ODDS AND ENDS : ISSUE 101, JANUARY 2004

A Collection of Web Sites of Possible Interest to Government Documents Librarians

Table of Contents

America on the Move (Smithsonian Institution)
American Notes: Travels in America, 1750-1920
The Arab Population: 2000
Atlantic World: America and the Netherlands
Ballot Proposal Language on Affirmative Action
Borne of the Wind : an Introduction to the Ecology
of Michigan's Sand Dunes
Bounding the Global War on Terrorism
Canada E-Book
CD-ROM Doc: GODORT CD-ROM Documentation Service
Changing the Beat: A Study of the Worklife of Jazz Musicians
A Citizen's Guide to State Government
Corn Maze Geography
DeadBrain
Elections 2004
FEMA for Kids: Tornadoes
George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1799
GovBenefits.gov
Governors Legacy Project
Grants.gov
The Hunt for the USS Alligator
Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2003
Kennedy & Castro: The Secret History
Michigan Beverage Container and Recycling Task Force: 2003 Final Report
Michigan Department of Civil Service Job Postings
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
Report of Solid Waste Landfilled in Michigan, Oct. 1, 2002-Sept. 30, 2003
Michigan Executive Budget
Michigan Financial Literacy Page
Michigan Fish Atlas Maps
Michigan Recreation and Camping Guide, 2003
Michigan School Report Cards
Mistletoe and Birds, Bees, and Other Beasts
National Security and Homeland Security Presidential Directives
The Nation's Christmas Tree -- A Living Memorial
Official Documents
Recalls.gov
Report to the Attorney General on Delays in Forensic DNA Analysis
SciTechResources.gov
Secretary of Defense Annual Report to the President and the Congress (2003)
Smithsonian Institution: America on the Move
Socio-Economic Roots of Radicalism? Towards Explaining the Appeal of Islamic Radicals SWAIS To Disappear at End of Year
Trafficking in Persons Report, 2003
Trails to Utah and the Pacific: Diaries and Letters, 1846-1869
U.S. Acronymns and Abbreviations
U.S. Budget 2005
U.S. Climate at a Glance
Voices from the Days of Slavery
Volunteering in the United States
World Development Report 2004
World Health Report 2003: Shaping the Future

Google
WWW http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/

Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction
also known as the Gilmore Commission
http://www.rand.org/nsrd/terrpanel/
The Gilmore Commission has released the fifth and final report. The commission says that by providing long-term guidance to federal, state, and local government officials, an improved homeland security strategy can help create a “new normalcy” that acknowledges the threat of terrorism will not disappear, but still preserves and strengthens civil liberties.
“There will never be a 100 percent guarantee of security for our people, the economy, and our society,” Gilmore writes in the report’s cover letter. “We must resist the urge to seek total security—it is not achievable and drains our attention from those things that can be accomplished.”
The commission also calls on the president to create an independent, bipartisan oversight board to provide counsel on homeland security efforts that may impact civil liberties, even if such impacts are unintended. The commission says the board is needed because of the potential chilling effect of government monitoring conducted in the name of homeland security.
The report expresses concern about protecting freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the Constitution, which could be violated by government’s increased reliance on sophisticated technology that has vast potential to invade personal privacy.
The Gilmore Commission urges policymakers to move beyond simply reacting to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The report calls for forward-thinking efforts by government at the federal, state and local levels, and by the private sector as well.
Links are provided to all five annual reports at this site.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

America on the Move (Smithsonian Institution)
http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthemove/exhibition/
While most people get on the road each morning around the U.S. to drive to work, they may not think of how the massive interstate system first emerged in the years following World War II. That rather interesting question, along with a number of other transportation themes, is covered in this fine online collection from the Smithsonian Institution. Designed to complement this new exhibit at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., visitors can start at the exhibition section, which is divided into 17 different thematic sections, coupled with a host of visual images, and photographs of the actual exhibit. Even more fun is the collections area, where users of the site can search or browse through the online transportation collection which includes more than a thousand different artifacts and photographs. The site is rounded out by a nice selection of related teaching resource materials and some quirky interactive games where individuals can create their own movie using vehicles from the collection or play a match game involving vehicles from different periods of America's history. Source: Scout Report, December 5, 2003.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

American Notes: Travels in America, 1750-1920
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lhtnhtml
This website, part of the Library of Congress American Memory Project, is comprised of 253 published narratives by Americans and foreign visitors recounting their travels in the colonies and the United States and their observations and opinions about American peoples, places, and society from about 1750 to 1920. Also included is the thirty-two-volume set of manuscript sources entitled Early Western Travels, 1748-1846, published between 1904 and 1907 after diligent compilation by the distinguished historian and secretary of the Wisconsin Historical Society Reuben Gold Thwaites. All items are from the general collections of the Library of Congress. Although many of the authors represented in American Notes are not widely known, the collection includes works by major figures such as Matthew Arnold, Fredrika Bremer, William Cullen Bryant, François René de Chateaubriand, William Cobbett, James Fenimore Cooper, J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur, Charles Dickens, Washington Irving, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, Sir Charles Lyell, William Lyon Mackenzie, André Michaux, Thomas Nuttall, Frederick Law Olmsted, and Robert Louis Stevenson. The narratives in American Notes therefore range from the unjustly neglected to the justly famous, and from classics of the genre to undiscovered gems. Together, they build a mosaic portrait of a young nation.
(Last checked 11/24/03)

The Arab Population: 2000
http://www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-23.pdf
As part of its ongoing series of Census Briefs, the U.S. Census Bureau released this 12-page document in December 2003 that examines the Arab population around the United States. The document begins with a description of how the Census enumerates which groups tend to identify as being of Arab ancestry, and then proceeds to discuss some of the findings from data gathered in the 2000 Census. Some of the findings include that the Arab population increased by nearly 40 percent during the 1990s and that people of Lebanese, Syrian, and Egyptian ancestry accounted for about three-fifths of the Arab population in the United States. The document also contains important information about the spatial distribution among persons of Arab ancestry, such as the finding that approximately half of the Arab population was concentrated in only five states, and that the state with the greatest proportion of Arabs was Michigan. Source: Scout Report, December 19, 2003.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Atlantic World: America and the Netherlands
http://international.loc.gov//intldl/awkbhtml/
Explores the history of the Dutch presence in America and the interactions between the United States and the Netherlands from Henry Hudson's 1609 voyage to the post-World-War-II period. The project is the product of ongoing cooperation between the Library of Congress and the National Library of the Netherlands, which has enlisted the cooperation of other leading Dutch libraries, museums, and archives. Along with Britain, France, Russia, and Spain, the Netherlands was one of the few European powers to claim territory and build settlements on North American soil. The initial stage of this online project, completed in the fall of 2003, focuses on the period between 1609 and 1664, when the Dutch established the colony of New Netherland, located in parts of present-day New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Connecticut. Later stages of the project will cover the role of the Dutch and Dutch-American patriots in the American War of Independence; large-scale migration from the Netherlands to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; "Holland-Mania", or the discovery of Dutch painting and culture by American artists and scholars in the late nineteenth century; and the World War II and post-war periods, including a new wave of post-1945 immigration. The Atlantic World is part of the Library of Congress's Global Gateway project to establish cooperative digital libraries with national libraries from around the world. The companion Atlantic World site of the National Library of the Netherlands, The Memory of the Netherlands, is located at http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl.
(Last checked 12/08/03)

Ballot Proposal Language on Affirmative Action
http://www.michigancivilrights.org/ballot.htm
The Michigan Civil Rights Initiative must gather 317,757 signatures of registered Michigan voters to place the proposal on the November, 2004 ballot. This web page provides the text of the ballot initiative.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Borne of the Wind : an Introduction to the Ecology of Michigan's Sand Dunes http://web4.msue.msu.edu/mnfi/pub/dunes/index.html
Spotted in the University of Michigan online catalog.
(Last checked 12/23/03)

Bounding the Global War on Terrorism
http://www.mipt.org/pdf/BoundingTheGlobalWarOnTerrorism.pdf
"Dr. Jeffrey Record examines three features of the war on terrorism as currently defined and conducted: (1) the administration’s postulation of the terrorist threat, (2) the scope and feasibility of U.S. war aims, and (3) the war’s political, fiscal, and military sustainability. He finds that the war on terrorism--as opposed to the campaign against al-Qaeda--lacks strategic clarity, embraces unrealistic objectives, and may not be sustainable over the long haul. He calls for down-sizing the scope of the war on terrorism to reflect concrete U.S. security interests and the limits of American military power." Courtesy of the U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, December 2003. 62pp.
(Last checked 01/28/04)

Canada E-Book
http://142.206.72.67/r000_e.htm
Much like the rest of the world, Canada is still developing as a nation. To make sense of this ever-changing country, the Canada e-Book uses sound, images, tables, graphs and both analytical and descriptive text to look at Canada—The Land, The People, The Economy and The State. For those of you who collect Canadian documents, the Canada e-Book (11-404-XIE) is based on the 2001 Canada Year Book (11-402-XPE). Courtesy of Statistics Canada.
(Last checked 01/16/04)

CD-ROM Doc: GODORT CD-ROM Documentation Service
http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/govpubs/gitco_docs/gitco.html
The CD-ROM Documentation Project is a cooperative undertaking merging the work of the American Library Association, Government Documents Roundtable Government Information Technology Committee (GITCO) and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (Big Ten schools). Its purpose is to provide a web interface to existing CD-ROM technical documentation, as well as additional documentation provided by documents librarians, in order to improve access to local CD-ROM collections. The Government Publications Department of the University of Iowa is the host site for this project.
This service provides a central location for the collection and dissemination of often hard-to-find documentation, which can eliminate duplication of effort by individual institutions. The service can be linked from each institution's home page and accessed by any user of government information. In many cases, subject-specialist librarians have created the database records, which makes such specialized information available to a larger audience. In addition, this service can serve as an example of the type of documentation that users and library staff need in order to access, use, and manage CD-ROMs. Having and conveying suggested standards for CD-ROM documentation may result in better, more comprehensive information being provided by the issuing agencies or vendors.
(Last checked 12/04/03)

Changing the Beat: A Study of the Worklife of Jazz Musicians
http://www.arts.gov/pub/JazzExecSummary.pdf
"Recognizing the importance of jazz and its artists, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in 2000 commissioned a study of jazz musicians in four U.S. metropolitan areas—Detroit, New Orleans, New York, and San Francisco —to enhance the quality of statistical information, which will be used to help devise strategic ways to further the work of jazz artists.... This study provided an opportunity to examine the working lives of jazz musicians in a systematic way and to produce quantitative and qualitative information about the jazz community, the professional lives of jazz musicians, and the place of jazz in the music industry." Courtesy of the Eldarado County Public Library, What's Hot on the Internet, Dec. 22-29, 2003.
(Last checked 01/06/04)

A Citizen's Guide to State Government
http://michiganlegislature.org/documents/publications/citizensguide.pdf
Take the time to read through the entire Citizen's Guide -- it has answers to some hard-to-find information on term dates of Supreme Court justices, history of the capitol, how to write legislators, and much much more. Courtesy of the Library of Michigan.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Corn Maze Geography: Teaching Geography Using Corn Mazes
http://rockyweb.cr.usgs.gov/public/outreach/cornmazegeography.html
Here's a Corny Approach to Teaching Geography: Corn mazes, those paths cut or plowed in a field of corn in Mid-Michigan and other parts of the country, can be a way to teach geography, according to USGS researchers. The maze patterns can take the face of famous people, maps, flags, drawings, themes, or an infinite number of others shapes. Unlike tracing through a maze with pencil (or crayon) on paper, in a corn maze, the human being becomes the "tracer." Mazes and maps have fascinated people for centuries. Maps are essential tools to study geography, and therefore, corn mazes provide a unique and fun way to learn about geography, including scale, relative and absolute location, land use, and other geographic themes. In a new series of lessons based on national geography content standards, suitable for elementary through university level, USGS Geographer Joseph Kerski explains how to use a-maze-ing corn to teach students about the landscape and its people. Students can analyze land use, topographic maps, aerial photographs, use Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, practice wayfinding, examine soils, and consider the geographic aspects of corn cultivation in conjunction with corn mazes. For more information, call Joseph Kerski at 303-202-4315 or email him at jjkerski@usgs.gov. Courtesy of the USGS!
(Last checked 12/17/03)

DeadBrain
http://www.deadbrain.co.uk/
Those of you who enjoy an occasional dip into The Onion for paradies of government and political news may want to check out another parady web site from the United Kingdom called DeadBrain, the UK's Least Reliable News Source.
(Last checked 12/10/03)

Elections 2004
http://www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/elec2004.html
Choosing a Presidential candidate this coming week? Sample their web sites, complete political biographies, voting records, campaign finances, and polling numbers. You can compare them to yourself on the issues. If you ultimately decide you want to run for the presidency, there's advice on how to do it. Check out your competition for statewide offices if you are a little less ambitious. Want to know more about the issues? There are links to the 9/11 Commission hearings, projected federal budget deficit, No Child Left Behind Act, and Congressional debates prior to the Iraq War. Plus there are the usual academic research tools: National Election Surveys, spreadsheets of previous presidential and congressional elections (campus-licensed), and Boolean protocols for political science journal indexes. Courtesy of Grace York and the University of Michigan Documents Center.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

FEMA for Kids: Tornadoes
http://www.fema.gov/kids/tornado.htm
Tornadoes, like most natural disasters, can be harrowing events for all persons in any given region, and most certainly for young children. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has developed this website to inform children about the nature of tornadoes. From the site's homepage, visitors can read about the experiences of young people who have been present during major tornado-bearing storms. Along with these firsthand accounts, visitors can read about the Fujita tornado scale, watch media clips of tornadoes, and learn about those locations in the home that may provide the best shelter from the effects of a tornado. No doubt many young people will be concerned for the wellbeing of the family pets during such an event, so they will find the section that deals with pets quite valuable. Here interested parties can learn about how best to evacuate various pets safely and what items may help ensure their survival in case of a major disaster. Source: Scout Report, January 23, 2004.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1799
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gwhtml/gwhome.html
On 30 January 2004 the Library of Congress (LC) posted the final release of digital images of the George Washington Papers from the library's Manuscript Division. The George Washington Papers at the LC is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. Because of the wide range of Washington's interests, activities and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history. In this final release, 45 items have been added; letters, survey documents, and other materials date from 1763 to 1797. They are a part of the addenda to the Washington Papers – manuscripts acquired after the bulk of the collection had been processed and microfilmed. This final release brings the total to more than 65,000 items, consisting of correspondence, letter books, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799. Source: NCH WASHINGTON UPDATE (Vol. 10, #5; 12 February 2004).
(Last checked 02/05/04)

GovBenefits.gov
http://www.govbenefits.gov/index.jsp
Welcome to GovBenefits.gov, the official government benefits website. This is a free, confidential tool that helps you find government benefits you may be eligible to receive.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

Governors Legacy Project
http://www.nga.org/governors/1,1169,C_SEARCH_GO%20V,00.html
On 3 February 2004, the National Governors Association announced the availability of a new database for the public to find information about state governors going all the way back to colonial times. The "Governors Legacy Project" is intended to serve as a resource for researchers and can be searched using a number of factors, including term of office, state of birth, military service and other political offices held. Currently the database holds more than 800 entries about the governors of 17 states and territories, Alabama through Iowa. The others are being added alphabetically, state-by-state. Source: NCH WASHINGTON UPDATE (Vol. 10, #5; 12 February 2004).
(Last checked 02/05/04)

Grants.gov
http://grants.gov/
This site allows organizations to electronically find and apply for competitive grant opportunities from all Federal grant-making agencies. Use the colored tabs and links at the top of the screen to access primary sections of the site and links on the left side of the screen to access content within each section.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

The Hunt for the USS Alligator
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2003/s2140.htm
NOAA and the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research have joined forces to uncover the secrets of a technological marvel of the Civil War era akin to the USS Monitor and the CSS Hunley—the USS Alligator. Launched in 1862, the Alligator was the U.S. Navy’s first submarine. While the vessel represented a significant leap forward in naval engineering, complete information about its design and fate has been elusive. Today, NOAA and ONR released findings that help fill large gaps in the history of the all-but-forgotten Union submarine, including details about the Alligator’s inventor, innovative features and loss in April 1863.
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2003
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/iscs03.htm
Presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population. A joint effort by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Center for Education Statistics, the report examines crime occurring in school as well as on the way to and from school. It provides the most current detailed statistical information to inform the Nation on the nature of crime in schools.
(Last checked 01/07/04)

Kennedy & Castro: The Secret History
http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB103/index.htm
Released to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this intriguing electronic briefing book (presented by the National Security Archive at George Washington University), contains an audio tape of the late President Kennedy discussing the possibility of a clandestine meeting with Fidel Castro in Havana (just several weeks before Kennedy's death). Along with this six-minute audio recording, visitors will find other key documents related to the story, including several top secret White House memoranda, a CIA briefing paper, and brief profiles of the various characters who played a role in these matters. As National Security Archive senior analyst Peter Kornbluh remarked, "The documents show that JFK clearly wanted to change the framework of hostile U.S. relations with Cuba. His assassination, at the very moment this initiative was coming to fruition, leaves a major 'what if' in the ensuing history of the U.S. conflict with Cuba." Source: Scout Report, December 19, 2003.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Michigan Beverage Container and Recycling Task Force: 2003 Final Report
http://www.senate.michigan.gov/gop/recycle.pdf
Recommends a $3 per ton surcharge on solid waste Believe it or not, but this report does not recommend expanding Beverage Container law to include juice and water bottles! It does recommend a $3 per ton surcharge on solid waste that will hopefully generate $50 million to fund expansion of local recycling programs.
(Last checked 12/03/03)

Michigan Department of Civil Service
Job Postings
http://www.state.mi.us/mdcs/asp/vacancyweb/vacancyinq.asp
(Last checked 01/14/03)

Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
Report of Solid Waste Landfilled in Michigan, Oct. 1, 2002-Sept. 30, 2003

http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-whm-stsw-landfillreport.pdf
Worried about the amount of Canadian waste headed for Michigan landfills? This report provides statistics.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Michigan Executive Budget
http://www.michigan.gov/budget/0,1607,7-157-11460---,00.html
It's that time of year again and with another $1 billion shortfall predicted, a very important site.
(Last checked 01/28/04)

Michigan Financial Literacy Page
http://www.michigan.gov/cis/0,1607,7-154-10555_12902_28358---,00.html
The Office of Financial and Insurance Services (OFIS), within the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth, has launched a comprehensive web site featuring a variety of financial literacy materials. “To make sound financial decisions consumers need access to reliable information,” said OFIS Commissioner Linda A. Watters. “This consolidated site (actually called Financial Direction) offers links to a wide range of resources along with tools designed to provide students with the fundamentals of financial literacy – before they make critical financial decisions.”
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Michigan Fish Atlas Maps
http://www.michigan.gov/cgi/0,1607,7-158-12540%5F13817%5F13819-30538--,00.html
These ecological maps (in PDF format) show distributions of fish in Michigan, both historical and current, including UMMZ data dating from 1823 and MRI data dating to 1937. Listed in the University of Michigan online catalog.
(Last checked 12/23/03)

Michigan Recreation and Camping Guide, 2003
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/DNR-camping-03guide_58878_7.pdf
Hey, it's never too early to plan vacation escapes! And some people even go camping in the wintertime!
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Michigan School Report Cards
http://ayp.mde.state.mi.us/ayp/
The Michigan School Report Cards provides you with information about the performance of schools in Michigan. You can search or browse for a school to view its report card. The report card provides a composite grade for the school. Then you can View Details on each report card to understand the basis of each grade. This site is designed for parents, citizens, teachers, and school administrators to learn about how schools are both performing and improving. Read our Guide to Reading School Report Cards for more information about interpreting these reports.
(Last checked 02/05/04)

National Security and Homeland Security Presidential Directives
http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/nspd/index.html
In the George W. Bush Administration, the directives that are used to promulgate Presidential decisions on national security matters are designated National Security Presidential Directives (NSPDs). As discussed in NSPD 1, this new category of directives replaces both the Presidential Decision Directives and the Presidential Review Directives of the previous Administration. Unless other otherwise indicated, however, past Directives remain in effect until they are superseded. The first directive, dated 13 February 2001, was formally approved for release by the National Security Council staff on 13 March 2001. On October 29, 2001, President Bush issued the first of a new series of Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPDs) governing homeland security policy. Collected by the Federation of American Scientists.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

The Nation's Christmas Tree -- A Living Memorial
http://www.werc.usgs.gov/news/2001-12-13.jpg
There is science and there is spirit. So in the spirit of an ancient but ageless Santa Claus, the General Grant Tree, designated in 1926 as the Nation's Christmas tree by President Calvin Coolidge, just keeps getting younger. At one time, biologists estimated that the General Grant Tree, a giant sequoia in Kings Canyon National Park in California, was 3,500 years old, but USGS research shows that the tree is a youthful 1,650, plus or minus a few centuries. The tree stands more than 267 feet tall, with a diameter of around 30 feet at the base and the lowest major branch is probably 100 feet above the ground. Although no midget, the General Grant Tree is only the third largest of the sequoias. These are not the oldest, nor are they the tallest or the widest trees on Earth, yet their trunks occupy more space than any other single tree. The tree is decorated by a vast array of natural ornaments: species from lichens to woodpeckers to flying squirrels. Every year, on the second Sunday in December, the annual "Trek to the Tree" takes place. At the tree, as part of a living memorial ceremony, National Park Service rangers place a giant wreath to commemorate those lost in service to their country. Most of the largest sequoias are middle-aged, but they're still growing like teenagers. For more information, call Nate Stephenson at 559-565-3176, or email nstephenson@usgs.gov Courtesy of the USGS!
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Not Just for Kissing: Mistletoe and Birds, Bees, and Other Beasts
http://www.usgs.gov/mistletoe/index.html
The next time you pucker up under the mistletoe, consider that mistletoe also provides essential food, cover, and nesting sites for an amazing number of birds, butterflies, and mammals in the United States. That may lessen the romance, but it sure makes the more than 1,300 species of mistletoe worldwide -- more than 20 of which are endangered -- happy to know that you're thinking about their welfare. Mistletoes are rather strange plants that grow on the branches of trees and shrubs. In fact, according to USGS biologists, the American mistletoe's scientific name, Phoradendron, means "thief of the tree" in Greek. Once its seed lands on a host tree, the mistletoe sends out roots that penetrate the tree and eventually start pirating some of the host tree's nutrients and minerals. But mistletoes are not true parasites; they are "hemi-parasites," because most of them have the green leaves necessary for photosynthesis. Eventually, mistletoes grow into thick masses of branching, misshapen stems, giving rise to a popular name of witches' brooms, or the apt Navajo name of "basket on high." The plant's common name -- mistletoe -- is derived from early observations that mistletoe would often appear in places where birds had left their droppings. "Mistel" is the Anglo-Saxon word for "dung," and "tan" is the word for "twig." Thus, mistletoe means "dung-on-a-twig." Talk about taking the romance out of that next kiss under the mistletoe! Even though bird droppings do not generate mistletoe plants, birds are an important part of mistletoe life. Birds find mistletoe a great place for nesting and many birds eat mistletoe berries, including grouse, mourning doves, bluebirds, evening grosbeaks, robins and pigeons. Courtesy of the USGS!
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Official Documents
http://www.official-documents.co.uk/
The Official Documents website contains a selection of United Kingdom government titles covering a very broad range of topics including the economy, work and welfare, health, transport and the environment. There are two main groups of documents: Command Papers (sometimes known as White or Green Papers) and House of Commons Papers. The latter category includes many annual reports from Government bodies including all the principal executive agencies and the annual Financial Statement and Budget Report and Pre-Budget Report. Acts of Parliament and Statutory Instruments can be found on the Her Majesty's Stationery Office website.
(Last checked 12/10/03)

Recalls.gov
http://www.recalls.gov/
To provide better service in alerting the American people to unsafe, hazardous or defective products, six federal agencies with vastly different jurisdictions have joined together to create www.recalls.gov -- a "one stop shop" for U.S. Government recalls. Follow the tabs to obtain the latest recall information, to report a dangerous product, or to learn important safety tips. Tab buttons currently provided include: Consumer Products, Motor Vehicles, Boats, Food, Medicine, Cosmetics, and Environmental Products.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

Report to the Attorney General on Delays in Forensic DNA Analysis
http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/nij/199425.pdf
Although crime laboratories have made enormous progress in reducing the number of unanalyzed convicted offender samples for DNA databases, they continue to be deluged with analysis requests. This NIJ report presents the results of a task force, convened by NIJ at the request of Attorney General John Ashcroft, to assess existing DNA analysis delays and develop recommendations for eliminating those delays. The report details six recommendations that will serve as the foundation of a comprehensive, national DNA backlog reduction strategy.
(Last checked 12/02/03)

SciTechResources.gov
http://www.scitech.gov/
Provides the scientist, engineer, and science aware citizen with easy access to key government web sites.
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Secretary of Defense Annual Report to the President and the Congress (2003)
http://www.defenselink.mil/execsec/adr2003/adr2003_toc.html
Find out how the U.S. Department of Defense is transforming itself to meet new challenges around the world.
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Socio-Economic Roots of Radicalism? Towards Explaining the Appeal of Islamic Radicals
http://www.mipt.org/pdf/Socio-EconomicRootsOfRadicalism.pdf
"This monograph, by Dr. Alan Richards, addresses the critical questions involved in understanding and coping with the roots of Islamic radicalism. His work closely examines the links between radicalism and a series of crises associated with modernization in the Islamic World." U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, July 2003. 62pp.
(Last checked 01/28/04)

SWAIS To Disappear at End of Year
http://www.gpoaccess.gov
The U.S. Government Printing Office, which provides free access to official Federal government information at http://www.gpoaccess.gov, will discontinue its SWAIS dial-up service as of 12/31/2003, due to the technological evolution of the public's Internet capabilities and the capacity of GPO Access. SWAIS, a text-only dial-in entry to GPO Access databases, was originally offered as an alternative to the GPO Access Web site for those without full Internet access. The necessity for SWAIS has declined over the years as GPO Access incorporated more multimedia content and Internet connections have become more common. For those without Internet access, almost 1,300 Federal depository libraries nationwide offer computers with Web connections for free public access to GPO Access.
(Last checked 11/24/03)

Trafficking in Persons Report, 2003
http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2003/
The Annual Trafficking in Persons Report is about modern day slavery and slave trading....The President, members of Congress, and I share a commitment to end modern day slavery. This report is an important diplomatic tool towards that goal. The report details international and U.S. efforts to end trafficking in persons, to protect and help victims, and prosecute those who treat people like commodities or keep them in slave-like conditions. The report emphasizes the human side of trafficking through victim stories and highlights innovative measures some countries are using to prevent trafficking in persons, prosecute those who traffic in human misery, and protect those most vulnerable to this transnational crime....I hope that this report will be informative and lead countries to strengthen their efforts to combat trafficking in persons. All of us can and must do better in this struggle for human liberty and dignity." -- Secretary of State Colin L. Powell. Additional Background Information.
(Last checked 11/21/03)

Trails to Utah and the Pacific: Diaries and Letters, 1846-1869
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award99/upbhtml/overhome.html
Trails to Utah and the Pacific: Diaries and Letters, 1846-1869 incorporates 49 diaries, in 59 volumes, of pioneers trekking westward across America to Utah, Montana, and the Pacific between 1847 and the meeting of the rails in 1869. In addition to the diaries, the collection includes 43 maps, 82 photographs and illustrations, and 7 published guides for immigrants. Stories of persistence and pain, birth and death, God and gold, trail dust and debris, learning, love, and laughter, and even trail tedium can be found in these original "on the trail" accounts. The collection tells the stories of Mormon pioneer families and others who were part of the national westering movement, sharing trail experiences common to hundreds of thousands of westward migrants. The source materials are drawn from the collections of Brigham Young University, members of the Utah Academic Libraries Consortium, and other archival institutions in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho. Part of the Library of Congress, American Memory Project.
(Last checked 12/08/03)

U.S. Acronyms and Abbreviations
http://usgovinfo.about.com/library/blacronyms.htm
Does the “ABCs” government get you down? Use this handy guide to decipher the alphabet soup of government acronyms. Courtesy of Robert Longley's About.com Compilation on U.S. Government Information/Resources.
(Last checked 11/04/03)

U.S. Budget 2005
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget
The FY05 Budget of the United States Government is now available from the U.S. Government Printing Office. It was transmitted to Congress on February 2, 2004, and covers the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2004. Documents are available as ASCII text and Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF); however, many of the tables found in the Budget are available for separate viewing and downloading as spreadsheets in wk4, xls, and comma delimited formats.
(Last checked 02/05/04)

U.S. Climate at a Glance
http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/cag3/cag3.html
Find 108 years of weather data for the U.S.
(Last checked 12/17/03)

Voices from the Days of Slavery:
Former Slaves Tell Their Stories
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/vfshtml/vfshome.html
As part of the American Memory Project at the Library of Congress, this engaging website offers first-hand audio recollections of the experience of slavery in the American South from 23 African-Americans. The interviews themselves were originally conducted between 1932 and 1975, and contain memories of their lives that include discussions of their feelings on slavery, their families, and on freedom. It is not terribly surprising that very limited biographical information is available about each participant, though the special exhibit that is also available here (titled Faces and Voices From the Presentation), features photographs of some of the interviewees, such as Fountain Hughes, Uncle Bob Ledbetter, and George Johnson. As some of the audio recordings contain a good deal of background noise (and in some cases are incomplete), visitors may also want to follow along by viewing the full-text transcriptions as well. One interview that visitors will want to make sure and listen to is the one with Uncle Billy McCrea conducted in 1940, in which he sings both Blow Cornie Blow and Walk Dooley. Source: Scout Report, January 30, 2004.
(Last checked 02/04/04)

Volunteering in the United States
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.toc.htm
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides this compilation of the latest statistics on volunteering, 2003.
(Last checked 12/18/03)

World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work For Poor People
http://econ.worldbank.org/wdr/wdr2004/
"Broad improvements in human welfare will not occur unless poor people receive wider access to affordable, better quality services in health, education, water, sanitation, and electricity. Without such improvements in services, freedom from illness and freedom from illiteracy - two of the most important ways poor people can escape poverty - will remain elusive to many. The World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work for Poor People says that too often, key services fail poor people - in access, in quantity, in quality. This imperils a set of development targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which call for a halving of the global incidence of poverty, and broad improvements in human development by 2015." Courtesy of the World Bank. Source: Eldarado County Public Library, What's Hot on the Internet, Dec. 8, 2003.
(Last checked 01/06/04)

World Health Report 2003: Shaping the Future
http://www.who.int/whr/en/
This year's report, shaping the future, shows how international action to tackle HIV/AIDS, polio, SARS and noncommunicable diseases can help strengthen health systems and meet other major public health challenges. Courtesy of the World Health Organization.
(Last checked 01/07/04)

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