ODDS AND ENDS : ISSUE 97, MAY 2003

A Collection of Web Sites of Possible Interest to Government Documents Librarians

Table of Contents

Arab Human Development Report 2002
Barney Bio
Biodefense
Brush With History: Paintings from the National Portrait Gallery
2001 Canadian Census Guide
Castro Speech Data Base
Chicago Anarchists on Trial: Evidence from the Haymarket Affair, 1886-1887
Columbia Investigation Accident Board
CRS Reports on Congress and its Procedures
Dag Hammarskold Library Web Page on International Terrorism
DisabilityInfo.gov
Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Michigan (Executive Summary)
ERIC Digests Move
A Family Preparedness Guide (Michigan Homeland Security)
FDA : Antibiotic Resistance
Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Command Center
Governor Granholm's Constituent Services Office
GPO Access Re-Launched
Health Topics A to Z
Heroes of Yore and Lore: Canadian Heroes in Fact and Fiction
Hog Heaven : Celebrating One Hundred Years of Harley-Davidson
Hunt for Bin Laden
International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: Slobodan Milosevic Trial Transcripts
Internet Criminal History Access Tool, or ICHAT
Iraqi Playing Cards
Jefferson Muzzle Awards
Lewis & Clark and the Revealing of America
Lewis & Clark: the Maps of Exploration, 1507-1814
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
Map Michigan
Medical Errors and Patient Safety
Michigan Career Portal
Michigan County Estimates, Tables, and Maps (2002)
Michigan Homeland Security
Michigan Official Transportation Map
Michigan Wildlife Species
National Portrait Gallery: Women of Our Time
National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals
Protecting Michigan Gasoline Consumers
Ready.gov
Road Map to Peace?
Saratoga: The Tide Turns on the Frontier
Shaking Hands with Saddam Hussein
Social Security Online History Page
Tapestry of Time and Terrain
Terrorism and U.S. Policy
USA Patriot Act Cartoon
US Commission on Civil Rights - Historical Publications Archive
Virtual Coin Collecting (U.S. Mint)
Voice of America (VOA) Pronunciation Guide
Where's My Refund?
Will Duct Tape and Plastic Sheeting Really Work
Women of Our Time

Arab Human Development Report 2002
http://www.rbas.undp.org/ahdr2.cfm?menu=10
Note: The UNDP is no longer providing free online access. They want $10 for an electronic copy.
Written and researched by a team of regional experts (working under the auspices of the United Nations Development Programme), this 180-page report outlines the current state of human development and its future potential throughout the Arab world. The report begins by noting that Arab countries have made significant strides in more than one area of human development, although it also mentions that three significant deficits (freedom, empowerment of women, and knowledge) constitute "weighty constraints on human capability that must be lifted." While the full report is quite lengthy, it is divided into more digestible sections dealing with the overall state of human development in the region, the potential for building human capability, and cooperation among Arab states. The report also contains several appendices that offer detailed statistical information gathered by the researchers and a list of background papers. For those looking for a quick overview of their findings, the report also has an 11-page summary. Source: Scout Report, March 21, 2003.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

Barney Bio
http://www.whitehouse.gov/kids/barney/
You know about the rest of the Bush family, now get to know the first dog. Learn about Barney's biological parents and where he was born. Take a look at the White House through his eyes with the Barney Cam. Source: USA Today Hot Site, May 9, 2003.
(Last checked 05/12/03)

Biodefense: A Need for Public Understanding and the Critical Role of Science Teachers
http://science-education.nih.gov/WebPages.nsf/WebPages/Biodefense+Insert/$File/Biodefense+Section.pdf
In the light of the recent concerns over the threat and possibility of bioterrorism, the Office of Science Education at the National Institutes of Health has recently released this informative pamphlet (originally published in fall 2002) for teachers hoping to broaden the topic in the classroom. The publication itself gives teacher an opportunity to discuss how public health decisions are made, explain the role of vaccination in public health, and how to effectively address student concerns about bioterrorist attacks. Many of the pieces in the pamphlet were written by Robert Taylor, a science journalist and editor who taught high school chemistry before returning to take his PhD in chemistry from Georgetown University. Other pieces in the publication include an interview with Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infection Diseases and an extended piece about smallpox. Educators and the general public will find this 12-page publication informative, both in terms of providing substantive scientific information and in dispelling popular misconceptions about bioterrorism. Source: Scout Report, May 16, 2003.
(Last checked 05/19/03)

A Brush With History: Paintings from the National Portrait Gallery
http://web.archive.org/web/20031002011633/
http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/brush/index1.htm

Bad day? Had enough of your fellow man? The National Portrait Gallery invites you to spend some time instead with many who made America great with its exhibition A Brush with History. Portraits of icons as diverse as Benjamin Franklin, Edith Wharton and Michael Jackson are presented here, along with detailed biographies. Source: USA Today Hot Site, April 16, 2003.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

2001 Canadian Census Guide
http://www.library.carleton.ca/madgic/guides/census2001.htm
If you or your patrons have wondered how Canada compares to us in population, age and sex, language use and other areas, help is here. Check out the Carleton University Library (Ottawa, Canada) guide to finding 2001 Canadian Census. Source: GOVDOC-L, March 26, 2003.
(Last checked 03/27/03)

Castro Speech Data Base
http://lanic.utexas.edu/la/cb/cuba/castro.html
Data base containing the full text of English translations of speeches, interviews, and press conferences by Fidel Castro, based upon the records of the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), a U.S. government agency responsible for monitoring broadcast and print media in countries throughout the world. These records are in the public domain and cover the years 1959 to 1996. Contents of the data base, over 2,000 texts covering 37 years, can be searched or browsed. If you would like more recent speeches or texts in Spanish, please consult Discursos e Intervenciones de Fidel Castro, which has texts in a variety of languages starting with 1998.
(Last checked 04/01/03)

Chicago Anarchists on Trial: Evidence from the Haymarket Affair, 1886-1887
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ichihtml/hayhome.html
This collection showcases more than 3,800 images of original manuscripts, broadsides, photographs, prints and artifacts relating to the Haymarket Affair. The violent confrontation between Chicago police and labor protesters in 1886 proved to be a pivotal setback in the struggle for American workers' rights. From the Library of Congress American Memory digital collections.
(Last checked 04/03/03)

Columbia Investigation Accident Board
http://www.caib.us/
On Feb. 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia was lost during its return to Earth. Investigators now search for the cause...
(Last checked 03/29/03)

CRS Reports
Selected Congressional Research Service Reports on Congress and Its Procedures
http://www.llsdc.org/sourcebook/CRS-Congress.htm
This site includes some 36 alphabetically arranged CRS reports, most of which have never been made available on the Web. The site also links several other CRS reports on the Internet as well as proposed, current, and past federal legislation that mandates CRS reports be posted on the Internet. In addition, Law Librarians' Society of Washington, D.C., Inc. (LLSDC) Legislative Source Book includes two scanned CRS reports on presidential documents entitled, "Presidential Directives Background and Overview" and "Executive Orders and Proclamations". Source: NCC Washington Update, v. 9, no. 18, April 23, 2003.
(Last checked 04/30/03)

Dag Hammarskold Library Web Page on International Terrorism
http://www.un.org/Depts/dhl/resources/terrorism/index.html
The United Nations has long been active in the fight against international terrorism. Reflecting the determination of the international community to eliminate this threat, the Organization and its agencies have developed a wide range of international legal agreements that enable the international community to take action to suppress terrorism and bring those responsible to justice. Dating back to 1963, these agreements provide the basic legal tools to combat international terrorism in its many forms -- from the seizure of aircraft to hostage-taking to the financing of terrorism. Many have been ratified by the majority of countries around the world, and only the most recent one is not yet in force. Such agreements have been developed by the General Assembly, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the International Maritime Organization (IMO), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (Note to Correspondents 5679). The web page also provides links to UN publications, non-UN publications, and web sites.
(Last checked 03/21/03)

DisabilityInfo.gov
http://www.disabilityinfo.gov/
On August 28, 2002, President George W. Bush issued an executive memorandum as part of the New Freedom Initiative that directed all federal agencies to cooperate in building an interagency Web portal for people with disabilities, their families, employers, and the general public. As a result of this directive, DisabilityInfo.gov was developed to service these different groups. The site is divided into ten broad thematic areas, including housing, education, health, technology, and civil rights. Within each area, visitors can look through a number of press releases and links dealing with each area and, in many cases, specifically addressing the rights of the disabled. The site includes a search engine and, appropriately enough, is also available in several different versions, including a high-contrast version. Finally, the site also contains a number of federal grant opportunities for persons and organizations serving and working on behalf of the disabled. Formerly called Disabilty.gov (2000). Source: Scout Report, May 9, 2003.
(Last checked 05/19/03)

Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Michigan (Executive Summary)
http://www.michiganfitness.org/indexpagedownloads/CostofInactivity.pdf
Cost of physical inactivity in Michigan, $8.9 billion; cost to each Michigan adult, $1,175; quality of life resulting from regular physical activity, priceless. A study released May 23rd by the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports reports that physical inactivity in Michigan is costing $8.9 billion dollars a year including direct and indirect cost of medical care (including Medicaid), workers’ compensation and lost productivity. If current trends continue, it is expected that the cost of physical inactivity will increase by 42% to $12.65 billion by 2007.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

ERIC Digests Move
Link no longer working.
On January 21, 2003, the full text of the ERIC Digests became available at the ERIC Processing and Reference Facility at http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/index/. The Digests previously resided at http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/index/. The latter web page displays a notice forwarding users to the ERIC Facility's Digest site. The U.S. Department of Education is in the process of changing the links to reference the Facility's URL directly. Please remember to update your bookmarks. Source: Sheila McGarr, Executive Director, National Library of Education, GOVDCO-L, Jan. 23, 2003.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

A Family Preparedness Guide (Michigan Homeland Security)
http://www.michigan.gov/gov/0,1607,7-168-23526-25233--,00.html
Since the horrific events of September 11th, there are certain steps we must take to protect Michigan families for the known and unknown threats that may confront us. This Emergency and Family Preparedness Guide has been created to help you develop an emergency plan, provide information on how to assemble a Emergency Supply Kit, and provides specific contact telephone numbers and websites you can use for emergency assistance.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

FDA: Antibiotic Resistance
http://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/anti_resist.html
In the past few years, there have been more reports of bacteria that are increasingly resilient to antibiotics. Understandably, this antibiotic resistance is of great concern to the medical community in terms of public health, and is due largely to the increased use of antibiotics. With this in mind, the United States Food and Drug Administration has developed this Web site to inform the general public about this phenomenon, as well as to provide a number of documents generated by different government agencies about this problem and strategies for combating it. For those unacquainted with the situation, there are several helpful general fact sheets and overviews provided online from the Center for Disease Control and the University of Wisconsin. Additionally, the site contains several papers outlining some general recommendations about how the problem can be contained with the cooperation of doctors, hospitals, and increased awareness of the populace. Source: Scout Report, March 21, 2003.
(Last checked 05/20/03)

Federal Aviation Administration
Air Traffic Control Command Center
http://www.fly.faa.gov/flyFAA/index.html
Fly.FAA.gov allows you to track flight status conditions at your favorite local airports. If you are more interested in tracking particular flights, try Flight Tracker. For more information about your local airport, check out the Airnav.com database.
(Last checked 03/25/03)

Governor Granholm's Constituent Services Office
http://www.michigan.gov/gov/0,1607,7-168-35316---,00.html
The new Constituent Services office was officially opened on February 6, in a symbolic "red tape" ribbon cutting by Governor Jennifer M. Granholm. Constituent Services houses a staff that is available to work one on one with citizens who need help cutting through red tape and other problems relating to state government. The goal for this office is to allow government to be accessible and responsive to addressing citizens' needs. Constituents who would like to speak to a specialist for assistance should visit Constituent Services during regular business hours: 9 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday, or contact the office by calling (517) 335-7858. Constituent Services is located on the ground floor of the George W. Romney Building across from the Capitol.
(Last checked 04/11/06)

GPO Access Re-Launched
http://www.gpoaccess.gov
GPO Access was relaunched with a new URL and enhanced look and feel on April 4, 2003.
(Last checked 04/07/03)

Health Topics A to Z
http://www.cdc.gov/health/default.htm
Health Topics A to Z provides a listing of disease and health topics found on the CDC Web site. Everything from Acanthamoeba Infection to Zoster.
(Last checked 03/17/03)

Heroes of Yore and Lore: Canadian Heroes in Fact and Fiction
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/2/6/index-e.html
The heroes of our neighbors to the North gain some well-deserved recognition at the simple-yet-elegant Heroes of Yore and Lore Web site. Real-life personalities such as explorer Sir Alexander Mackenzie and naturalist Grey Owl rub elbows with fictional phenoms like Anne of Green Gables and Johnny Canuck. Courtesy of the National Library of Canada digitization project. Source: USA Today Hot Site, April 4, 2003.
(Last checked 05/12/03)

Hog Heaven : Celebrating One Hundred Years of Harley-Davidson
http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/harley100/
The Harley-Davidson motorcycle, one of the greatest symbols of America's rugged individualism since the bald eagle, celebrates its centennial this year, and the Library of Congress garners a sidecar's worth of street cred with this photo-packed online presentation: 'Hog Heaven.' Source: USA Today Hot Site, April 22, 2003.
(Last checked 05/12/03)

The Hunt for Bin Laden:
Background on the Role of Special Forces in U.S. Military Strategy
http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB63/
The latest phase of military operations in Afghanistan has shifted the emphasis from heavy bombing to more of a “boots on the ground” approach involving hundreds of U.S. special forces units with missions ranging from engaging Al-Qaeda fighters, to interrogating prisoners, guarding sensitive positions and, soon, possibly searching the Tora Bora caves.
Special forces have played a part in American military operations for more than 200 years. They place a premium on specialized skills, training and tactics in order to accomplish missions with “speed, stealth, audacity [and] deception” -- in ways that conventional forces are not suited for. They are particularly popular with political leaders because they generally cut a lower profile and run less risk of sustaining heavy casualties in politically sensitive circumstances. Recent situations involving special forces include Operations Just Cause (Panama), Desert Shield/Desert Storm (Iraq and Kuwait), and Joint Endeavor (Bosnia).
Although U.S. special forces have enjoyed significant successes, they have also suffered terrible catastrophes – as in the Iran hostage rescue attempt of 1980 and the disaster in Somalia in 1993. Nonetheless, they remain a key element in U.S. military strategy whose importance is likely to grow.
Given the current focus of the campaign in Afghanistan, the National Security Archive is posting a selection of materials from a variety of sources that give background on the structure, activities and experiences of U.S. special forces. The materials include a history of the inter-service Joint Special Operations Command, a recent posture statement on U.S. special operations forces, a joint Army-Air Force field manual describing guidelines for military operations in “low-intensity conflict,” a critique of the Army Ranger engagement in Somalia, and other documents describing particular missions and tools relevant to the ongoing deployment in Afghanistan. Volume VI: The September 11th Sourcebooks; National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 63; December 21, 2001.
(Last checked 03/21/03)

Internet Criminal History Access Tool, or ICHAT
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/BACKGROUND_CHECKS_96361_7.pdf
The Michigan State Police provides the Internet Criminal History Access Tool, or ICHAT, which allows you to instantaneously access the criminal history records of individuals who have been convicted of a crime in Michigan. ICHAT is an easy way to access this information, and is free to nonprofit charitable (the cost is $10.00 per request for for-profit businesses or individuals).
(Last checked 04/11/06)

Iraqi Playing Cards
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Apr2003/pipc10042003.html
Extra credit for you Jeapardy players if you can guess what's on the jokers in the special edition playing cards passed out by the U.S. military in Iraq listing the most wanted characters from the former Iraqi regime. Most of you can probably guess who's on the Ace of Spades.
(Last checked 04/11/03)

Jefferson Muzzle Awards
http://www.tjcenter.org/
Attorney General John D. Ashcroft, Congress and National Zoo Director Lucy H. Spelman are among 10 people and organizations named top stiflers of free speech in the 12th annual Jefferson Muzzle Awards handed out last week. The Thomas Jefferson Center For The Protection Of Free Expression issues the awards each year on Jefferson's birthday to draw national attention to "severe and unusual" threats to free speech and press.
(Last checked 04/29/03)

Lewis & Clark: the Maps of Exploration, 1507-1814
http://www.lib.virginia.edu/speccol/exhibits/lewis_clark/home.html
Another online exhibition (also see Lewis & Clark and the Revealing of America) courtesy of the University of Virginia Alderman Library.
(Last checked 03/13/03)

Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
http://www.lbjlib.utexas.edu/
Born in Stonewall, Texas in 1908, Lyndon Baines Johnson would later become president of the United States after the assassination of John F. Kennedy and oversee one of the most turbulent periods in recent American history. Located on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin, the Johnson Library and Museum was dedicated in 1971 and is part of the system of presidential libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. First-time visitors will want to tour the online research section, which contains a timeline of Johnson's life; information about Lady Bird Johnson; and quick facts about his presidential cabinet, religious affiliation, and favorite foods. The online primary documents are impressive, ranging from selected speeches given by Johnson during his administration, photographs, and most notably a number of oral histories. The oral histories are taken from dozens of his associates, fellow politicians, and friends, including Billy Graham and the late Senator Everett Dirksen. Visitors will also enjoy looking through the audio and video files, including conversations with Adam Clayton Powell, Thurgood Marshall, and Jacqueline Kennedy. The site is rounded out by a nice section especially aimed towards young people. Source: Scout Report, April 11, 2003.
(Last checked 05/19/03)

Map Michigan
http://www.mcgi.state.mi.us/mapmichigan/home.asp
Map Michigan welcomes you to search and explore various places and points of interest throughout our State. Looking for a certain address? Have a weekend destination in mind, but don’t know how to get there? The tools available on this site are designed to assist the public in meeting these and many other map-related needs.
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Medical Errors and Patient Safety
http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/errorsix.htm
The very critical issues of medical errors and patient safety have received a great deal of attention. In November 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a report estimating that as many as 98,000 patients die as the result of medical errors in hospitals each year. A major Federal initiative has been launched to reduce medical errors and improve patient safety in federally funded health care programs, and by example and partnership, in the private sector. Courtesy of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
(Last checked 03/14/03)

Michigan Career Portal
http://www.michigan.gov/careers
The Michigan Department of Career Development (MDCD) has launched a new online career and job information Web site, the Michigan Career Portal. This web site features online access to the Michigan Occupational Information System (MOIS), with its more than 400 complete MOISscripts, each providing comprehensive information on an occupation including education requirements, employment outlook, duties, wages, and links to other relevant resources.
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Michigan County Estimates, Tables, and Maps (2002)
http://www.michigan.gov/census/0,1607,7-162--66114--,00.html
New census county estimates are available courtesy of the Library of Michigan, Library Development and Data Services, State Data Center Program.
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Michigan Homeland Security
http://www.michigan.gov/msp/1,1607,7-123-1593_3507_8920---,00.html
A place to check for homeland security activities at the state government level.
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Michigan Official Transporation Map
http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,1607,7-151-9622_11033_11151---,00.html
The new 2003-2004 State Map is now available in locations throughout Michigan. Produced by MDOT and widely distributed free of charge through Travel Michigan Welcome Centers and MDOT offices, the new edition includes several upgrades: the first all-electronic map which can be updated instantaneously; new colors that are consistent with nationwide map standards; new bridge rates; new highways now complete; and a new symbol that indicates national forest recreation facilities.
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Michigan Wildlife Species
http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12145---,00.html
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources provides these web pages sorted out into the following categories: amphibians & reptiles; birds; crustaceans, fish, mussels, & clams; insects & spiders; mammals; and nuisance animals. Where else can you find out about the Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake (the only poisonous state native to Michigan), the sturgeon (the oldest and longest living fish), and the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (which likes to swarm and devour tasty leaves in your yard).
(Last checked 04/30/03)

National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals
http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/
The Report is the second in a series of publications that provide an ongoing assessment of the exposure of the U.S. population to environmental chemicals using biomonitoring. Biomonitoring is the assessment of human exposure to chemicals by measuring the chemicals or their metabolites in human specimens such as blood or urine. Courtesy of the National Center for Disease Control and Prevenction (CDC). The First Report is also available at http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/dls/report/index.htm.
(Last checked 03/17/03)

Protecting Michigan Gasoline Consumers
http://www.mda.state.mi.us/industry/lab/gas/index.html
Want to know how much gasoline costs at the pump in Michigan? This web site by the Michigan Department of Agriculture takes advantage of data from credit card payments made at gasoline stations around the state to provide consumers with comparative price information, either by city or zip code. It does not provide information on individual gas stations (darn!).
(Last checked 05/30/03)

Ready.gov
http://www.ready.gov/
The Department of Homeland Security has created this web page because "terrorism forces us to make a choice -- don't be afraid, be ready." Terrorists are working to obtain biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological weapons, and the threat of an attack is very real. Here at the Department of Homeland Security, throughout the federal government, and at organizations across America we are working hard to strengthen our Nation's security. Whenever possible, we want to stop terrorist attacks before they happen. All Americans should begin a process of learning about potential threats so we are better prepared to react during an attack. While there is no way to predict what will happen, or what your personal circumstances will be, there are simple things you can do now to prepare yourself and your loved ones. Provides tips on what to do in case of biological incidents, chemical incidents, explosions, nuclear blasts, or radiological threats.
(Last checked 03/20/03)

Rivers, Edens, and Empires:
Lewis & Clark and the Revealing of America
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/lewisandclark/lewisandclark.html
On April 7, 1805--the day the Lewis and Clark expedition left Fort Mandan for points west--Meriwether Lewis entered an intriguing, revealing note in his journal. Surveying the expedition's collection of canoes and pirogues, Lewis wrote: "This little fleet altho' not quite so rispectable as those of Columbus and Captain Cook were still viewed by us with as much pleasure as those deservedly famed adventurers ever beheld theirs." At that moment Lewis had a sense of history--the history of geographic exploration and his own place in the story. As Columbus had sailed the Atlantic and Cook charted the Pacific, Lewis now imagined he would represent the exploration of the American West. Like so many other exploration stories, the Lewis and Clark journey was shaped by the search for navigable rivers, inspired by the quest for Edens, and driven by competition for empire. Thomas Jefferson was motivated by these aspirations when he drafted instructions for his explorers, sending them up the Missouri River in search of a passage to the Pacific. Writing to William Dunbar just a month after Lewis and Clark left Fort Mandan, Jefferson emphasized the importance of rivers in his plan for western exploration and national expansion. "We shall delineate with correctness the great arteries of this great country." River highways could take Americans into an Eden, Jefferson's vision of the West as the "Garden of the World." And those same rivers might be nature's outlines and borders for empire. "Future generations would," so the president told his friend, "fill up the canvas we begin." Rivers flowed into Edens, and Edens would become empires. Visit this online exhibtion sponsored by the Library of Congress.
(Last checked 03/13/03)

Road Map to Peace?
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2003/20062.htm
The U.S. Department of State has released "A Performance-Based Roadmap to a Permanent Two-State Solution to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict".
(Last checked 05/28/03)

Saratoga: The Tide Turns on the Frontier
http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/93saratoga/93saratoga.htm
The National Park Service provides this web site examining the battle considered the "turning point in the American Revolution." Saratoga demonstrated to France that the ragtag Continental Army could win against Britain's better trained, disciplined troops. The victory at Saratoga turned the American Revolution into a global war. For additional web pages describing national parks and historic landmarks, visit Teaching with Historic Places.
(Last checked 03/21/03)

Shaking Hands with Saddam Hussein: The U.S. Tilts toward Iraq, 1980-1984
http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB82/index.htm
National Security Archive Briefing Book No. 82, Feb. 25, 2003, full of U.S. government documents about this period of our relations with Iraq.
(Last checked 05/28/03)

Social Security Online History Page
http://www.ssa.gov/history/
The creation of the Social Security program during the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt is widely understood to be one of the most important pieces of social welfare legislation in United States history. Drawing on their vast repositories of oral histories, audio recordings, and primary documents, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has established this Web site that will be of great help and assistance to researchers looking for a holistic appraisal of the Administration's historical development and contributions to the welfare of the American public. Visitors will want to check out the detailed explanation of how Social Security numbers are assigned (and who received the first number back in 1936). One fascinating feature is the sound and video clip section, which features radio debates on the merits of the Social Security program taped during 1935 and Lyndon B. Johnson's remarks on the passage of the Medicare bill in 1965. The Web site also includes transcriptions of oral histories done with administrators of the SSA over the past 65 years. All in all, this site serves as a well-thought out archive that deals with the transformation of the federal government's role in increasing its influence in the arena of social welfare. Source: Scout Report, March 28, 2003.
(Last checked 05/20/03)

Tapestry of Time and Terrain
http://tapestry.usgs.gov/
This helpful teaching tool from the United States Geological Survey brings together the comprehensive geological and topographical maps of the United States. As the site suggests, "... this digital tapestry outlines the geologic story of continental collision and break-up, mountain-building, river erosion and deposition, ice-cap glaciation, volcanism, and other events and processes that have shaped the region over the last 2.6 billion years." First-time users will want to watch the Quick-Time film that shows the merging of the two maps, along with a brief description of how each individual map portrays the United States. Within the features description section of the site, visitors can interact with a clickable map surface that details the prominent features of the United States, such as the Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin and the Olympic Peninsula in the state of Washington. Equally helpful for learning about geologic time is the interactive map legend that allows users to learn about the different eras, like the Paleozoic or the Precambrian. For people who are looking to learn more about geology, this Web site will be one they will want to peruse several times. Source: Scout Report, April 18, 2003.
(Last checked 05/19/03)

Terrorism and U.S. Policy
http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB55/index1.html
The first volume contains the documents that our staff experts, led by Dr. Jeffrey Richelson and coordinated by Michael Evans, have selected as the most important available primary sources on U.S. terrorism policy. These materials include CIA biographic sketches of Usama Bin Laden and Taliban leader Mohammad Omar, reports from the Pentagon and the Senate Intelligence Committee on previous terrorist attacks on the USS Cole and the Khobar Towers, the State Department’s overview of global terrorism and the FBI’s review of terrorism in the U.S. We have included several of the most relevant Congressional Research Service briefs, six of the General Accounting Office’s most recent reports on combating terrorism, plus the key policy directives on terrorism from the Pentagon and from Presidents Reagan and Clinton. Volume 1: The September 11th Sourcebooks; National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 55; edited by Jeffrey Richelson and Michael L. Evans. September 21, 2001.
(Last checked 03/21/03)

International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Transcripts of the Trial of Slobodan Milosevic
http://www.un.org/icty/transe54/transe54.htm
Academic libraries that subscribe to Congressional Digest's International Debates can find more information on this topic in the May 2003, Vol. 1, No. 5 issue.
(Last checked 05/28/03)

USA Patriot Act Cartoon
http://www.danzigercartoons.com/cmp/2002/danziger1363.html
The FBI Now Empowered to Seize Library Records! Marianne is not cooperating... Cartoon by Jeff Danziger, Los Angeles Times.
(Last checked 03/17/03)

U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
Historical Publications
http://www.law.umaryland.edu/edocs/usccr/html%20files/usccrhp.asp
Since its inception in 1957 the United States Commission on Civil Rights has been at the forefront of efforts by the Federal government and state governments to examine and resolve issues related to race, ethnicity, religion and, more recently, sexual orientation. Although the fortunes of the Commission have ebbed and flowed with changes in Presidential administrations the Commission has continued to be a vital part of the effort to build an America that is truly equal. By providing access to the historical record of this important Federal Agency the Thurgood Marshall Law Library will offer scholars an opportunity to examine the efforts of the Commission more closely. Reports in the archive cover a range of issues from Title IX implementation, immigration, employment, migrant workers (this includes a wonderful photo-essay prepared for the commission - People Who Follow the Crops), access to health insurance, access to mortgage lending and the civil rights record of President Clinton. All files are available in a searchable PDF format.
(Last checked 03/18/03)

Virtual Coin Collecting : U.S. Mint Pressroom
http://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?flash=yes&action=Photo
Become a virtual coin collector, courtesy of the U.S. Mint. You'll find high-resolution images — ready for downloading — of 50 state quarters, Olympics commemoratives, golden dollars and even something called the Platinum Bullion. Source: USA Today Hot Site, May 2, 2003.
(Last checked 05/12/03)

Voice of America (VOA) Pronunciation Guide
http://ibb7.ibb.gov/pronunciations/
Find out how to pronounce Pir Sayed Ahmadgailani, Milorad Drljevic, and more from the Voice of America (VOA) guide to pronouncing names. Search or browse by name or country of origin.
(Last checked 04/03/03)

Where's My Refund?
http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=96596,00.html
"You filed your [United States federal] tax return and you're expecting a refund. You have just one question and you want the answer now — Where's My Refund? Access this secure Web site to find out if the IRS received your return and whether your refund was processed and sent to you."
(Last checked 04/07/03)

Will Duct Tape and Plastic Sheeting Really Work?
Issues Related to Expedient Shelter-in-Place
http://emc.ed.ornl.gov/EMCWeb/EMC/PDF/TM_2001_154_duct_plastic.pdf
Prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Federal Emergency Management Agency Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program, August 2001.
(Last checked 01/06/04)

Women of Our Time
http://www.npg.si.edu/cexh/woot/index.htm
This lovely little exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery shows off about three dozen portraits of prominent American women from the 20th century. In the main Gallery, scroll through thumbnail portraits such as Julia Child shopping in an Italian market in Boston in the 1970s, Marilyn Monroe entertaining troops in Korea in 1954, or Maya Lin talking to a black cat in her New York City apartment. Larger views and information about the women depicted, as well as the settings of the photographs, are available by clicking any thumbnail. There are two "sidebar" sections: Biographical Moments and Styles, where visitors can watch and listen (or read a transcript) of curator Frederick Voss's illustrated lecture on the ways these portraits help us understand their subjects' lives, and the evolution of styles in portrait photography. Source: Scout Report, March 28, 2003.
(Last checked 05/20/03)

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