantseekers.pdf
Article by Joel Orosz, The Grantsmanship Center Magazine, Summer 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE ONLINE FUNDRAISER'S CHECKLIST
http://www.fundraising123.org/files/Checklist%20eBook%205.16.11.pdf
Courtesy of Network for Good.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ONLINE FUNDRAISING HANDBOOK : MAKING THE MOST OF THE WEB AND EMAIL TO RAISE MORE MONEY ONLINE http://www.fundraising123.org/files/groundspring-handbook.pdf
A 92-page downloadable guide on raising funds online, making your web site more effective, mining for new donors and much more. GroundSpring.org. 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

(ONLINE) FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN IN A BOX : A PLANNING RESOURCE
http://www.fundraising123.org/files/FundraisingCampaigninaBox.pdf
Are you looking for a way to strategically grow your online donations? Need help planning and executing an online fundraising campaign? Introducing Campaign in a Box, a fundraising campaign planning guide from Network for Good and Firefly Partners. This guide features a 7-step process that will quickly lead you through the planning of a successful fundraising campaign.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ONLINE FUNDRAISING RESOURCE CENTER
http://www.fund-online.com/welcome.html
This collection of online fundraising resources is the work of Adam Corson-Finnerty and Laura Blanchard, authors of Fundraising and Friendraising on the Web: A Handbook for Libraries and Other Nonprofit Organizations (which is available in the MSU Libraries Main Library Stacks). The web site includes excerpts from the book, a series of essays on the changing online fund-raising scene ("musings"), and teaching materials from classes and presentations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

onPHILANTHROPY.com
http://www.onphilanthropy.com/
Featuring the popular e-newsletter "Observations on Philanthropy". Maintained by Sponsor Our World, Inc. Other sections include: Fundraising, Marketing, Current Issues, Government Relations, Corporate Giving, Foundations, and Technology/Media.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ORGANIZATIONAL AUDIT
Internet Archive Link
This interactive audit will help you assess the overall strengths and weaknesses of your organization. Courtesy of the Gill Foundation. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A PEDIATRICIAN'S GUIDE TO PROPOSAL WRITING
https://web.archive.org/web/20111208190357/http://aap.org/commpeds/resources/Pediatrician_Guide_to_Proposal_Writing.pdf
This Guide is a tool to help pediatricians develop grant proposals for community-based child health programs. It contains information on types of grantmarkers; proposal writing and the solicitation process; components of a proposal; common proposal writing mistakes; examples of proposals and budgets; and resources on fundraising and proposal writing.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PERPETUAL PRESCHOOL FUNDRAISING IDEAS
http://www.perpetualpreschool.com/fundideas.html
A collection of fundraising ideas for daycare facilities.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PHILANTHROPIC INTERNET: HOW TO RAISE FUNDS ONLINE
Internet Archive Link
Arts organizations currently use their websites to increase donations in a wide range of ways: from providing contact information for donations to online crediting of donors; from solicitation of online memberships to sponsor acknowledgment that verges on advertising. An online article by Andrew Schinder, National Endowment for the Arts. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PHILANTHROPIC STUDIES INDEX
http://cheever.ulib.iupui.edu/psipublicsearch/
The Philanthropic Studies Index (PSI), which indexes the growing body of articles written on topics and issues concerning the nonprofit sector, is compiled and produced by the Joseph and Matthew Payton Philanthropic Studies Library staff. PSI is published to serve as a resource for helping people study philanthropy.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PHILANTHROPY'S GREAT GRANTS ARCHIVES
http://www.cof.org/index.cfm?containerID=133&menuContainerID=0
The developments described here have touched the lives of nearly every American and yet not many Americans would readily make the connection that foundation grants helped make them happen. Because foundations serve as society’s research and development arm by funding programs that explore new problem-solving approaches much of value is learned from those foundation-funded experiments that don’t work out as well as the wide-impact successes described here. Courtesy of the Council of Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PLANNING A CAPITAL CAMPAIGN FOR GRASSROOTS GROUPS
Internet Archive Link
One of the most effective ways to raise big money is with a capital campaign.  But community-based groups often lack the resources and the know-how to undertake such an ambitious enterprise.  Grassroots fundraising expert Kim Klein shows how even smaller nonprofits can reap the benefits of a well-planned campaign. Courtesy of the Grantsmanship Center News, Fall 2001. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

POSITIONING GRANT WRITERS FOR SUCCESS
Also listed as Fund Raising Forum Library
http://www.raise-funds.com/2002/positioning-grant-writers-for-success/
Maintained by Tony Poderis, professional consultant, speaker, and author on development, this site offers scores of articles on fundraising, finding funding sources, organizing and managing campaigns, and creating development teams.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRACTICALLY PERFECT POINTS FOR A PESO PRODUCING PITCH
Internet Archive Link
Pitching can be petrifying. Face it, we are combining our two favorite activities: Public Speaking and Asking People for Money. Yeah, this will work. Our nervousness can lead to disaster. But as with other things that make our nerves wrack, we can produce success with proper planning and preparation. Visit this web site for 16 tips. Courtesy of the Gill Foundation. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PREPARING A GRANT PROPOSAL : FIVE STEPS IN THE PROPOSAL WRITING PROCESS
http://www.arc.gov/index.do?nodeId=102
(1) Agree on the Problem
(2) Describe What You Hope to Achieve
(3) Design Your Program
(4) Locate Funding Sources
(5) Write Your Proposal Courtesy of the Appalachian Regional Commission.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS -- PART III
Internet Archive Link
Many people are surprised to learn that foundations are not required to publish grant application-related materials for the public. In fact, the vast majority do not. Because only a tiny percentage of all foundations -- and even fewer of the smaller ones -- have websites, it is critical that grantseekers invest time in careful studies of the major directories of foundations. They should then follow up with calls directly to the grantmakers, requesting printed information or at least a verbal explanation of program priorities. Advice from Marilyn Gross, Foundations and Grants Review, February 26, 2002.< Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS -- PART II
Internet Archive Link
Last time we examined several common reasons that wealthy individuals or families have for creating charitable foundations. These original motivations can affect the foundation's day-to-day operations long after its formal creation. Advice from Marilyn Gross, Foundations and Grants Review, February 19, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS -- PART I
Internet Archive Link
When it comes to "dealing with" private foundations, many new grantseekers -- as well as people whose grantseeking has been limited to public (i.e., government) funding sources, often feel at sea. Advice from Marilyn Gross, Foundations and Grants Review, February 26, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRIVATE FUNDING FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE INITIATIVES: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE GRANTSEEKING PROCESS
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/jr000240.pdf
NIJ Journal, July 1999, No. 240 includes the article "Private Funding for Criminal Justice Initiatives" by Kate Chieco starting on page 20 which should be of interest to criminal justice fund raisers, particularly those who work for government agencies.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PRIVATE MONEY FOR GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
Internet Archive Link
Strapped municipalities in California search for new ways to pay for services. Article originally appearing in the Los Angeles Times by Jean Merl shared by the Grantsmanship Center News. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROFITS FOR NONPROFITS : EARNING YOUR OWN WAY
Internet Archive Link
Profit" need not be a dirty word at a nonprofit organization. In a discussion led by HBS professor James E. Austin, three experienced managers discuss the advantages and pitfalls of building a for-profit unit within a nonprofit. Article by Martha Laqace, Nonprofit Leader, May 2003. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROGRAM-RELATED INVESTING : SKILLS AND STRATEGIES FOR NEW PRI FUNDERS
http://www.grantcraft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageID=821
Program-related investments are loans and equity investments that foundations provide at favorable rates to support activities that have a direct charitable purpose. Frequently referred to as PRIs, they expand the resources from foundations — and, in the right circumstances, can be even more effective than grants. Any foundation can make PRIs, yet most shy away from them. In this guide, experienced PRI makers walk through the process, offering practical advice at each step — from explaining the concept to your board to structuring and closing your first deal.
(Last checked 11/20/06)

PROGRAM-RELATED INVESTMENTS: MORE COMPLICATED THAN GRANTS, BUT WORTH CONSIDERING
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/116/fundraising.html
The term “program-related investment” (PRI) was first coined in the Tax Reform Act of 1969. As currently defined in the tax code, a PRI is any investment by a foundation that meets three tests: 1) its primary purpose is to further the tax exempt purposes of the foundation; 2) the production of income or property is not a significant purpose (meaning that a prudent investor seeking a market return would not enter into the transaction); and 3) it is not used to lobby or support lobbying. Unlike a grant, PRIs are expected to be repaid. Article by Robert Jaquay, Shelterforce Online, Number 116, March/April 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING
http://www.npccny.org/info/fr16.htm
Eleanor McGee and Meg Riley’s workshop on proposal writing offered some great advice for preparing corporate and foundation grants and government contracts for beginners. This article originally appeared in the November 2004 issue of NPCC's monthly newsletter, New York Nonprofits.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING AND FUNDRAISING TOOLKIT
http://web.archive.org/web/20071222153638/http://www.gdnet.org/middle.php?oid=363
This toolkit provides tips and practical suggestions for applying for funding and proposal writing. It is based on interviews with experienced research fundraisers. Obtaining funding for your research is a difficult achievement, so we hope this guide will help give your proposal the best possible chance of success. Advice from the Global Development Network. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING KIT: TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
http://www.venturesfoundation.org/pubs/other/pwk2.pdf
Advice from Bill Somerville, President, Philanthropic Ventures Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSAL WRITING SHORT COURSE
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/shortcourse/
The subject of this short course is proposal writing. But the proposal does not stand alone. It must be part of a process of planning and of research on, outreach to, and cultivation of potential foundation and corporate donors. Free online advice for those who can't attend a regularly scheduled training session. Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSALS FOR FUNDING: HOW TO GET MONEY OUT OF DONOR ORGANIZATIONS
Internet Archive Link
Practical advice for nonprofits serving low-income neighborhoods. By Phil Bartle, Seattle Community Network.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROPOSALS IN A NUTSHELL
http://www.slideshare.net/sustainableseattle/fundraising-proposal-writing-tips
Courtesy of Slideshare.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROS AND CONS OF FUNDRAISING
http://www.snpo.org/funding/prosandcons.php
Consider adding some new types of fundraising to your repertoire. Advice provided by the Society for Nonprofit Organizations.
(Last checked 03/27/06)

PROSPECT WORKSHEET
http://fdncenter.org/findfunders/wrksheet/index.html
Provides copies of a worksheet in various formats for recording important information about foundations and other funders provided courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROSPECT RESEARCH
http://www.fundraisersoftware.com/content/view/180/52/
Advice from Michel Hudson, Fundraiser Basic eNewsletter, Sept. 1, 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PROSPECTING : NEWS AND TIPS ON FUNDRAISING
http://philanthropy.com/news/prospecting
The Chronicle of Philanthropy is providing this online column featuring advice from charity executives on how to make appeals and improve them.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PSYCHOLOGY OF LETTER-READING FOR FUNDRAISERS
http://www.fundraisersoftware.com/content/view/172/52/
Advice by Kim Klein, Fundraiser Basic eNewsletter, January 2005.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

PUTTING THE HEAT ON A WARM PROSPECT
Internet Archive Link
Article by Deborah Block and Paul Karps appearing in Successful Fundraising Online, Nov. 2002. Note : second of three articles. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

QUESTIONS DONORS ASK AND HOW THEY CAN BE ANSWERED BY THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF NONT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
http://nccsdataweb.urban.org/PubApps/levis/questions.html
Why does a not-for-profit organization issue financial statements, or submit financial reports to federal and state governments? article by Wilson C. Levis, First published Philanthropy Monthly, September, 1983
(Last checked 07/31/14)

QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN REVIEWING A GRANT REQUEST
Internet Archive Link
Questions a foundation may ask. Courtesy of the Michigan Nonprofit Association. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

QUICK WAYS TO RAISE MONEY DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON
Internet Archive Link
There is a popular myth in fundraising circles that December is a great time to raise money and that people give away more, if not most, of the money they are going to donate in a year during this last month. Grassroots groups will meet in October or November to discuss how to "take advantage" of the winter holidays, often emerging frustrated because they haven’t come up with anything brilliant. An article by Kim Klein appearing in Canadian Fundraiser ENews, September 30, 2002. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RAISING MONEY FOR PROGRESSIVE ARTS AND CULTURE ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/109/fundraising.html
Progressive arts and culture groups must proactively put forward an inclusive picture of themselves, both as artists and audience. Many people do not see themselves reflected in the wealthy groups associated with the arts. However, the image of the starving artist alone in a seedy apartment is just as harmful; it implies that art is simply the expression of an individual artist. Highly talented people may also avoid careers in the arts when suffering is so much a part of the image. Redefine what arts and culture mean, and you will begin to attract an audience – and donor base – from all walks of life who will carry your message into the community at large. Article by Kim Klein, Shelterforce Online, Number 109, Jan./Feb. 2000.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RAISING MORE MONEY: BUILDING A SELF-SUSTAINING INDIVIDUAL GIVING PROGRAM
http://www.raisingmoremoney.com/
Terry Axelrod has launched a web site for nonprofit leaders, especially development folk, who are interested in building a self-sustaining individual giving program for their organizations. Although nearly 90% of all charitable contributions come from individual donors, the vast majority of organizations are still heavily dependent on corporate and foundation grants or special events. The site draws heavily from a workshop Terry's been teaching and even includes a free online version of the $5000 workshop! She promises to update the site regularly with resources of value to people raising money from individuals.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RATING AND EVALUATING PROSPECTS: WHOM DO YOU ASK FOR HOW MUCH
Internet Archive Link
No one would argue the fact that every fundraising campaign needs a goal and that everyone connected with the campaign, including prospective donors, needs to be aware of that goal. Then why do people so often fight the setting of a goal for each prospective donor and sharing that goal with the prospect? Trustees often blanch at the idea, and it is the rare solicitor who the first time he or she is told that there will be a suggested giving amount for each of his prospects does not respond with, "I can’t tell people what to give!" Chapter 7 of It's a Great Day to Fund-Raise! by Tony Poderis. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RATING AND SCREENING PROSPECTS
Internet Archive Link
New technologies are combining with tried-and-true techniques to improve the work of development staffs.  Prospect research expert Helen Bergan shows how electronic tools and sophisticated databases can be used to complement traditional procedures like peer screening--as organizations look for more efficient, more economical methods for appraising prospects. Grantsmanship Center News, Spring 2002. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE REALITIES OF FUND-RAISING COSTS AND ACCOUNTABILITY
http://nccsdataweb.urban.org/PubApps/levis/realities.html
An article by Stephen J. Smallwood and Wilson C. Lewis reprinted from the Philanthropy Monthly, September 1977.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RECRUITING YOUNGER DONORS
Internet Archive Link
OUR DONORS ARE DYING!" This cry, much like Chicken Little's, has rung through the air at fundraising conferences and made its way into the pages of fundraising periodicals for years. Well, I'm not ready to throw my hands up in despair. This is not a crisis: It's an opportunity. Many nonprofit organizations' donorfiles are skewed older. New donors who are joining the ranks are older too -- but these donors are living longer. The causes we raise funds for are contributing to this trend through their life-saving research and quality care. The key question that begs to be answered is: How can we recruit younger donors? Article by Mary Beth McIntyre appearing in Successful Fundraising Online, Sept. 2002. Note: 2nd article of three. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

REFERENCE GUIDE FOR APPROACHING A FOUNDATION
http://schoolhousepartners.net/blog/?p=37
Advice from Anita Shafer, Schoolhouse Partners Blog, June 1, 2009.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

REFERENCE GUIDE FOR SPECIAL EVENTS FUNDRAISING
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/guides/events.html
The Foundation Center has many resources to assist you in the planning and implementation of successful promotional and fundraising special events. Some of the topics covered in these books and periodicals include auctions, charity balls, phone-a-thons, walk-a-thons, raffles, and many other fundraising and promotional vehicles.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RELATIONSHIP TIPS FROM CORPORATE GRANTMAKERS
Internet Archive Link
Even Daddy Warbucks wants to feel like he’s more than his bank account. At the Phoenix Grants Forum 2005-2006 I recently attended, four corporate giving officers urged grant seekers to treat them like partners, not just funders. In fact, their biggest collective pet peeve was being made to feel like a walking wallet. Article by Mary McRae Miller, CEO appearing in Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue XII. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESEARCHING FUNDING SOURCES ON THE WEB
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/internet.htm
This article deals with researching fundraising information on individual donors, foundation, corporate and government sources online. Tips from Zimmerman, Lehman, a consulting firm in San Francisco.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESEARCHING INDIVIDUAL DONORS : REFERENCE GUIDE
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/guides/indivdonors.html
If you are looking for information on individual donors, this user aid will help you in your search. We have selected a few of the most important print and electronic resources for you to begin your search.
Identifying individual philanthropists is somewhat difficult because, unlike foundations, individuals are not required to disclose to the public their financial and philanthropic activities. Approaching wealthy public figures is often an unsuccessful strategy. Most celebrities are inundated with requests for money, and they may have no particular connection to the activities or location of your nonprofit organization.
Instead, focus on the potential resources in your own community. Cultivate personal relationships with prosperous local individuals. They have a connection to the community and an interest in its welfare, and may be more inclined to respond favorably to your approach. Search your local newspapers for human-interest stories profiling neighborhood figures who have prospered in business or in their professions and who are active in civic affairs and charitable causes. Networking with those who are acquainted with your prospect may also yield valuable information. Be sure to respect potential donors' privacy, however.
The resources listed here may help you identify or learn more about prospective individual donors. You will need to be both creative and flexible in your approach to seeking funds.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESOLVE INC.
HELP 4 NONPROFITS
http://www.help4nonprofits.com/
Practical advice from Hildy Gottlieb of Resolve, Inc., a company that provides consulting services to nonprofits.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT FOR YOUTH SERVICE PROFESSIONALS
Internet Archive Link
Federal document published in February 1998 by the National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth for the Family and Youth Services Bureau to offer advice on how to obtain additional funding to support youth service programs. Includes a useful chapter on preparing a funding proposal which also includes two samples proposal request letters. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESOURCE NOTES
Internet Archive Link
The Jackson County Office of MSU Extension has put together the following resources to assist nonprofit fundraisers:

Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESOURCES FOR GRANTSEEKERS
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL34012_20100706.pdf
This report describes key sources of information on government and private funding, and outlines eligibility for federal grants. Federal grants are intended for projects benefiting states and communities. Individuals may be eligible for other kinds of benefits or assistance, or small busineses and students may be eligible for loans. Free information is readily available to grantseekers who generally know best the details of their projects. The Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) describes 1600 federal programs, 1000 of them grants, and can be searched by keyword, subject, department or agency, program title, beneficiary, and applicant eligibility. Federal department and agency websites provide additional information and guidance, and provide state agency contacts. Once a program has been identified, eligible grantseekers may apply electronically for grants at the website Grants.gov through a uniform process for all agencies. Through Grants.gov, they may identify when federal funding notices and deadlines for a CFDA program become available, sign up for e-mail notification of funding opportunities, and track the progress of submitted applications. Merete F. Gerli, Congressional Research Service report number RL34012, July 6, 2010.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RESOURCES FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.idealist.org/if/idealist/en/FAQ/QuestionViewer/default?section=0&item=1491
A compilation of web links and advice from Putnam Barber, Editor, Internet Nonprofit Center, and Evergreen Society. Now sponsored by Idealist.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

REVISITING THE PHONE-A-THON
Internet Archive Link
An article by Kim Klein reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 18, Number 2, © Chardon Press, 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RIDING THE HORSE THE WAY IT'S GOING:
A DIFFERENT APPROACH TO BOARDS AND FUNDRAISING
http://www.help4nonprofits.com/NP_Bd_RidingTheHorse_Art.htm
Practical advice from Hildy Gottlieb of Resolve, Inc., a company that provides consulting services to nonprofits.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

RINGING UP A NEW WAY TO GIVE
http://philanthropy.com/free/articles/v12/i05/05000101.htm
Jennifer Moore and Grant Williams report on how online shopping malls are raising money for charities for a fee, but questions remain. Chronicle of Philanthropy, December 16, 1999.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE ROLE OF BOARD MEMBERS AND CEOS IN THE GRANTS PROCESS
Internet Archive Link
The old saying "it's not what you know but who you know" is very true in the grant-making arena. Despite what many believe, foundations invest in people, not in organizations. The investment in is the people who need services offered by organizations such as yours and the people who provide those services. Advice from Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, March 5, 2002. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (ANTI-ABORTION NEWSPAPER INSERT FUNDING)
http://www.afterabortion.info/funds/grantsamp.htm
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (BEREA CHILDREN'S HOME AND FAMILY SERVICES)
Internet Archive Link
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (CENTERVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER)
http://coloradogrants.org/assets/pdf/centerville-community-center.pdf
A sample proposal prepared by Grants West of Denver, Colorado, and fully funded by local foundations (while the name of the organization has been changed, the proposal is presented in its actual format).
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (CITY OF HALSEY)
http://www.4grants.net/City%20of%20Halsey%20Proposal.pdf
Seeking funding for an "all-in-one community center".
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (INK PEOPLE)
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/grant-proposal-inkpeople-james-irvine-foundation/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-08-04
Proposal to James Irvine Foundation from Ink People Center for the Arts for the Media and Arts Resource Zone (MARZ) project, an arts and media after-school program, that works with youth to develop leadership and job skills, to improve self-esteem, and deepen community connections by focusing on the core fields of video documentary making, music, art, and creative writing.(Grant request: $50,000)
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (MIDTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION)
Internet Archive Link
Sample provided courtesy of the Dyer-Ives Foundation of Grand Rapids. Includes cover sheet, proposal summary, statement of need, project description, narrative, funding request, evaluation, documentation, supplementary information, and concluding statement. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS (NEA) FOLK ARTS)
https://4good.org/libby-maynard/grant-proposal-to-the-nea-from-the-hmong-community-of-the-northcoast-the-ink-people-center-for-the-arts
Grant proposal to National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Folk Arts from the Hmong Community of the Northcoast, The Ink People Center for the Arts to fund The Hmong Community Cultural Transmission Project an essential effort to preserve, restore and continue traditional Hmong culture within the context of millennial America.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (PEDOMETER USAGE IN A SCHOOL CURRICULUM)
Internet Archive Link
Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (POLLUTION PREVENTION/SOURCE REDUCTION PROJECT)
http://www.federalgrants.com/grant-writing.html
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (READ TO SUCCEED PROGRAM)
http://www.kurzweiledu.com/files/proof_resources_grant1.pdf
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (SHOES THAT FIT)
https://www.ideaencore.com/item/proposal-annenberg-foundation-shoes-fit/?utm_source=GuideStar&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=2011-08-04
Shoes That Fit, a California children's charity, submitted this proposal letter to the Annenberg Foundation in 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (ST. FRANCIS CENTER)
http://www.coloradogrants.org/sfc.html
The following proposal, prepared by Grants West of Denver, Colorado, and fully funded by local foundations, outlines a specific health care program serving homeless adults.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (ST. FRANCIS CENTER)
http://www.coloradogrants.org/sfc2.html
The following proposal, prepared by Grants West of Denver, Colorado, and fully funded by local foundations, outlines a specific job placement program for homeless adults, describing in detail different program phases and strategies.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL (U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FOR LITTLE TOKYO SERVICE CENTER)
https://4good.org/4good/grant-proposal-from-little-tokyo-service-center-to-us-department-of-health-and-human-services
This grant proposal from the Little Tokyo Service Center to US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families is for support to provide a suite of critically needed supportive services that help individuals and families achieve self-sufficiency, strengthen families, and make a positive investment in the future.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSAL FORMAT
https://4good.org/dalya-massachi/sample-grant-proposal-format
This is a sample of the information you will need to collect for a funding proposal. Always go by the specific funder’s requested format, but if they give little or no direction this is a good place to start. Dayla Massachi.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE GRANT PROPOSALS (4GRANTS.NET)
http://www.4grants.net/samples.htm
The City of Halsey proposes to build a community center and Truckee Meadows Community College seeks a small grant to promote an internet course.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SAMPLE PROPOSALS FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION : CENTER FOR FAITH-BASED AND COMMUNITY INITIATIVES
Internet Archive Link
Six previously-funded full proposals: a proposal to become a Supplemental Educational Services provider, a proposal to the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, a proposal to the Safe and Drug Free Schools Mentoring Program, a proposal to the Migrant Education High School Equivalency Program, a proposal to the Migrant Education Even Start Program, and a proposal to the Community Technology Centers Program. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SCHMOOZING 101: DEVELOPING RELATIONSHIPS WITH FOUNDATION OFFICERS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/93/fund.html
The old fundraiser's cliche, "People give money to people, not organizations," is especially relevant in the grantmaking world. Here are a few guidelines for creating healthy, productive relationships with funders. Discusses the value of developing strong, healthy relationships with grantmakers and recommends five points to remember:
(1) All grantmakers are unique – it's not a standard process.
(2) Treat foundation officers as peers. Get off your knees and stop begging.
(3) Be professional. Do your homework, follow instructions, honor your commitments.
(4) You're human, so admit it. Acknowledge your mistakes – remember, you're dealing with peers, so it doesn't pay to cover things up – and describe your plans to improve the situation.
(5) Accept defeat gracefully and move on. It's okay to ask why a proposal was turned down, but never whine, complain, or get angry.
Article by Andy Robinson, Shelterforce Online, Number 93, May/June 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SCHMOOZING 102: HOW TO MEET FOUNDATION OFFICERS
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/94/fundrais.html
Here are five ideas for getting your foot in the door:
(1) Meet them at the foundation office.
(2) Attend "meet the grantmaker" events.
(3) Go to conferences.
(4) Invite grants officers to visit your facility.
(5) Invite funders to observe your group in action.
Article by Andy Robinson, Shelterforce Online, Number 94, July/Aug. 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SCRAMBLING FOR SCRIP
https://web.archive.org/web/20130205170405/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/Scrambling%20for%20Scrip.pdf
For churches, schools, and small nonprofits, scrip sales help to supplement tight budgets and pay for special projects. And because the organization's supporters are spending money they would have spent anyway - for groceries, clothing, entertainment - it's easy to get them into the scrip-buying habit. An article which originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times and shared by the Grantsmanship Center News. Note: The Okemos High School Band purchases gift certificates from the Michigan Meijer stores and sells them as a fundraiser. A percentage of each certificate sold goes to the High School Band.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SELLING SEALS OF APPROVAL
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/selling.htm
How companies get charities to endorse their products. Article by John Merline, Slate, May 2, 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SELLING SOCIAL CHANGE : HOW TO EARN MONEY FROM YOUR MISSION
https://web.archive.org/web/20070714064246/http://www.rivernetwork.org/resource-library.php?ResourceID=642
Many nonprofits have gone way beyond selling t-shirts and coffee mugs, earning 10-40% of their revenue from mission-related sales. Some provide services: investment research, self-defense training, eco-tourism, curriculum development. Others publish books and reports about their issues and programs. Still others sell goods ranging from traditional garden seeds to musical CDs. All products are designed to support organizational goals; the fact that they generate income is an added benefit. Article by Andy Robinson posted by the River Network, June 5, 2002.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SENATOR DEBBIE STABENOW'S GRANT ASSISTANCE PAGE
http://stabenow.senate.gov/?p=grants
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SENDING OUT COLD PROPOSALS: POTENTIAL OPPORTUNITY OR WASTE OF TIME
Internet Archive Link
The conventional wisdom in most fundraising circles is that sending out proposals "cold" is a waste of time. In order to get a grant, the conventional wisdom argues, it is necessary to cultivate and develop a relationship with a potential donor. This conventional wisdom applies to all donors -- foundations, corporations and individuals. Practical advice from Shelley Uva, Director of Development, Project FIND, Grants and Foundations Review, June 4, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SEVEN BASIC SKILLS OF FUNDRAISING : ON OR OFF THE WEB
Internet Archive Link
Whether you are new or old to the fundraising profession, whether you raise funds on the web or in the old fashioned way (or both), here are some basic skills and knowledge that you need for your job. Mastering these tasks will increase your chances of raising more money and enjoying your work. Advice from Eileen Heisman, President, National Philanthropic Trust, Aug 13, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE SHOTGUN APPROACH
Internet Archive Link
The "shotgun approach" refers to a proposal submission tactic that seems to be used by far too many organizations. The basic premise is to identify as many possible funding sources as possible and send applications to each of them, hoping something will hit the "target." Normally the application is identical with only the address and salutation changed. The results are normally to the same -- dismal to no response from the "pot of gold" agencies believed was simply waiting for them. Advice from Julie Seewald Bornhoeft, CFRE , Grants and Foundations Review, October 2, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SHOULD YOUR ORGANIZATION SELL PRODUCTS AND SERVICES TO RAISE MONEY?
https://web.archive.org/web/20071006151514/http://www.raise-funds.com/1001forum.html
Advice from Tony Poderis, Non-Profit Forum.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE SITE VISIT
Internet Archive Link
So, you got the call. The foundation you went to for that big grant wants to come see your organization at work. This is great news. Although it is no guarantee of funding -- something the program officer is likely to tell you -- it means you have survived several levels of weeding out and are on the precipice of funding. Foundation program officers and trustees are busy people and do not waste their time on courtesy calls. If they come to perform a site visit, chances are they want to fund you. Can you blow it? Sure. But here are a few pointers that can help you seal the deal. Advice from Tony Silbert, Grants and Foundations Review, Dec. 3, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SMALL-TOWN LIMITATIONS DON'T REDUCE FUNDRAISING OPTIONS
Internet Archive Link
Need to raise money for a project in a small community? Practical advice from Sabrina Jones, Appalachian Regional Commission. This article originally appeared in Rural Roots, a bimonthly newsletter of the Rural School and Community Trust, Volume 4, Number 1, February 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SOME THINGS THEY NEVER TOLD ME BEFORE I TOOK THIS JOB
Internet Archive Link
Grants Coordinator at Steely Library was a newly created position. I started from scratch. There was no one prior to pass on inside tips and words of wisdom. So, I discovered, in short time, some things they never told me before I took this job. Practical advice from Laura Sullivan, Associate Professor/Grants Coordinator, Northern Kentucky University Libraries, Grants and Foundations Review, Dec. 16, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SOUTHERN ONTARIO LIBRARY SERVICE
FUNDING DEVELOPMENT
Internet Archive Link
Fundraising advice from a Canadian library consortium. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPECIAL EVENT FUNDRAISING
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/special_events.html
Been thinking about launching that special event? Here are some resources to get you started.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPECIAL EVENTS: A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/special.htm
Special events are the most difficult, the most labor-intensive and the most harrowing means of nonprofit fundraising known to humankind. However, a well-orchestrated special event is crucial to your overall development effort. This article will help you plan a successful special event. Tips from Zimmerman, Lehman, a private consulting firm in San Francisco, Ca.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPECIAL EVENTS AND FACILITY RENTAL MARKETING
http://web.archive.org/web/20071013185503/http://museummarketingtips.com/links/links_events.html
Have you ever considered renting out your organization's building as a fundraiser? This web site provides tips on that topic as well as special events fundraising in general. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPECIAL EVENTS PLANNING
http://www.grantspace.org/Tools/Knowledge-Base/Funding-Resources/Individual-Donors/Special-events
Advice and resources from the Foundation Center's GrantSpace.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPECIALTY COMPANIES ARE MAKING E-PHILANTHROPY EASY
http://ecommerce-guide.com/news/trends/article.php/3489781
For small to mid-size nonprofits looking to take their fundraising online, or improve current efforts, the 'build or buy' decision is becoming a whole lot easier, thanks to the emergence of a handful of socially responsible, e-commerce-savvy companies. Article by Jennifer Schiff posted in Ecommerce-guide.com, March 14, 2005.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SPONSORSHIPS AND UNDERWRITING CAMPAIGNS : WOULD YOU PLEASE FUND OUR ...?
http://www.raise-funds.com/1999/sponsorships-and-underwriting-campaigns-would-you-please-fund-our/
Sponsorships and underwriting are different labels for basically the same thing: funding donated for the support of a project, program, event, initiative, activity, or even a salary. In general, foundations are identified as underwriters and corporations as sponsors. Individuals can be either, but in most instances underwriters and sponsors will be foundations and corporations. Advice from Tony Poderis, a fundraising consultant.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STALKING THE SILENT BEQUEST : THREE MYTHS ABOUT BEQUEST DONORS
Online access available to MSU Faculty, Staff, and Students via Fund Raising Management
You may think that courting legacy gifts will interfere with getting the gifts you need today, that current gifts will help your position in your organization more than deferred gifts, or that soliciting bequests will be too uncomfortable. These are all unsupported myths. Learn how to counter them. Article by Katherine H. Caldwell appearing in Fund Raising Management, Vol.29, No.9, Hoke Communications, Garden City, New York (NY), November 1, 1998, pp. 24-27.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STARTING A GRANT-SEEKING PROGRAM
Internet Archive Link
Advice from The Fund For Animals. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STARTING A NEW PROGRAM : IS IT REALLY FEASIBLE AND HOW WILL WE FUND IT AND WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
http://www.help4nonprofits.com/NP_START_IsItFeasible_Art.htm
"I've got a great idea for a new program! Lets form a NonProfit, and then we can get grants!" Sound familiar? Starting a new program is exciting. But without doing your homework first, your program is much more likely to fail. The 3 Questions of Feasibility Study : (1) What do we want this program to accomplish for our community?; (2) Is this project really needed?; (3) If it is needed, what will it take internally to make this program a reality? Article by Hildy Gottlieb originally published for ReSolve, Inc. 2000. Still available via Help 4 NonProfits, Community-Driven Institute.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STATE LIBRARY OF IOWA
FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES OF INTEREST TO LIBRARIES
http://www.statelibraryofiowa.org/ld/f-h/funding-info/opp
Features current funding sources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STEP BY STEP FUNDRAISING
http://stepbystepfundraising.com/
On this site you'll find how-to articles and guides that provide step-by-step, practical resources for fundraisers. The fundraising ideas presented on this site come from real fundraisers, just like you. You will get the real inside scoop about what works and what doesn't, saving you lots of time and effort. If you're new here, the best place to start is to get a copy of The 5 Keys to Successful Fundraising. This is our free guide that will help you in your fundraising planning & strategy. Whether you are a newbie, or an experienced fundraiser this guide will give you a fresh perspective on fundraising for your organization.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STEPS TO EFFECTIVE GRANT WRITING
Internet Archive Link
Tips from James L. Tanner, Ph.D., Vice President, Correctional Management, Inc., 207 Canyon #205, Boulder, CO 80302; telephone: (303)449-3560; e-mail: tanner@c-m-i.com. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STONE SOUP : A RECIPE FOR FINDING FUNDING
Internet Archive Link
Some organizations look for a grant to be their fairy godmother, the one source to fulfill their needs with the wave of a magic wand. But fairy godmothers are in short supply these days and nonprofits would do better to turn to another folk tale for inspiration –Stone Soup. An article by Kristan Hutchison appearing in the Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume IV, Issue VIII, November 1, 2006. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

STRATEGIC PLANNING AS FUEL FOR GRANTS DEVELOPMENT
Internet Archive Link
Too often in this field we find ourselves writing grant proposals in a vacuum just to satisfy immediate needs. How often have you heard a fellow staff member or board member identify a need and follow up with "we'll get a grant for it!" This approach to fund development ignores the importance of linking grant requests to the larger organizational mission. Not only is it difficult for the grantwriter to persuasively convey the need and rationale for such disparate projects, but even more difficult for the foundation trustees to understand how their gift will be an investment, not just a short-term bailout. What can we do to avoid this? Develop a strategic plan. Article by Sheila Lischwe, Grants and Foundations Review, Apr 14, 2004. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SUCCESSFUL NONPROFIT GRANT DEVELOPMENT WEBINAR
Successful Nonprofit Grant Development
Courtesy of Melanie Swith from CharityNet USA
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SUSTAINABILITY : IT REQUIRES MORE THAN MONEY (Pt. 1)
http://pndblog.typepad.com/pndblog/2011/07/sustainability-requires-more-than-money-pt-1.html
What's needed to sustain programs and/or services launched or expanded with grant funding? (Editor's note: this is the first of three posts from Kevin Monroe, founder and managing partner of X Factor Consulting LLC, and FC Atlanta's Expert in Residence for July.) Philantropic, July 26, 2011.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

SUSTAINABILITY : IT REQUIRES MORE THAN MONEY (Pt. 2)
http://pndblog.typepad.com/pndblog/2011/07/sustainability-requires-more-than-money-pt-2.html
(This is the second of three posts on organizational sustainability by Kevin Monroe, founder and managing partner of X Factor Consulting LLC and FC Atlanta's Expert in Residence for July. In his previous post, he wrote about the importance of producing, documenting, packaging, and promoting program results.) Philantropic, July 28, 2011.
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TAKE TEN MINUTES: PRINCIPLES TO CONSIDER BEFORE ENGAGING IN FUND RAISING
http://web.archive.org/web/20100528162438/http://www.austincc.edu/npo/library/documents/Take%20Ten%20Minutes%20Eng.pdf
Barry Silverberg, Austin Community College - Texas, lists eight fundamental principles that are essential for fund raising success.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TAKING THE MYSTERY OUT OF THE GRANT PROCESS
Internet Archive Link
Here are some suggestions that may help sheriffs take advantage of grants as a funding source. An article by Louise Grimm appearing in Sheriff Times, Fall 1996, Vol. 1, No. 3. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

A TALE OF TWO FUND RAISERS!
Online access available to MSU Faculty, Staff, and Students via Fund Raising Management
Two different organizations raising funds for needy people overseas are contrasted in this article. Much about their missions and ministries are similar, but the two different approaches they take to direct mail fund raising produce markedly different results! Article by Bruce Campbell appearing in Fund Raising Management, Vol. 30, No. 5, Hoke Communications, Garden City, New York (NY), July 1, 1999, pp. 26-27.
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TAX BREAK PROMPTS MILLIONAIRES TO CREATE PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/cfrnet2.htm
A sample CFRNET mailing list posting, January 27, 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TAX INFORMATION FOR CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS
http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/index.html
Advice from the Internal Revenue Service.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TECHNOLOGY AS A FUNDRAISING TOOL
Internet Archive Link
Technology isn't just something that takes money -- it can also make it! Here are ways, some ingenious, for using technology to add some digits to your bottom line. Topics include online donations, shopping portals, auctions, affinity portals, and E-commerce. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TEMPLATES FOR WRITING GRANT POLICY STATEMENTS
http://web.archive.org/web/20130205171226/http://www.tgci.com/magazine/Templates%20for%20Writing%20Grants%20Policy%20Statements.pdf
Advice from Henry Flood, Grantsmanship Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TEN ESSENTIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF FOUNDATION BOARD CHAIRS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130706180725/http://www.michiganfoundations.org/s_cmf/bin.asp?CID=2528&DID=17880&DOC=FILE.PDF
Few roles are more significant in ensuring a foundation’s success than that of the board chair. But many board chairs find the role daunting and lack understanding of what is expected of them. This 22-page resource will help new and seasoned board chairs understand their 10 essential responsibilities and gain practical tips for carrying them out. The responsibilities are adaptable to all foundation types: family, community, private/independent or unstaffed. It was published by BoardSource, the national voice of nonprofit governance, with support from the Council of Michigan Foundations.
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TEN MOST COMMON REASONS GRANTS ARE DECLINED
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/ten.htm
Practical advice from the former Grantseeker.Com Learning Center Home Page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TEN QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF WHEN SEEKING PROGRAM GRANTS
http://www.sumptionandwyland.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=40&Itemid=57&rid=57
Most grants are awarded to existing nonprofit organizations to establish or expand programs and services. If your organization is thinking about seeking grants to support a program, here are ten questions to ask...
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TEN THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT BUDGETS
Internet Archive Link
Here are a few things to consider or think about so that you can present meaningful budget information to your funders. Advice from Robert Wittig, Grants and Foundations Review, Nov 4, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
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TEN TIPS FOR GRANTWRITING
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/zim41011.htm
More tips from Zimmerman Lehman.
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TEN TIPS FOR SECURING CORPORATE FUNDING
http://web.archive.org/web/20101205134224/http://www.funding-exchange.org/resources/articles/corporatefunding.php
Many nonprofit organizations seek corporate funding as a part of their revenue mix - sometimes at the expense of developing more sustainable sources of revenue, but that is a topic for another day. Corporate funders have some similarities to other donors, and some significant differences. Here are ten tips to give your organization a better chance to secure corporate funding. An article by Blythe Campbell appearing in the Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue XI.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TEN WAYS THAT NONPROFITS RAISE MONEY
Internet Archive Link
Zimmerman Lehman has never had a client--no matter how sophisticated about fundraising, no matter how many resources the client was pouring into development--that was raising funds in every way appropriate to it. Be it corporate solicitation, planned giving, direct mail or major gift approaches -- every nonprofit in our experience has missed at least one bet. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TEN WAYS TO SAY "THANKS"
Internet Archive Link
Building and maintaining donor relationships secures continued support for your mission. An effective donor recognition program can help keep those relationships strong. Corporate and foundation funders often have different recognition needs than individual donors. Don’t assume all donors want the same thing. Ask how they would like to be recognized, then customize your recognition for each donor. Try one or more of these ten ways to thank them.... Article by Blythe Campbell appering in the Alaska Funding Exchange, Volume III, Issue XIII. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
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THREE KEYS TO WRITING GOOD NARRATIVES (GRANT WRITING TIPS)
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/threekey.htm
An electronic reprint from Aid for Education, a CD Publication newsletter.
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TIME MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR FUNDRAISERS
Internet Archive Link
An article by Kim Klein reprinted from the Grassroots Fundraising Journal, Volume 17, Number 3, copyright Chardon Press, 1998
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TIPS FOR CORPORATE FUNDRAISING
http://communitysector.nl.ca/voluntary-sector-resources/funding-and-fundraising/tips-corporate-fundraising
There is no doubt about it - corporations want to give back to the community, and in turn, enhance their image to current and future customers. Knowing that these companies exist and that they are interested in supporting the voluntary sector is encouraging, but it is important to keep in mind that simply writing a letter asking for support is rarely successful, if that is all your organization is willing to do. Companies get several of these letters each year, but they can only support or sponsor a limited number of organizations. EnVision.ca offers some tips to help your organization obtain private sector support:
(1) Know what you are looking for.
(2) Know whom you are asking.
(3) Put your plans in writing.
(4) Be flexible.
(5) Know who and how to ask.
(6) Partner with other organizations.
(7) Shop around for potential corporate donors/sponsors/partners.
(8) Thank your corporate donor!
Courtesy of Envision.ca
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TIPS FOR GRANTWRITING
http://web.archive.org/web/20070518141016/http://users.aristotle.net/~nonprofit/resources/tips.html
Compiled and maintained by Nonprofit Resources, Little Rock, Arkansas.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TIPS FOR NEW GRANT WRITERS
Internet Archive Link
Some of you may have come to the career of grant writer in a more focused way. Maybe you took a course in grant writing. Maybe you had some other job at a non-profit and grant writing has just been handed over to you. However you got here, my first bit of advice to you as a new grant writer is to remember that even if you have never had any prior experience with grant writing, you surely know at least what writing is, and grant writing, first and foremost, is writing. Advice from Shelley Uva, Charity Channel, March 12, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TIPS FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSALS ONLINE
Internet Archive Link
Submitting a proposal online need not be a painful experience. A little preparation can help ensure that your bids for funding via an online application are as competitive as any other grant requests that you make for your organization. Practical advice from Marilyn Gross and Michele Hickey, Grants and Foundations Review, May 20, 2003. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TIPS FOR WINNING FEDERAL GRANTS
Internet Archive Link
My advice for winning federal grants: the real product is the process as much as the final document submitted to the funding agency. Advice from Lawrence H. Trachtman, Grants and Foundations Review, March 19, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR YEAR-END FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGNS
http://www.wildapricot.com/blogs/newsblog/archive/2007/11/29/tips-to-manage-your-year-end-fundraising-campaigns.aspx
It's crunch time for nonprofit fundraisers looking to take advantage of the holiday giving season. If you don't have a plan in place yet, no worries. This guide from Care2's Eric Rardin and Heather Holdridge, along with Mark Rovner and Sarah Haug of Sea Change Strategies, "A Procrastinator's Guide to Year-End Fundraising" will give you a crash course on best practices for maximizing online giving and how to connect with new supporters, and communicate year-round to foster the best possible relationships with donors. This well written, concise guide is a must-read.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TONY PODERIS'S FUNDRAISING LIBRARY
Also listed as Fund Raising Forum Library
http://www.raise-funds.com/table-of-contents-2/
A collection of articles related to fundraising maintained by Tony Poderis, professional consultant, speaker, and author on development, this site offers scores of articles on fundraising, finding funding sources, organizing and managing campaigns, and creating development teams.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP 50 CORPORATE GRANTMAKERS BY ASSET SIZE
http://foundationcenter.org/findfunders/topfunders/top50assets.html
Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP 50 CORPORATE GRANTMAKERS BY TOTAL GIVING
http://foundationcenter.org/findfunders/topfunders/top50giving.html
Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP 100 U.S. FOUNDATIONS BY ASSET SIZE
http://fdncenter.org/findfunders/topfunders/top100assets.html
Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP 100 U.S FOUNDATIONS BY TOTAL GIVING
http://foundationcenter.org/findfunders/topfunders/top100giving.html
Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP FUNDERS BY TYPE
http://fdncenter.org/findfunders/statistics/gm_topfund.html
Courtesy of the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TOP TEN REASONS TO HOLD AN ANNUAL CAMPAIGN --
EVEN THOUGH YOU JUST INHERITED A MILLION DOLLARS
http://staff.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/talklet1.htm
Practical tips from Ken Wyman. A sample Talk-AmPhilRev message.
(Last checked 07/31/14

THE TRUTH ABOUT SITE VISITS: WHY GRANTMAKERS DO THEM; WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW
Internet Archive Link
Site visits are a single but critical step in most agencies' attempts to secure funding and implement programming. As with every step in that process -- from grantwriting to hiring employees -- preparation and planning are key to improving an agency's chances for success in obtaining a grant. Grantmaking employees offer several rules of thumb for agencies readying for a site visit. An online article by Joel Hoekstra appearing in Giving Forum Online: The Online Newspaper of the Minnesota Council of Foundations, Spring 1999. Note : link works best in Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

TWELVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD PROPOSAL
http://www.nonprofitalliance.org/system/res/4/original/12_elements_of_a_good_proposal.pdf
Proposals come in all shapes, lengths, and sizes, but it is possible to identify some generic characteristics that are hallmarks of a good proposal. These characteristics are listed here in particular order of priority. Joel J. Orosz, Grand Valley State University, 2000.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS COMMUNITY TOOLBOX : WRITING A GRANT
http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/sub_section_main_1301.aspx
This guide answers basic questions about grants and grant writing, and includes a breakdown of the important components of a grant proposal.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

UNUSUAL GRANTS : AN ONLINE LEGAL GUIDE FOR PUBLIC CHARITIES
https://web.archive.org/web/20131003104554/http://www.cof.org/files/Documents/Legal/Unusual-Grants.pdf
Grantmaking is a key function of community foundations and many other public charities. Most of the grants these charities make are to other public charities, and the legal aspects of the transactions are fairly straightforward; the grantmaker ascertains that the grantee organization has been determined by the IRS to be a publicly supported charitable organization, and the grantmaker sends a check. However, when grantmakers wish to support the charitable activities of organizations that do not have an IRS determination letter that describes them as a 501(c)(3) entity, the process can be more complicated. This resource is a guide to eight areas in which community foundations and other public charities often wish to make grants. It provides links to specific legal information and resources on grants to religious institutions, grants to government, grants to non-charitable exempt organizations, international grantmaking, fiscal sponsorships, disaster relief and emergency hardship grants, scholarships and grants to private foundations. As always, general legal information is no substitute for the advice of knowledgeable counsel when it comes to a specific situation confronting a grantmaker. Jane Nober, Special Counsel, Council on Foundations, September 2005. Still available thanks to the Internet Archive.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE UPS AND DOWNS OF USING A FISCAL AGENT TO APPLY FOR GRANTS
http://blog.seliger.com/2010/07/05/the-ups-and-downs-of-using-a-fiscal-agent-to-apply-for-grants/#more-658
Most government grant programs and almost all foundations require that the applicant be a public benefit, tax exempt organization, but one can also use a fiscal agent/fiscal sponsor. A fiscal agent can enable an individual (e.g., artist, researcher, inventor, explorer looking for the The Lost City of Z,* etc.) or unincorporated associations (e.g., Citizens for a Better Owatonna, Residents United Against Everything, etc.) to be considered for grants. The ineligible individual or entity has to make a deal with the 501(c)(3) organization to, in effect, borrow their tax exempt status and be responsible for the grant funds received. Courtesy of Seliger Associates.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING AN OUTSIDE EVALUATOR
http://www.prolifica.org/uploads/Using%20an%20Outside%20Evaluator.pdf
In many cases with larger grants or complex projects you'll want or need to hire an outside evaluator. Courtesy of Prolifica.org
Advice from Michael Wells.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING DATA TO SUPPORT GRANT APPLICATIONS AND OTHER FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
http://www.cridata.org/tutorials.aspx
This article outlines methods by which data can be used to improve the work of nonprofits and community groups. This document identifies sources of data, sections of a grant that need to be backed up by data, and ineffective and effective uses of data. Courtesy of Grand Valley State University, Community Research Institute, 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING DISCRETION : WHAT EXACTLY ARE TRUSTEE DISCRETIONARY FUNDS? WHO GIVES THEM? HOW ARE THEY USED? WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF ALLOCATING THESE TYPES OF GRANTS ? HERE ARE SOME ANSWERS
https://web.archive.org/web/20130927153921/http://www.foundationnews.org/CME/article.cfm?ID=2750
According to the Council on Foundations, approximately 26 percent of grantmakers permit board members to allocate discretionary grants (Foundation Management Series, Governing Boards, Vol. II, 10th Edition, 2002). Family foundations are more likely than other types of grantmakers to allow such allocations (48 percent). And the practice appears to be on the rise: The 2001 rate is a 5 percentage point increase from the 1999 survey (9th Edition) and a 9 percentage point increase from the 1997 survey (8th Edition), when only 38 percent of family foundations provided discretionary grants to their trustees. Article by Lee Draper. Foundation News & Commentary, January-February 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING ONLINE RESOURCES TO INCREASE FUNDRAISING REVENUE
web link
You’ve built a Web site to build awareness of your cause. Leverage that investment and keep your constituents donating throughout the year by adding online donation capabilities. Online giving will maximize your fundraising efforts, give your supporters more opportunities to donate, and enable you to make donation easy for new supporters. Courtesy of Auctionpay. May require free registration to access additional resources.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING OUTCOME EVALUATION TO GUIDE GRANTMAKING: THEORY, REALITY, AND POSSIBILITIES
Internet Archive Link
Doug Easterling, University of North Carolina at Greensboro. May 1, 2000. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

USING THE BUDGET TO TELL YOUR STORY
http://www.multiculturaladvantage.com/opportunity/grants/read/Using-the-Budget-to-Tell-Your-Story.asp
For some grantwriters, the budget seems cut and dried. It tells how much money you need to do the project described in your narrative. It's often left to the fiscal or program folks to develop. This approach misses the opportunity to use the budget to support your narrative and strengthen your proposal... Courtesy of Michael Wells, The Multicultural Advantage, July 21, 2004.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION EVALUATION HANDBOOK
http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge-center/resources/2010/W-K-Kellogg-Foundation-Evaluation-Handbook.aspx
This handbook provides a framework for thinking about evaluation as a relevant and useful program tool. It was written primarily for project directors who have direct responsibility for the ongoing evaluation of W. K. Kellogg Foundation-funded projects.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION LOGIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge-center/resources/2006/02/WK-Kellogg-Foundation-Logic-Model-Development-Guide.aspx
Nonprofits today are being pressed to demonstrate the effectiveness of their program activities by initiating and completing outcome-oriented evaluation of projects. This guide was developed to provide practical assistance to nonprofits engaged in this process. In the pages of this guide, we hope to give staff of nonprofits and community members alike sufficient orientation to the underlying principles of "logic modeling" to use this tool to enhance their program planning, implementation, and dissemination activities.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WEALTH OF INFORMATION ON FOUNDATIONS AND THE GRANT SEEKING PROCESS
http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/may00/camarena.htm
Article by Janet Camarena, Foundation Center-San Francisco, appearing in Computers In Libraries, Vol. 20, No. 5, May 20, 2000. Focuses on the top foundations and top grants in the library field, provides background information on foundations, provides you with a guided tour of the grant seeking process, and concludes with a list of fundraising resources and components of key proposals.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WEB-WISE FUNDRAISING
http://www.sover.net/~paulven/workshop/funds.html
A collection of sites on the World Wide Web recommended for learning more about how the Internet is being used to communicate with donors, identify grant opportunities, provide fundraisers with news about their profession and, in general, assist the fundraising efforts of organizations like yours. Includes a presentation made to the 1997 New England Nonprofit Exposition, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, July 29, 1997. Sponsored by Paul Ventura and the Vermont Community Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WEIGHT LIFTING FOR NON-PROFITS : CAPACITY-BUILDING GRANTS EXPLAINED
http://www.prolifica.org/uploads/Capacity%20Building%20Grants%20Explained.pdf
Grants to organizations for capacity-building purposes are certainly not new. However, in the last several years, a targeted effort from certain federal agencies and some community foundations to reach out to the rapidly growing number of faith-based and community-based organizations has brought this special type of grant to the fore. There are now many opportunities for receiving capacity-building funds, especially for smaller or new non-profits. Article by Cheryl Kester appearing in Grants and Foundations Review, July 27, 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT ARE IN-KIND GIFTS AND HOW CAN I FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THEM?
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/inkind.html
This Foundation Center FAQ defines in-kind gifts and provides a guide for categorization for documentation purposes.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT GOES ON BEHIND FOUNDATION DOORS, OR, A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A PROGRAM OFFICER
Internet Archive Link
If there was only one tip I could offer to anyone submitting a grant proposal, it would be this ... Remember that you are writing for one human being, not an institution. Advice from Renata Rafferty, Grants and Foundations Review, April 30, 2002. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT GRANTMAKERS WANT APPLICANTS TO KNOW
http://www.guidestar.org/news/features/grantadvice.jsp
Also labeled as Guidestar's Tips for Grant Seekers. Competition for foundation money can be intense. To help nonprofits increase their chances of success, GuideStar asked grantmakers what they would most like to tell applicants. Includes 15 recommendations.
Note: you can also access other Guidestar articles from the archives link.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT IS A FUNDRAISING FEASIBILITY STUDY AND IS IT WORTH IT?
http://www.compasspoint.org/board-cafe/what-fundraising-feasibility-study-and-it-worth-it
When nonprofit boards consider a special, major fundraising campaign-such as one to purchase a building or start an endowment-they often ask: Should we or shouldn't we? Can we really raise this much money? Do we have the right people on the board? Out there in the world, is our organization liked? Respected? By whom? Advice from P. Burke Keegan, the Board Cafe, August 31, 2001.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT MAKES A FUNDRAISING LETTER EFFECTIVE?
Internet Archive Link
Most fundraisers apparently think fundraising letters are all pretty much the same. Wrong! Advice from Mal Warwick, Successful Fundraising Online, March 2001. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT PROSPECT RESEARCHERS DO
Internet Archive Link
A compilation of PRSPCT-L messages compiled by Cindy Rice. Courtesy of Gary Cargill, University of Vermont. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT TO DO BEFORE YOU WRITE THE GRANT PROPOSAL
http://literacy.kent.edu/Oasis/grants/first.html
Advice from the Ohio Literacy Resource Center. Eight steps include:
(1) Identify your Organization's Strengths, Weaknesses and Identity
(2) Identify and Develop a Project that Supports your Organization's Core Mission
(3) Write a Short but Detailed Mini-Proposal or Project Description
(4) Research Potential Sources of Funding
(5) Identify Funders That Fit Your Organization's Ideas and Projects
(6) Obtain Application Guidelines and Information
(7) Clarify Any Questions About the Guidelines Before You Start Writing
(8) Divide the Labor of Preparing the Proposal and Get Started
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU ARE A ONE-MAN (OR WOMAN) BAND
Internet Archive Link
The fact is that many of us work in one-person development offices. In my case, the organization I work with actually never had a development officer before me. So, I practically began from scratch. That means, for example, that before I could write a direct mail letter, get it printed, develop a mailing list or send out any letters, I had to register my organization with the post office in order to get a bulk mail permit, attend a required bulk mail class and get an indicia made for use on envelopes... Practical advice from Shelley Uva, Director of Development, Project FIND, Aug 26, 2003 appearing in Grants and Foundations Review. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHEN BOARD MEMBERS WRIGGLE OUT OF FUNDRAISING
Internet Archive Link
Kim Klein, Grassroots Fundraising, 1989. Note: link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHEN TIMES ARE TOUGH, GET CREATIVE AND STRATEGIC
http://www.fieldstonealliance.org/client/tools_you_can_use/10-23-08_survive_tough_times.cfm
Advice from Fieldstone Alliance.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHERE CAN I FIND EXAMPLES OF GRANT PROPOSALS?
http://www.grantspace.org/Tools/Knowledge-Base/Funding-Research/Proposal-Writing/Grant-proposals
A Foundation Center frequently asked question with answers.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHERE CAN I FIND EXAMPLES OF LETTERS OF INQUIRY?
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/loi.html
A Foundation Center frequently asked question with answers.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHERE CAN I FIND EXAMPLES OF PROPOSAL COVER LETTERS?
http://fdncenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/coverletter.html
A Foundation Center frequently asked question with answers.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHY ARE PEOPLE AFRAID TO ASK FOR MONEY?
http://www.familyfirstfoundation.org/faq/afraid_to_ask_money.html
Discusses some of the reasons that asking for money is hard and to provide some tips to help people get over the fear of asking for money. In her article, Getting Over the Fear of Asking (1986 Grassroots Fundraising Journal), Kim Klein discusses the sources of fear and techniques for overcoming the barriers that prevent people from raising funds for their organizations. Family First Foundation.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHY DONORS GIVE : A TOPICAL RESOURCE LIST
http://foundationcenter.org/grantmakers/topicalresources/list13.html
Advice from the Foundation Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHY HIRE A CONSULTANT?
http://www.resourcedevelopmentnetwork.com/whyconsultant.htm
Resource Development Network provides this synopsis of postings on CharityChannel.com's Consultants Listserv.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WHY PEOPLE (AND FOUNDATIONS) GIVE AWAY THEIR MONEY
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/91/fundrais.html
A great deal of unnecessary mystery surrounds the process of philanthropy (a fancy word for "giving away money"). Dozens of books, articles, and sociological studies have analyzed the typical donor, trying to understand the philanthropic impulse. Professional fundraisers study these documents like sacred texts. Because the task of raising money makes so many people so uncomfortable, much foolishness has been written – and sold – to help people deal with their discomfort. To boil down the research and save you a bunch of reading, here's the number one reason people give away their money: somebody asked. If it's someone they know and trust – their sister-in-law, parish priest, or car mechanic – so much the better. All fundraising, including grantwriting, begins with the simple act of one person asking another for money. Article by Andy Robinson, Shelterforce Online, Number 91, Jan./Feb. 1997.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

THE WHY'S AND HOW'S OF LETTERS OF INQUIRY
Internet Archive Link
The Letter of Inquiry, usually a maximum of 2 to 3 pages, is often the preferred initial approach of many corporate and foundation funders. Writing a letter allows you to test your idea with a funder, to ensure that what you request matches their interests... Source: Laura Sullivan, Grants and Foundations Review, May 11, 2004. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WINNING SUPPORT FROM A MAJOR FOUNDATION: TIPS FROM A PARKS NONPROFIT
http://www.pps.org/tthomas-2/
The following tips were summarized from a conversation with Thomas about the Prospect Park Alliance's $400,000 matching grant from the Kresge Foundation in Troy, Michigan, for restoration of Prospect Park's Woodlands area. The challenge requires the fundraising campaign to be completed on schedule; only then does the organization receive the Kresge grant. The Alliance's grant was unusual because Kresge usually supports the construction or improvement of buildings, not greenspace. From Urban Parks Online Fundraising Strategies web page.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WOMEN'S FUNDRAISING HANDBOOK
http://www.globalfundforwomen.org/storage/images/stories/downloads/fundraising_handbook.pdf
This handbook, written by Global Fund for Women staff, explores key ideas about raising money to fund women's rights work. It is especially designed for first-time fundraisers and for women's groups in developing countries. The handbook captures the essence of the Global Fund's Women, Money, and Empowerment workshops, which were given for activists at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995. Newly revised in 2007.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A FUNDING PROPOSAL
http://www.civicus.org/new/media/Writing%20a%20funding%20proposal.pdf
This toolkit deals with planning and researching a funding proposal before you write it; how to write the proposal; and the follow-up required once it is written and sent off. There is also an example of a funding proposal to guide you. You will find advice on what you need to know about donors, and what you need to know about your own project or organisation before you write a funding proposal. You will also find guidelines on what to put into your proposal and how to write it, and references to other CIVICUS toolkits that can help you. Courtesy of CIVICUS.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A FUNDRAISING PLAN
http://www.rivernetwork.org/resource-library/writing-fundraising-plan
Mary Ellen Olcese of the River Network gave this presentation at River Rally 2009 in Baltimore, Maryland, on May 30, 2009. The presentation covers: basic fundraising statistics, key elements for fundraising readiness, many different fundraising strategies, and factors that influence a successful fundraising plan.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A GOOD GRANT PROPOSAL
http://research.microsoft.com/Users/simonpj/papers/Proposal.html
We hope that this document will help you to write better grant proposals, and hence to be more successful in obtaining funds for your research. This article is not just about writing better grant proposals to obtain more money. The basic set-up of peer-reviewed grants of limited duration is a sensible one. It compels researchers regularly to review and re-justify the direction of their work. Behind poorly presented grant proposals often lie poorly-reasoned research plans. Perhaps if we can improve the quality of Computer Science proposals we will also improve the quality of Computer Science research. Advise from Simon Peyton Jones and Alan Bundy, Microsoft, for those writing computer science proposals.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.cpcwnc.org/Toolbox/writinggrants.html
Writing a grant proposal—like any big project—is easier when you break it down into steps. Helpful suggestions by Craig White and Paul Castelloe, Center for Participatory Change, on how to write and correctly structure a grant application.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A SUCCESSFUL GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.mcf.org/mcf/grant/writing.htm
Most funders want the same information, even if they use different words or ask questions in a different order. Some funders prefer that you fill out their own application forms or cover sheets. If the funder uses an application form, be sure to get a copy and follow the instructions. If the funder does not provide guidelines, use the following outline as a guide. The outline is for a project proposal, and is most appropriate for a project that is trying to correct a problem, such as water pollution, school truancy or ignorance about how HIV/AIDS is transmitted. The grant proposal as a whole, not including supplementary materials, should usually be five pages or less. Written by Barbara Davis for the Minnesota Council on Foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A WINNING GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.educationmoney.com/fed_write_proposal.html
EducationMoney.com offers advice on preparing a winning federal grant proposal.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING A WINNING GRANT PROPOSAL
https://web.archive.org/web/20081024025151/http://www.ictknowledgebase.org.uk/winninggrants
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING AN EFFECTIVE PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Internet Archive Link
Once you convincingly establish the need for grant funds, it is time to tell the reader what you plan to do about it. This is sometimes called "the method," "the methodology," or "the project description." It is as crucial to your success as the need statement. You can convince your audience that you have a compelling problem that requires attention; however, if the solution you offer is unworkable, you will not be funded. Practical advice by Karen Hodge, Grants and Foundations Review, Apr 15, 2003. Also available from Just Grants! Indiana. Note : link works best with Mozilla Firefox.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING KNOCKOUT PROPOSALS
http://www.guidestar.org/DisplayArticle.do?articleId=1068
Ours is the land of fundraising opportunity. Anyone, and everyone, can write a proposal. If you doubt it, visit a local foundation and behold the reviewer's desk, if it hasn't buckled under already. But precious few people can write a "knockout" proposal, a document of such force it catapults the funder down the hall. I exaggerate—but you get the point. To help you enhance your own proposals, here are three tips. Excerpt from How to Write Knockout Proposals: What You Must Know (and Say) to Win Funding Every Time.
Note: This web article also provides access to other Guidestar articles via the archives link.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING PROPOSALS FOR CAPACITY BUILDING
http://www.prolifica.org/uploads/Capacity%20Building%20Grants.pdf
Funders want to improve organizations -- not rescue them. Advice from Susan Chandler, The Grantsmanship Center.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING SUCCESSFUL GRANT APPLICATIONS
http://www.joe.org/joe/1990summer/tt3.html
Successfully competing for grants allows Extension educators to enhance their Extension programs. In some cases, grant money alone supports the program. Here are suggestions I've found useful in writing successful grant applications. David A. Philbrick, Extension Energy Program Leader and Initiatives Coordinato,r Oregon State University-Corvallis, Journal of Extension, Summer 1990, Volume 28, Number 2.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WRITING TIPS AND INFORMATION : HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLz7gYF1Mqs&feature=relmfu
Writing a grant proposal requires studying the request for proposals, offering detailed information about the proposed project and its benefit,s and calculating an accurate and detailed budget. Write a grant proposal with tips from a writing instructor, Laura Minnigerode, in this free video series on writing.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

WYOMING LIBRARY FOUNDATIONS
http://www-wsl.state.wy.us/slpub/foundations/index.html
This newsletter is introduced to provide ongoing information to the Wyoming county library foundations about the Public Library Endowment Challenge Program passed by the Legislature along with general information on endowments, fundraising and foundations.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

YAHOO'S PHILANTHROPY RESOURCES
http://www.yahoo.com/Society_and_Culture/Issues_and_Causes/Philanthropy/
Yahoo's typical collection of web links.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

YOU'VE GOT THE GRANT, NOW WHAT? POST-AWARD ADMINISTRATION AND THE GRANTS PROFESSIONAL
http://grantprofessionals.org/professional-development/journal/journal-articles-past-articles/77-gpa/256-you’ve-got-the-grant,-now-what-post-award-administration-and-the-grant-professional
What about after the grant? For those of us without an official “grants administrator,” how involved should the “grant writer” be with the program after the grant is awarded? While the right answer is different for everyone, I make a case below for staying out of program “operations,” while carefully educating program and accounting personnel regarding their responsibilities, and checking in at appropriate intervals to ensure all is going smoothly. Article by Cheryl Kester appearing in Grants and Foundations Review, March 9, 2005.
(Last checked 07/31/14)

ZEN IN THE ART OF GRANTSMANSHIP
(or, This Ain't About Money, It's About Attitude):
A GRANTSEEKER'S GUIDE
https://web.archive.org/web/20110408214547/http://www.mindspring.com/~bozartmt/zen_in.html
1996
(Last checked 07/31/14)


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