ODDS AND ENDS : ISSUE 99, SEPTEMBER 2003

A Collection of Web Sites of Possible Interest to Government Documents Librarians

Table of Contents

America's Career InfoNet
Back to School: Census Bureau Facts and Figures
Beginner's Guide to Model Rockets
Canado-American Treaties
Cancer.gov Research Funding
Chartbook of International Labor Comparisons: United States, Europe, and Asia
Cheney Energy Task Force Documents
Child Labor International Report, 2002
A Chronology of U.S. Historical Documents
Citizenship Laws of the World
Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report
Condition of Education, 2000-2003
Deep Impact
Detroit, Michigan: A National Register
of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
Directory of Michigan Libraries, 2003-2004
Endangered Species Act of 1973
Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government (Official)
Environmental Justice Geographic Assessment Tool
FAO Forestry
FED 101
Federal Press Release Gateway
Federal Resource Guide for Supporting State International Engagement
Federal Telephone Directories
Federal Toll-Free Telephone Numbers
Founders' Constitution
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) of the U.S. Government
From Carbons to Computers: The Changing American Office
Giant Panda Pregnancy Watch at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park
Global Youth Tobacco Survey
Government Guide
Government Views of Iraq
GovInfo: Government on the Web
Historical Anatomies on the Web
Historical Hurricane Tracks
Human Cloning and Human Dignity: An Ethical Inquiry
Images from the History of the Public Health Service
Imagers: NASA Science Education for Elementary and Middle School
International Monetary Fund
Joint Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities
before and after the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001
LifeWorks: Health and Medical Science Career Info
MERLN Military Policy Awareness Links (MiPAL)
Michigan Giving and Volunteering, 2002
National Energy Policy Plan
National Hurricane Center
National Priorities Project
Nationalism, Sectarianism, and the Future of the U.S. Presence in Post-Saddam Iraq
Politics and Science: Investigating the Bush Administration's
Promotion of Ideology Over Science
Preserving Life and Liberty (U.S. Patriot Act)
President's Council on Bioethics
Rosie Pictures: Select Images Relating to American Women Workers During World War II
School Bus Safety
September 11 Digital Archive
SmithsonianEducation.org
State of the Great Lakes: 2002 Annual Report
Top Ten List for New Documents Librarians
Trust and Terror: New Demands for Crisis Information Dissemination and Management
U.S. Department of Labor's 2002 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor
U.S. Government Photos and Graphics
U.S. Power Grids
U.S. Senate Salary Ledger, 1790-1881
Window to My Environment
World Factbook, 2003

America's Career InfoNet
http://www.acinet.org/acinet/
The US Department of Labor's America's Career InfoNet is a component of CareerOneStop, an extensive federal- and state-sponsored career site portal providing access to job banks, employment service providers, and career education. InfoNet features career education information through federal, state, and private links to wage and employment trends; occupational requirements; a vast number of employer contacts nationwide; state-by-state labor market conditions; and a career resource library with more than 5,000 links to job banks, occupational information, relocation information, and job search aids. Navigation is fast and easy through the home page, which is organized in five sections. The Career Information section provides links to job market trends, skills inventories and tests, state demographic and economic information, and customized reports that put the Department of Labor's most popular sites in one document. The Career Videos section features almost 300 clips of occupations showing real people doing real work. The Career Tools section provides links on how to determine employability, write job descriptions, locate employers, find resources for training, and find private sector job search companies. Another section provides a site map, a toll-free help line, and a keyword search option. Finally, a Career Spotlight section features a photo and links about particular fast-growing occupations. InfoNet is designed to be viewed with an 800 x 600 screen area and requires printer settings to be changed from portrait to landscape orientation. Updated daily, this site has received numerous awards for creativity, integrity, and best practices in e-government. Though private-sector sites such as Monster (http://www.monster.com) have more industry-specific detail and customized services available using employment experts, InfoNet is the most comprehensive career site. It is an ideal resource for job seekers, employers, human resource specialists, and workforce development specialists. -- G. E. Kaupins, Boise State University, Choice, March 2003.
(Last checked 08/29/03)

Back to School: Census Bureau Facts and Figures
http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2003/cb03ff-11.html
So, how many students will be returning to school in the next couple of weeks? How many students are home-schooled now? How many college degrees will be awarded to graduating students after the spring 2004 semester? You can find these, and more, questions answered from this fact site produced by the Census Bureau. Source: El Dorado County Library, What's Hot, August 18, 2003
(Last checked 09/15/03)

Beginner's Guide to Model Rockets
http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/bgmr.html
At this Web site you can study how model rockets operate at your own pace and to your own level of interest. Because the flight of the rocket involves the interaction of forces on the rocket, we have included several pages on the fundamentals of forces. Because aerodynamics is involved with the motion of the rocket, there are several pages devoted to basic gas properties and aerodynamic forces. There is a short index of topics that you can access from any page, so you are never more than two clicks away from any other Web page at this site. This site was prepared at NASA Glenn by the Learning Technologies Project (LTP) (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12) to provide background information on model rockets as teaching aids for math and science teachers. Some of the slides were prepared to support RocketModeler, an interactive educational computer program that allows students to design and test rocket designs on a personal computer. Other slides were prepared to support LTP videoconferencing workshops for teachers and students. RocketModeler is available as a JAVA Applet that runs in your browser. This program can also be downloaded to your machine.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Canado-American Treaties
http://www.lexum.umontreal.ca/ca_us/index_en.html
This Web site provide free access to the text of all bilateral treaties established between the United States of America and Canada from 1783 to 1997. This site is the result of the cooperation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, (Government of Canada) the Library of International Relations (Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology), and the LexUM (Centre de recherche en droit public, Faculté de droit, Université de Montréal).
(Last checked 08/25/03)

Cancer.gov Research Funding
http://cancer.gov/researchfunding/
A portal to cancer research funding information provided by the National Cancer Institute.
(Last checked 09/03/03)

Chartbook of International Labor Comparisons: United States, Europe, and Asia
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/oiea/chartbook/
The global economy is now a reality. In this environment, standing still means falling behind. How can countries avoid this? Building a knowledgeable and skilled workforce is key to economic growth, increased productivity, and social progress.... This chartbook (May 2003) provides comparable information that can be used to assess United States (U.S.) economic and labor performance relative to other countries and to evaluate the competitive position of the U.S. in international trade." Source: El Dorado County Library, What's Hot, August 4, 2003
(Last checked 09/15/03)

Cheney Energy Task Force Documents Feature Map of Iraqi Oilfields
http://judicialwatch.org/071703.b_PR.shtml
Judicial Watch, the public interest group that investigates and prosecutes government corruption and abuse, said today that documents turned over by the Commerce Department, under court order as a result of Judicial Watch’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit concerning the activities of the Cheney Energy Task Force, contain a map of Iraqi oilfields, pipelines, refineries and terminals, as well as 2 charts detailing Iraqi oil and gas projects, and “Foreign Suitors for Iraqi Oilfield Contracts.” The documents, which are dated March 2001, are available on the the Judicial Watch web page at http://www.JudicialWatch.org. Source: Judicial Watch, July 17, 2003.
(Last checked 07/21/03)

A Chronology of U.S. Historical Documents
http://www.law.ou.edu/hist/
A compilation of full-text documents from the Magna Carta down to President George W. Bush's 2003 State of the Union Address, provided by the University of Oklahoma College of Law.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Citizenship Laws of the World
http://www.opm.gov/extra/investigate/IS-01.pdf
A quick reference document by the United States Office of Personnel Management (PM 1.2:2003016860), summarizing the citizenship laws of foreign nations and providing contact information. 2001.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report
http://www.caib.us/news/report/default.html
While a piece of insulating foam caused the actual explosion, the independent 13-member Columbia Accident Investigation Board cited complacency, poor communication, a rush to meet self-imposed deadlines and other organizational problems at the agency dating as far back as the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in 1986 also played a role in the Columbia disaster. "These repeating patterns mean that flawed practices embedded in NASA's organizational system continued for 20 years and made substantial contributions to both accidents." Vol. 1, August. 2003.
(Last checked 08/27/03)

Condition of Education, 2000-2003
http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/
This web site provided by the National Center for Education Statistics is an integrated collection of the indicators and analyses published in The Condition of Education 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003. Some indicators may have been updated since they appeared in print.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Deep Impact
http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/
Armageddon : It Ain't. In 2005, NASA scientists will crash a spaceship into a comet in order to study the effect of the impact and to provide "first-ever views deep beneath a comet's surface." Find background information, news, a mission timeline, general information about comets and comet missions, and technological details of the flight system. Includes educational materials and activities for children. Searchable. From the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Source: Librarians' Index to the Internet.
(Last checked 09/05/03)

Detroit, Michigan: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/detroit/index.htm
This web page provided by the National Park Service exhibits residential, recreational, commercial, industrial, and religious locations to create an online tour of the city. The itinerary features 39 properties in the National Register of Historic Places. Through maps, descriptions, and photographs of places both famous and little-known, this guide explains why Detroit has long been more than just a Motor City.
(Last checked 09/05/03)

Directory of Michigan Libraries, 2003-2004
http://www.michigan.gov/hal/0,1607,7-160-18835_18891---,00.html
Due to budget cuts, this year's directory is only available online as a pdf document. In case you don't want to print out the entire directory, you can choose which section you want for printing. For example, you can choose Michigan Documents Depository Libraries or Federal Documents Depository Libraries. (Federal documents librarians may prefer the Web version which includes the date the depository library was designated.) An Interactive Library Directory with the latest updates is another possible choice.
(Last checked 08/25/03)

The Endangered Species Act of 1973
http://endangered.fws.gov/esa.html
Frequently under attack by developers, private home owners, ranchers and certain political groups, the Endangered Species Act of 1973 is now 30 years old. Originally adopted and signed into law during the Nixon administration, the Act, which was originally seen as bringing the U.S. into the forefront of good environmental policy, is now seen as anti-development and anti-human in its scope. Well, what does the Act actually say? Is it good for the country (and the world) to have a protectionist policy for the various animals, fish and wildlife that inhabit the U.S.? This site, from the Fish and Wildlife Service, provides an online reprinting of the complete text for the Act and you can read it yourself to see if our agree with its provisions. Source: El Dorado County Library, What's Hot, August 4, 2003
(Last checked 09/15/03)

Environmental Justice Geographic Assessment Tool
http://www.epa.gov/enviro/ej/
This new tool replaces the EnviroJustice Mapper with new features and new technology. It is the result of an Agency-wide work group and provides information relevant to any area in the Continental U.S. Factors relevant to environmental justice assessments generally fall into four sets of indicators, i.e., environmental, health, social, and economic. The conditions these indicators seek to illuminate include, but are not limited to: adverse health or environmental impacts, aggregate or cumulative impacts, unique exposure pathways, vulnerable or susceptible populations, or lack of capacity to participate in decision making process. As these data become available, they may be incorporated into the Environmental Justice Geographic Assessment Tool, which when fully developed will provide the information necessary to conduct a comprehensive preliminary analysis of any area of concern. Use of buffers is incorporated into the Environmental Justice Geographic Assessment Tool; population estimation is accomplished through the area-weighted methodology. The smallest unit of geographic resolution is the census block. This Environmental Justice Geographic Assessment Tool is meant to serve as a module to be incorporated on the front end (e.g., screening) of all appropriate Agency assessments. For more information contact Sheila Lewis (lewis.sheila@epa.gov).
(Last checked 08/27/03)

FAO Forestry
http://www.fao.org/forestry/index.jsp
This Internet resource presents information on the FAO Forestry Department, which exists to "promote national and international action for the effective conservation, sustainable management and efficient utilization of forest and related resources as an integral element of land use systems." One of the main areas of activity is collection, analysis, processing, and dissemination of information on all aspects of forestry to assist FAO member countries in formulating policies and plan investments for development, maintenance, and sustainable use of their forests and related resources to meet evolving demands at local, national, and global levels. This Web site is an integral part of that activity. The content is obviously reliable, considering FAO's long history as an organization of the UN. The site is well organized, very informative, and logically presented with topics treated first broadly and then in a more refined manner as the user navigates deeper. Major sections include an events page highlighting meetings and events of international importance; a country section containing forest and forestry information for many of the world's countries; and access to the current issue of Unasylva, an international quarterly journal of forestry and forest industries. Source: Choice, April 2003.?
(Last checked 09/17/03)

FED 101
http://www.kc.frb.org/fed101/index.cfm
Learning Federal Reserve facts can be fun with Fed101. This interactive site teaches you about finance with a minimum of pain; you’ll be a Fed whiz after these simple lessons about banking history, monetary policy and today’s banking system. And you’ll really be the life the party when you tell your friends what happens to their checks after they write them. Source: USA Today Hot Site, August 14, 2003.
(Last checked 09/08/03)

Federal Press Release Gateway
http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call/pressreleases.htm
A portal provided by the Federal Citizen Information Center, National Contact Center.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Federal Resource Guide for Supporting State International Engagement: Coping, Competing, and Cooperating in the Global Economy
http://www.usaep.org/downloads/FederalGuide.pdf
Increased interest in international trade and development inspired the U.S. Agency for International Development to commission, for the first time ever, a specifically tailored publication to help states, local governments, non-government organizations, businesses, academia, and individuals further their international interests. 2002. 194pp.
(Last checked 07/28/03)

Federal Telephone Directories
http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call/phone.htm
A portal provided by the Federal Citizen Information Center, National Contact Center.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Federal Toll-Free Telephone Numbers
http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call/toll-free.htm
A portal provided by the Federal Citizen Information Center, National Contact Center.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Founders' Constitution
http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/
This Web Edition, an anthology on writings of founders of the government from the early seventeenth century to the 1830s, is a joint venture of the University of Chicago Press and the Liberty Fund. Government documents librarians may want to add this electronic resource to their library's holdings.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) of the U.S. Government
http://www.firstgov.gov/Contact/Faq.shtml
A compilation by FirstGov, by topic or department/agency.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

From Carbons to Computers: The Changing American Office
http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/lesson_plans/carbons/start.html
An educational resource intended for middle and high schools students, their teachers, and the general public" about the birth and growth of the American office. The site features a timeline and illustrated essays about office equipment, office organization, and the global office. Also includes lesson plans and a bibliography. From the Smithsonian Institution. Source: Librarians' Index to the Internet.
(Last checked 09/17/03)

Giant Panda Pregnancy Watch at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park
http://natzoo.si.edu/Animals/GiantPandas/PandaConservation/2003PregnancyWatch/
Ever since giant pandas Mei Xiang and Tian Tian mated on April 4, everyone at the National Zoo—-along with many others in the Washington, D.C., area and around the world—have been waiting anxiously to know whether Mei Xiang became pregnant.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Global Youth Tobacco Survey
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/global/GYTS.htm
WHO and CDC developed the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) to track tobacco use among youth across countries. The site features country reports, fact sheets, and the NEW GYTS Geographic Information System.
(Last checked 09/04/03)

GovInfo: Government on the Web
http://toby.library.ubc.ca/govinfo/govinfo.cfm
A searchable database of over 700 web links (and growing) courtesy of the University of British Columbia Library, designed to help researchers locate valuable government web resources. We have captured homepages, topic-specific sites within sites, individual e-documents, statistical sites and more. Text descriptions are included in records, which are title and keyword searchable. Primarily covers Canadian sources, but there is a fairly large number of U.S. government sources posted as well.
(Last checked 08/25/03)

Government Guide: Government Services Made Easy
http://www.governmentguide.com/main.adp
AOL's Portal to Government Information and Services. Covers developments both at the state and federal level.
(Last checked 08/21/03)

Government Views of Iraq
http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/library/Divisions/Government/Iraqbib.html
Iraq has been front-page news for months and here are some online primary resources to help fill in the background. This site concentrates on Government documents and information and while the bulk of the resources are from the United States, there are international entries as well. Resources include such items as U.S. Congressional Hearings and Resolutions, Federal Agency reports, transcripts of press conferences and briefings, USAID Fact Sheets, legislation, news releases and Presidential Communications, as well as texts of United Nations Security Council Resolutions, the Geneva Conventions and Protcols and selected international treaties. An interesting compilation by Grace-Ellen McCrann, City College of New York Cohen Library, Government Documents Division, June 30, 2003.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Historical Anatomies on the Web
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/historicalanatomies/intro.html
A National Library of Medicine digital project designed to give Internet users access to high quality images from important anatomical atlases in the Library's collection. The project offers selected images from NLM's atlas collection, not the entire books, with an emphasis on images and not texts. Atlases and images are selected primarily for their historical and artistic significance, with priority placed upon the earliest and/or the best edition of a work in NLM's possession.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

Historical Hurricane Tracks
http://hurricane.csc.noaa.gov/hurricanes/index.htm
From the site, The Historical Hurricane Tracks tool is an interactive mapping application that allows you to easily search and display 150 years of Atlantic Basin tropical cyclone data. A "Storms Report" and a "Costal Population" database are also listed on the page. The Storms Report dbase contains info on events from 1958 to 2001. Courtesy of NOAA. Source: Gary Price, ResourceShelf, August 14, 2003.
(Last checked 09/04/03)

Human Cloning and Human Dignity: An Ethical Inquiry
http://www.bioethics.gov/reports/cloningreport/index.html
This Council report offers an examination of the scientific, ethical and social issues raised by the prospect of human cloning, and a series of recommendations for policy. Report by The President's Council on Bioethics, Washington, D.C., July 2002. (Note: URL has changed since first reported in January 2003.)
(Last checked 08/29/03)

Images from the History of the Public Health Service
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/phs_history/contents.html
This exhibit is an online version of Images from the History of the Public Health Service; A Photographic Exhibit by Ramunas Kondratas, Ph.D. printed in 1994 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Public Health Service. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.
(Last checked 08/08/03)

Imagers: NASA Science Education for Elementary and Middle School
http://imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/
The IMAGERS (Interactive Multimedia Adventures for Grade School Education Using Remote Sensing) Program is NASA¹s comprehensive earth science education resource for the introduction of remote sensing and satellite imagery to children in grades K-8. The IMAGERS Program is comprised of two multimedia web sites: "Adventures of Amelia the Pigeon" and "Adventures of Echo the Bat". The Program¹s objective is to captivate children at an early age in Earth science through multimedia adventures. "Echo the Bat" and "Amelia the Pigeon" encompass two major components: (1) an interactive web site with a multimedia adventure game; and (2) an activity guide with lesson plans and reproducible hands-on activities. The interactive web sites are meant to engage children, while the supplemental materials enable educators to introduce the concepts through hands-on activities in the classroom. Applying this methodology, parents and teachers are able to teach Earth science using remote sensing imagery via identification of land use, exploration of featured habitats, and changes in the environment.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

International Monetary Fund
http://www.imf.org/
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) site contains an incredible amount of information about the organization, international monetary cooperation, and member countries. The home page contains current news, and the left tool bar provides links to the main topics. Although navigation may be a little confusing, the site is well organized and content is excellent. An extremely useful site search at the top of the page helps with navigation. The IMF at Work section describes in detail the three types of services the organization provides. This section also provides a link to IMF research and statistics. Available in PDF, Excel, or HTML format, the statistics download quickly and are easy to use; some tables allow manipulation of data. The IMF Finances section provides information on how the IMF gets and lends its money and contains monthly and quarterly statistics on IMF financial transactions, disbursements, repayments, and the financial position of individual member countries. The Country Information section provides an alphabetical directory with information on member countries' relations with the organization. Information on the latest IMF policies and activities can be found in the News Releases section, which provides links to speeches, meetings, etc., archived back to 1995. The most useful section is Publications, which provides free access to most IMF publications. Users can search for IMF publications by title, author, and subject and can narrow the search by date, language, and series. Publications include IMF staff papers, country reports, and working papers. Users also have access to recent titles (publications issued in the last three months), reports and newsletters, and works in progress. IMF publications are available for purchase by linking to the IMF catalog. Recommended for undergraduate and graduate students, researchers, and faculty in economics, international business, management, and finance. -- J. C. Tucker, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Choice Review, Feb. 2003
(Last checked 09/10/03)

Joint Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities before and after the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/serialset/creports/911.html
This Congressional report provides a scathing critique of the performance of the F.B.I. and C.I.A. before the September 2001 terrorist attacks and recommended several changes, including the creation of cabinet level national intelligence chief, that go beyond what the administration has proposed. The report, by a joint panel of the House and Senate intelligence committees, found that the F.B.I. and C.I.A. had failed to heed repeated warnings that al Qaeda intended to strike in the United States. It referred to one newly disclosed intelligence document from December 1998 that said: "Plans to hijack U.S. aircraft proceeding well. Two individuals had successfully evaded checkpoints in dry run at NY airport." The report concluded that in the months before the hijackings, the F.B.I. and C.I.A. did not comprehend the gravity and imminent nature of the threat inside the United States and failed to assess all of the available information about the risk of an attack. As a result, the report said, the agencies missed opportunities that would have "greatly enhanced" the chances of disrupting the terrorist plot.
(Last checked 07/24/03)

LifeWorks
http://science-education.nih.gov/LifeWorks.nsf/index.htm
Explore over 100 health and medical science careers courtesy of this web page provided by the National Institutes of Health Office of Science Education.
(Last checked 07/30/03)

MERLN Military Policy Awareness Links (MiPAL)
http://merln.ndu.edu/mipal/mipalhome.html
MERLN is not the online catalog of the University of Michigan, but rather the Military Education and Research Portal for the U.S. armed forces. Despite its military focus, MERLN's public resources are free for all to use without restriction. To assist our country's military policy planners, MERLN offers a collection of Military Policy Awareness Links (MiPAL) as a current awareness service. Compiled and maintained by the National Defense University Library, the current awareness resources may also be of interest to government documents librarians, particularly those working in college and university libraries. Current topics include:

  • Afghanistan
  • Iran
  • Homeland Security
  • National Security Strategy
  • North Korea
  • Syria
  • Terrorism
  • Transformation
  • U.S. Policy on Iraq
  • Weapons of Mass Destruction
    (Last checked 07/30/03)

    Michigan Giving and Volunteering, 2002
    http://www.michigan.gov/mcsc/0,1607,7-137-6118-65343--,00.html
    In October/November 2002, 989 Michigan residents were surveyed about their charitable giving, volunteering, and attitude toward nonprofit action. The survey was conducted by the Office of Survey Research, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research at Michigan State University. The survey was sponsored by ConnectMichigan Alliance, Council of Michigan Foundations, Michigan Community Service Commission, and Michigan Nonprofit Association. This web page by the Michigan Community Service Commission provides a link to the 2002 report. Earlier reports are also available.
    (Last checked 09/17/03)

    National Energy Policy Plan
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/energy/
    Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America's Future. "America must have an energy policy that plans for the future, but meets the needs of today. I believe we can develop our natural resources and protect our environment." George W. Bush.
    (Last checked 09/10/03)

    National Hurricane Center
    Tropical Prediction Center
    http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/
    For the latest postings about Hurricane Isabel and other developments, check this web page.
    (Last checked 09/17/03)

    National Priorities Project
    http://www.nationalpriorities.org/
    Focuses on the impact of federal budgetary policies and decisions on states and communities, with a mission "to make information accessible to people working for social and economic justice." NPP's main work of late is examining the trade-offs between military and social spending. The NPP Database, the most useful resource on this site for libraries, offers state data on socioeconomic needs and federal expenditures, largely taken from federal statistics sources, and allows users to create customized tables, graphs, and reports. Data are currently available on income and poverty, housing, hunger, health, labor, education, and military spending. Other topic areas are anticipated. Basic demographic data are also provided. The vast majority of data comes from federal statistical publications and other well-known resources. State level data are currently available, with plans to provide county and local data in future. The compilers provide good information about the sources of data for each data set, along with reports on any irregularities in the data, in a separate link provided with the search results. Source: Choice, April 2003.
    (Last checked 08/29/03)

    Nationalism, Sectarianism, and the Future of the U.S. Presence in Post-Saddam Iraq
    http://www.carlisle.army.mil/ssi/pubs/2003/postsadm/postsadm.pdf
    Practical advice for the occupation troops in Iraq by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill, Army War College. (D 101.146:2003017922)
    (Last checked 07/30/03)

    Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government
    http://www.eia.doe.gov/
    How do you want to access energy information? By geography? By fuel? By sector? By price? Or would you like to access specific subject areas? Process, environment, forecasts, or analyses. Many other options are available as well. Courtesy of the Energy Information Administration.
    (Last checked 09/10/03)

    Politics and Science: Investigating the Bush Administration's Promotion of Ideology Over Science
    http://www.house.gov/reform/min/politicsandscience/method_committees.htm
    This web page examines manipulation of scientific committees, distortion of scientific information, and interference with scientific research by the Bush administration.
    (Last checked 08/08/03)

    Preserving Life and Liberty
    http://www.lifeandliberty.gov/
    "The Department of Justice’s first priority is to prevent future terrorist attacks. Since its passage following the September 11, 2001 attacks, the Patriot Act has played a key part - and often the leading role - in a number of successful operations to protect innocent Americans from the deadly plans of terrorists dedicated to destroying America and our way of life. While the results have been important, in passing the Patriot Act, Congress provided for only modest, incremental changes in the law. Congress simply took existing legal principles and retrofitted them to preserve the lives and liberty of the American people from the challenges posed by a global terrorist network." A web site created by Attorney General John Ashcroft to defend the U.S. Patriot Act, which has come under mounting criticism. The web page includes a wide variety of publicity materials, including fact sheets on what the law does and does not do.
    (Last checked 08/20/03)

    President's Council on Bioethics
    http://www.bioethics.gov/
    Advising the President on ethical issues related to advances in biomedical science and technology. Includes links to recent policy papers on issues such as human cloning, stem cells, patenting human life, etc. Also contains an interesting Bookshelf section, featuring novels, stories, poems and writings rich in bioethical wisdom, for groups studying together or individuals reading alone.
    (Last checked 08/28/03)

    Rosie Pictures: Select Images Relating to American Women Workers During World War II
    http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/126_rosi.html
    Provides selected images from the collections of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. The images were issued by the U.S. government or by commercial sources during World War II, often to encourage women to join the work force or to highlight other aspects of the war effort. Nearly three million women worked in defense plants during World War II. By 1944, 16% of working women held jobs in war industries. While many of the women had already been employed outside the home before the war, an increasing number of married and middle class women joined the work force during this period. Government propaganda and advertisements sought to encourage such work force participation. One of the best known symbols of this propaganda effort was "Rosie the Riveter." Various accounts of the genesis of the "Rosie the Riveter" figure have appeared. Norman Rockwell created what has probably become the most familiar "Rosie" image for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post (May 29, 1943; copyright, Curtis Publishing Company; P&P reproduction number: LC-USZ62-75181). Rockwell's image shows a muscular woman dressed in overalls, face mask and goggles resting on her forehead, seated eating a sandwich, her riveting tool in her lap, her feet resting on a copy of Mein Kampf. Two weeks after the cover illustration was published, stories appeared in the press extolling the achievement of Rose Hicker and her partner, workers at the Eastern Aircraft Company in Tarrytown, New York, who drove a record number of rivets into a wing of a Grumman "Avenger" Bomber. Real and legendary "Rosies" were not only depicted visually and in the press, but were also celebrated in song and even in a Broadway play, entitled "Rosie the Riveter."
    (Last checked 09/10/03)

    School Bus Safety
    http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/buses/
    It's that time of year again! This web site provides information about the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) School Bus Safety Program, including general information on bus safety, guidelines for occupant protection, federal vehicle safety standards, and links to related resources. A special children's section has a few brochures aimed at children and an article on transporting preschool aged children in buses.
    (Last checked 09/05/03)

    September 11 Digital Archive
    http://www.911digitalarchive.org/
    The Library of Congress announced the official acquisition, on September 10, 2003, of a collection comprising over 130,000 "written accounts, e-mails, audio recordings, video clips, photographs, websites, and other materials that document the attacks on New York City, Washington D.C., and western Pennsylvania and their aftermath." Originally created by the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University and the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, and funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
    (Last checked 09/15/03)

    SmithsonianEducation.org
    http://smithsonianeducation.org/
    The Smithsonian Institution announces the launch of a new Web site for educators, families, and students. Featuring content from 16 Smithsonian museums, the National Zoo, and the Smithsonian's world-class research centers, SmithsonianEducation.org brings the Smithsonian's vast educational resources to millions of classrooms and homes across the nation.
    (Last checked 09/16/03)

    State of the Great Lakes: 2002 Annual Report
    http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-ogl-SOGL02.pdf This annual report focuses on numerous issues impacting the Great Lakes ecosystem including water quality, resource management, and aquatic nuisance species. It features guest authors from education, government, and the environmental community. Courtesy of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
    (Last checked 09/12/03)

    Top Ten List for New Documents Librarians
    http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/fdlp/mgt/top10.html
    All new federal documents librarians should review and become familiar with the resources posted on this list supplied by the Federal Depository Library Program. Source: Michael Sampson, Arthur Neef Law Library, Wayne State University, GOVDOC-M, July 16, 2003.
    (Last checked 07/28/03)

    Trust and Terror: New Demands for Crisis Information Dissemination and Management
    http://www.nclis.gov/info/trust/trust.html
    An online add for a CD-ROM, narrated by Walter Cronkite, describing the proposal of NCLIS to expand the role of libraries as an essential component of U.S. crisis information dissemination and management. The CD-ROM (with brochure included) is available free while supplies last by contacting the NCLIS office (email info@nclis.gov; telephone 202-606-9200). Brochures without the CD-ROM are also available free while supplies last. Web site also provides a powerpoint presentation made by Joan R. Challinor, Vice Chair, NCLIS at the 68th IFLA General Conference, Glasgow, Scotland, August 19, 2002.
    (Last checked 07/30/03)

    U.S. Department of Labor's 2002 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor
    http://www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2002/overview.htm
    This report presents information on the nature and extent of the child labor problem in 146 countries and territories and the efforts being made by their governments to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Bureau of International Labor Affairs’ International Child Labor Program (ICLP) collected data from a wide variety of sources, including the State Department, U.S. embassies and consulates, foreign governments, nongovernmental organizations and international agencies. In addition, bureau staff conducted field visits to many of the countries covered in the report.
    (Last checked 07/30/03)

    U.S. Government Photos and Graphics
    http://www.firstgov.gov/Topics/Graphics.shtml
    FirstGov.gov now offers a page of links to photos and graphics from a variety of federal government agencies. Most of these photos and graphics are in the public domain and can be used or reproduced without permission or fee. Check with each website to be sure. You'll find photos of Earth from Space, photos of National Parks, medical and historical photos and illustrations, and much, much more. Source: Gary Price, ResourceShelf, August 11, 2003.
    (Last checked 09/05/03)

    U.S. Power Grids
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/der/us_pwrgrid.html
    This Website explains the structure and importance of the U.S. Power Grid: "It is important to note that there is no "national power grid" in the United States. In fact, the continental United States is divided into three main power grids: (1) The Eastern Interconnected System, or the Eastern Interconnect, (2) The Western Interconnected System, or the Western Interconnect [and] (3) The Texas Interconnected System, or the Texas Interconnect." With the recent major blackout in the Northeast and Canada, the power grid(s) have become a major topic of discussion.... should we invest billions of dollars to fix the 3 major Internconnects? .... and, if so, who will pay for it? Source: El Dorado County Library, What's Hot, August 25, 2003
    (Last checked 09/15/03)

    U.S. Senate Salary Ledger, 1790-1881
    http://www.senate.gov/pagelayout/history/e_one_section_no_teasers/ledger_slides.htm
    This slide show displays pages from a recently discovered financial ledger detailing nearly a century of salary and mileage payments to senators, from 1790 to 1881. The ledger begins with an introductory page, written by Secretary of the Senate Anson McCook in 1884. Samuel Otis, the first Secretary of the Senate, began the ledger in 1791. McCook had the volume restored and rebound in 1884. Rediscovered late in 2002, the volume has now been digitized and transferred to the National Archives for preservation. For a related article appearing in the March 2003 issue of Red Tape, see http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/nat0302.htm#5.
    (Last checked 07/30/03)

    Window to My Environment
    http://www.epa.gov/enviro/wme/
    Sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in partnership with federal, state, and local partner organizations, Window to My Environment (WME) is a new website designed to improve access to useful community-based environmental information. EPA and the States are developing a comprehensive exchange network that will provide a wide range of shared data and information among EPA, States, Tribes, localities, the regulated community, and other data partners. WME represents a concerted effort to develop a "geographic portal" for integrating that environmental information by local geography to help answer common questions, examine critical problems, and discover potential solutions for environmental protection and human health issues.
    (Last checked 08/27/03)

    World Factbook, 2003
    http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html
    Select a country from the drop-down list, and the country's page will open with a thumbnail print of the country's flag. Click on the print to view an enlargement and description of the flag. Adjacent to the flag is a list of categories that bookmark to locations down the page. You can also browse down the page and view the categories which starts with an introduction that has a map and a brief history of the country. One of the two icons by each heading links to a Field Listing of each country's categories. The other icon links to definitions and notes, such as how an age structure effects socioeconomic issues. Browse down the page to view other categories such as People, Communications and Transnational Issues. This site also features Reference Maps which can be enlarged or downloaded as JPG or PDF files. Additional references in the Appendixes include abbreviations and cross referenced data codes listed by country.
    (Last checked 09/04/03)

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