ODDS AND ENDS : ISSUE 102, MARCH 2004

A Collection of Web Sites of Possible Interest to Government Documents Librarians

Table of Contents

25 African Americans You Need to Know
2004 Social Security/Medicare Report Released
Abrupt Climate Change Scenario
African-American History Month (February 2004) : 50 Years of Change
American Indian Observed
American Photographs: the First Century
Bush Yoga
Calories Count: Report of the Working Group on Obesity
Career Guide to Industries, 2004-2005
College Opportunities Online (COOL)
College Scholarship Fraud Prevention Act of 2000
Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, 2003
Dirty Bomb Scenario
Drawing from Life: Cartoons and Caricatures in American Art
Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medicine Exhibit
Drugs@FDA
e-Scholar
EconData.Net : Your Guide to Regional Economic Data on the Web
Economic Report of the President, 2004
FAFSA - Free Application for Federal Student Aid
Fannie Richards and the Integration of the Detroit Public Schools
FedStats Adding More State and County Data
Gerald Ford Library and Museum
Glass Ceilings : The Status of Women As Officials and Managers in the Private Sector
Government Gazettes Online
Green Book (2004)
Illegal Immigration: In the News
International Narcotics Control Board, 2003 Report
Iraq on the Record
James Leads GPO Into 21st Century
Lincoln Photograph at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863
Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Park
Manufacturing in America
Michigan's Poet Laureate
Michigan Report a Pothole Web page
Michigan Sex Offender Registry Upheld in Court
Michigan Watchable Wildlife
Monitoring Stem Cell Research
National Climatic Data Center Historical Data Available
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2004-2005 Now Available
OMB Watcher
Peacekeeping Best Practices
Presidents of the United States
San Antonio Missions
Science Meets Beauty: Using Medicine to Improve Appearances
Secret No More
Secrets of the Dark Chamber: The Art of the American Daguerreotype
Social Security/Medicare Report (2004) Released
Statistical Abstract of the United States, 2003
Student Guide to Financial Aid, 2004-2005
Sweet Justice
Tulip Times Celebrates Its 75th
United States and Brazil
Women's History Month Websites

Google
WWW http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/

25 African Americans You Need to Know
http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/mag/portfoli/twenty-five.html
These twenty-five African Americans have left their mark on the nation and the world. This diverse group has another thing in common -— they have all called Michigan home. How many can you list before you check the web page? Courtesy of Michigan History Online.
(Last checked 02/26/04)

An Abrupt Climate Change Scenario and Its Implications For United States National Security
http://www.ems.org/climate/pentagon_climate_change.pdf
What would happen if the average annual temperatures drop by 5 degrees Fahrenheit in North America and Asia and by 6 degrees in Europe, while temperatures rise by 4 degrees in the southern hemisphere? The purpose of this report is to imagine the unthinkable - to push the boundaries of current research on climate change so we may better understand the potential implications on United States national security. We have interviewed leading climate change scientists, conducted additional research, and reviewed several iterations of the scenario with these experts. The scientists support this project, but caution that the scenario depicted is extreme in two fundamental ways. First, they suggest the occurrences we outline would most likely happen in a few regions, rather than on globally. Second, they say the magnitude of the event may be considerably smaller. We have created a climate change scenario that although not the most likely, is plausible, and would challenge United States national security in ways that should be considered immediately. Peter Schwartz and Doug Randall for the Department of Defense Office of Net Assessment. 22pages.
(Last checked 02/26/04)

African-American History Month (February 2004) : 50 Years of Change
http://www.census.gov/pubinfo/www/multimedia/AfricanAm.html
To celebrate African-American History Month the U.S. Census Bureau is releasing new analysis of data showing significant improvements, over the past fifty years, for African-Americans in income and education. But, despite these gains, some black leaders are saying the work is not done.
(Last checked 02/19/04)

American Indian Observed
http://archivesofamericanart.si.edu/htgmonth/amerind/amerind.htm
Sketches and Documents From the Collections of the Smithsonian Archives of American Art.
(Last checked 02/25/04)

American Photographs: the First Century
http://americanart.si.edu/collections/exhibits/helios/amerphotos.html
An online exhibit from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's photography collection featuring photographs from 1839-1939.
(Last checked 02/25/04)

Bush Yoga
http://www.bushyoga.com/movie.htm
In which the leader of the free world – or at least the flight-suit-begarbed action figure thereof – demonstrates various poses from the canon, meticulously labeled. Depending on your politics you can take or leave the State of the Union video pastiche linked at the bottom of the page, but the silliness factor in the image collection transcends ideology, not to mention several laws of physiology. Source: USA Today, Feb. 23, 2004.
(Last checked 03/25/04)

Calories Count: Report of the Working Group on Obesity
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/owg-toc.html
Since the late 1980s, adult obesity has steadily increased in this country. About 64 percent of Americans are overweight and more than 30 percent are obese. To help tackle what FDA is calling the "nation's obesity epidemic," the agency released, on March 12, 2004, the final report of its Obesity Working Group. The group's long- and short-term proposals are based on the scientific fact that weight control is mainly a function of caloric balance. That is, calories in must equal calories out. So FDA is focusing on "calories count" as the basis of its actions and the message of its obesity campaign.
Recommended actions include:

  • enhancing the food label to display calorie count more prominently and to use meaningful serving sizes
  • initiating a consumer education campaign focusing on the "Calories Count" message
  • encouraging restaurants to provide nutritional information to consumers
  • stepping up enforcement actions concerning accuracy of food labels
  • revising FDA guidance for developing drugs to treat obesity
  • working cooperatively with other government agencies, non-profits, industry, and academia on obesity research
    (Last checked 03/15/04)

    Career Guide to Industries, 2004-2005
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/
    The Career Guide to Industries provides information on available careers by industry, including the nature of the industry, working conditions, employment, occupations in the industry, training and advancement, earnings and benefits, employment outlook, and lists of organizations that can provide additional information. This edition of the Career Guide discusses 42 industries, accounting for over 3 out of every 4 wage and salary jobs in 2002. The Career Guide is a companion to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, which provides information on careers from an occupational perspective.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    College Opportunities Online (COOL)
    http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cool/
    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) College Opportunities On-Line (COOL) is a direct link to nearly 7,000 colleges and universities in the country. Whether for large universities, small liberal arts colleges, specialized schools, community colleges, career or technical colleges, or trade schools, IPEDS COOL offers information on enrollment, Awards/degrees conferred, cost (updated for 2003-04) and financial aid, accreditation, and campus crime statistics. And, for the first time, it has graduation rates based on first-time, full-time degree-seeking undergraduate students; the rate is broken down by bachelor's degree-seeking students, gender, and race.
    (Last checked 03/16/7/04)

    College Scholarship Fraud Prevention Act of 2000
    First Annual Report:
    http://www.ftc.gov/os/2002/05/scholarshipfraudreport2001.pdf
    Second Annual Report:
    http://www.ftc.gov/os/2003/05/collegesfpactreport.pdf
    Traces the FTC's efforts to fight scholarship scams.
    (Last checked 02/25/04)

    Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, 2003
    http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2003/
    Annual State Department review of human rights on a country by country basis. Introduction offers a summary view of the major events of the year.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    The "Dirty Bomb" Scenario
    http://hps.org/documents/RDD_report.pdf
    After Jose Padilla was arrested in 2002 for allegedly planning a "dirty bomb" attack, Attorney General John Ashcroft described such a device—conventional explosives wrapped around radioactive contaminants—as an instrument of "mass death and injury." A team at the National Defense University has spent the past year assessing the real nature of the threat, and its findings are disturbing: a successful dirty-bomb attack might contaminate an area the size of the Washington Mall, and the "maximum credible events" envisioned by the report could kill dozens or hundreds, sicken thousands, and ruin a metropolis (contaminated buildings would probably have to be razed and the debris carted off, along with a meter of topsoil, in what experts call "muck and truck"). Worse, terrorists might achieve the "dirty" results without the bomb, by quietly releasing radiation through smoke or an aerosol, so that the damage would be done before the attack was even noticed. To explore the consequences of such an attack, researchers looked at a real-life disaster that occurred in the city of Goiânia, Brazil, in 1987. Junk-metal pirates salvaged cesium from an abandoned radiation lab and passed the "glowing blue material" to family and friends. The cesium eventually spread through buses, ambulances, animal fur, bars, and restaurants, until 112,000 Brazilians were tested for radiation in an Olympic-size soccer stadium; 249 people were determined to have been contaminated, forty-nine were hospitalized, and five died. (Goiânia, bitter from the ensuing economic isolation and stigma, added the universal insignia for radioactivity to its flag.) Source: "Dirty Bombs: The Threat Revisited," Peter D. Zimmerman with Cheryl Loeb, National Defense University, cited in The Atlantic Monthly; April 2004; Primary Sources; Volume 293, No. 3; 42-44.
    (Last checked 03/26/04)

    Drawing from Life: Cartoons and Caricatures in American Art
    http://www.sil.si.edu/ondisplay/caricatures/
    A historical collection, viewable by topic (marriage, political cartoons, fishing, etc.), from artists ranging by date from William Hogarth (considered the father of the genre) through Art Young. Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution American Art Museum/National Portrait Gallery.
    (Last checked 02/25/04)

    Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medicine Exhibit
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/dreamanatomy/
    The U.S. National Library of Medicine – that’s a division of the National Institutes of Health, for those keeping track of tax-dollar expenditures – is showcasing this collection of beautiful, often fantastical drawings of the human body, most of which date from the first few centuries after the dawn of the printing press. Between 1680 and 1800 there was a drive among anatomists to make anatomy illustrations more faithful to science (no small issue in the era before X-rays and the Visible Human Project); the variety of responses to this push are gorgeous, bizarre, sometimes creepy and uniformly worth your time. Source: USA Today Hot Site, January 13, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Drugs@FDA
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda/
    A searchable database that offers information about approved prescription drugs, some over-the-counter drugs, and discontinued drugs. It's the first Web resource that provides a comprehensive overview of a drug product's approval history.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    e-Scholar
    http://www.studentjobs.gov/e-scholar.asp
    The e-Scholar website was unveiled in April 2003 by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). It provides information about hundreds of federally-funded education scholarships, fellowships, grants, internships, and cooperative programs valued at more than $400 million. The site contains information for both students - from high school students through doctoral students - and career professionals.
    (Last checked 02/16/04)

    EconData.Net : Your Guide to Regional Economic Data on the Web
    http://econdata.net/
    A portal for online socioeconomic data at the state and substate geographic level. Also offers a 100 page user's guide for understanding regional socioeconomic data. Sponsored by the Economic Development Administration and the Census Bureau. Source: ResourceShelf, March 11, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Economic Report of the President, 2004
    http://www.gpoaccess.gov/eop
    The Economic Report of the President has been published since 1950 and is available on GPO Access from 1995 forward at . A searchable database is available from 1996 forward. Documents are available as ASCII text and PDF files. GPO Access also offers the Economic Report of the President as a single-file download in PDF format as well as a listing of statistical tables from the Appendix in xls and zip formats for convenience. Copies of the 2004 Economic Report of the President (S/N: 040-000-00765-2) in paper are also available for purchase from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at for $33.00 or for examination at participating Federal depository libraries. GOVDOC-L, Feb. 9, 2004.
    (Last checked 02/10/04)

    FAFSA
    http://fafsa.ed.gov/
    FAFSA --the Free Application for Federal Student Aid -- opens the door to the federal student aid process. Every step you take will get you closer to achieving your educational goals. Find out what you can expect from beginning to end on this web page.
    (Last checked 02/23/04)

    Fannie Richards and the Integration of the Detroit Public Schools
    http://www.michigan.gov/hal/0,1607,7-160-17451_18670_18793-52956--,00.html
    When were the Detroit Public Schools first integrated? What was the name of the court case? If you guessed Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), you'd be way off! Try Joseph Workman v. The Board of Education of Detroit (1869). Read an interesting article by Robin S. Peebles posted by the state of Michigan in honor of Black History Month, 2004.
    (Last checked 02/26/04)

    FedStats Adding More State and County Data
    http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/nat0402.htm#3
    This link will take you to an article in the News Around the Country section.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Gerald Ford Library and Museum
    http://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/
    The Ford Library (in Ann Arbor, Michigan) and Museum (in Grand Rapids, Michigan) promote popular interest and scholarly research in U.S. history during the post-World War II era, especially the Ford presidency (1974-77).The Library collects and preserves the archival record, and aids public access. The Museum presents an ambitious program of exhibits and special events.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Glass Ceilings : The Status of Women As Officials and Managers in the Private Sector
    http://www.eeoc.gov/stats/reports/glassceiling/index.pdf
    An analysis of 2002 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission data to explore patterns and disparities in women's initial selection for and advancement in management positions. Follows 1995 Federal Glass Ceiling Commission finding that America's labor force is gender and race segregated. Courtesy of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Government Gazettes Online
    http://www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/gazettes/index.htm
    Government Gazettes, which are published by federal governments worldwide, are the means through which the government can communicate to officials and the general public. Although most countries publish a gazette, their regularity and content varies widely, which is noted in the description of each gazette. Gazettes are useful not only to monitor the actions of the government, but also as primary source documentation in research. This website attempts to list all online government gazettes and their characteristics to aid researchers. A description of the contents and coverage are included for each gazette. Anyone wishing to do further research on foreign law will find useful resources in the bibliography. A University of Michigan School of Information Alternative Spring Break project by Anthony Davis and Caroline Crouse, who worked at the United Nations Dag Hammersköld Library for one week looking for online gazettes so that the library could weed their collection. Source: Sabrina Pacifici's Be Specific, March 15, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Green Book (2004)
    http://waysandmeans.house.gov/Documents.asp?section=813
    Describes and offers historical data on a variety of federal government programs which provide assistance to the American people. Latest edition of a standard reference source. From the House Committee on Ways and Means.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Illegal Immigration: In the News
    http://usinfo.state.gov/regional/ea/chinaaliens/inthenews.htm
    Briefs from selected newspaper, magazine and journal articles as well as other sources discussing topics relevant to illegal immigration. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of State, International Information Programs.
    (Last checked 03/24/04)

    International Narcotics Control Board, 2003 Report
    http://www.incb.org/e/ar/2003/index.htm
    In this report, the Board attempts to draw the attention of Governments to the impact of drug abuse and trafficking on the development of violence and crime at the community level. It also focuses on the relationship between illicit drug abuse, crime and violence with respect to individuals, families, neighbourhoods and communities, taking into account both criminality and victimization.
    Drug trafficking and related violent crime link local communities with transnational criminal networks. While the INCB acknowledges the importance of these issues at the national and international levels, this report will focus more on the equally important localized and targeted interventions with respect to groups engaging in or at risk of violent drug-related crime and on the affected communities.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    Iraq on the Record: The Bush Administration's Public Statements on Iraq
    http://www.house.gov/reform/min/features/iraq_on_the_record/
    Prepared at the direction of Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Committee on Government Reform Minority Office, the Iraq on the Record Database is a searchable collection of 237 specific misleading statements about the threat posed by Iraq made by the five Administration officials most responsible for providing public information and shaping public opinion on Iraq: President Bush, Vice President Cheney, Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, Secretary of State Powell, and National Security Advisor Rice.The Iraq on the Record Report is a comprehensive examination of these statements. Spotted on Gary Price's ResourceShelf, March 23, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    James Leads GPO Into 21st Century
    http://www.insightmag.com/news/2004/02/03/Features/
    Picture.Profilejames.Leads.Gpo.Into.21st.Century-582288.shtml

    Article about the Public Printer posted Jan. 29, 2004 by Stephen Goode; published: Tuesday, February 3, 2004 in Insight on the News. GOVDOC-L, Feb. 9, 2004.
    (Last checked 02/09/04)

    Lincoln Photograph at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863
    http://lcweb.loc.gov/exhibits/gadd/gaphot.html
    http://www.museum.msu.edu/museum/msgc/jul03.html
    At the dedication ceremony for a cemetery for Union soldiers at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address, commonly considered one of the finest speeches ever uttered by any politician. Lincoln articulated an eloquent memorial to the thousands of Union soldiers who fell on the battlefields of Gettysburg, and argued that "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." This web link provides the only known photograph of Lincoln at the dedication ceremony.
    Check out the second link for the only known stained glass window in Michigan portraying Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address! It's located at the First Congregational Church, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    (Last checked 03/24/04)

    Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Park
    http://www.nps.gov/lyjo/
    Hey, not everyone can visit the Texas White House of Lyndon B. Johnson over spring break as I did. This web site is a good substitute. For more in-depth information, consider taking a look at LBJ's Texas White House. Learn how the four-year old LBJ visited the one-room school house about 200 yards from his home so often that his mother persuaded the school teacher to allow him to attend full-time! No wonder LBJ later started the Head-Start program for other children across the country.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    Manufacturing in America : A Comprehensive Strategy
    to Address the Challenges to U.S. Manufacturers

    http://www.commerce.gov/DOC_MFG_Report_Complete.pdf
    Describes the manufacturing initiative of the U.S. Department of Commerce to identify challenges facing American manufacturing from global competition and offer recommendations for improving American performance. Also available in paper: (C 1.2:AM 3/3)
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Michigan's Poet Laureate
    http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/extra/guest/poet.html
    In 1895, Edgar A. “Eddie” Guest worked for the Detroit and worked his way up from office boy to eventually becoming a “Poet of the People.” With the consent of the Free Press, Guest’s “poem a day” went into syndication and appeared in over 250 newspapers. With a poem in print every day for thirty years, Guest’s poems reached a wide and admiring audience. At the suggestion of readers, Guest compiled his poems into book form, totaling twenty. On March 2, 1952, he was made Michigan’s Poet Laureate, the first and only person ever to be given that title. This web page, a Michigan History Online Extra, supplements an article appearing in the March/April 2004 print edition of Michigan History.
    (Last checked 03/17/04)

    Michigan Report a Pothole Web page
    http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,1607,7-151-9615-69798--,00.html
    Courtesy of the Michigan Department of Transportation.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Michigan Sex Offender Registry Upheld in Court
    http://www.mipsor.state.mi.us
    The 6th U.S. Court of Appeals has upheld the legality of the Michigan's sex registry, saying that simply providing the names and addresses of all convicted of a sex offense does not imply any or all are dangerous to society. Source: Lansing State Journal, Feb. 26, 2004, p.1B.
    (Last checked 02/26/04)

    Michigan Watchable Wildlife
    http://www.michigandnr.com/publications/pdfs/wildlife/viewingguide/
    This online version of the popular Michigan Wildlife Viewing Guide, features 121 of the best places in Michigan to view wildlife. We've also added links to some of the best resources available. Some sites in this guide are barrier-free; others are rugged and undeveloped. No matter where you are in the state, sites in this guide are only minutes away!
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Monitoring Stem Cell Research
    http://www.bioethics.gov/reports/stemcell/index.html
    We hope the report, with its overview chapters on the law, ethics, and science of stem cell research, and its extensive supporting material located in the appendices, will serve as a source of clear, intelligible, and useful information for both policymakers and the general public regarding the current state of this important research and of the debates that surround it. A publication of the President's Council on Bioethics, January 2004.
    (Last checked 03/24/04)

    National Climatic Data Center Historical Data Available
    http://www7.ncdc.noaa.gov/SerialPublications/index.html
    "NCDC has now placed thousands of previously inaccessible publications online. The Serial Publications web system now includes the Climatological Data, Storm Data, Monthly Climatic Data for the World, and Hourly Precipitation Data publications; for the full period of record for each publication. Publications from as far back as the late 1800’s can now be easily retrieved and viewed or printed by any user." Visit a federal depository library for free access; otherwise searches cost a nominal fee. Source: Gary Price's ResourceShelf, March 15, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
    http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/nat0402.htm#11
    This link will take you to an article in the News from Around the Country Section.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2004-2005 Now Available
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/
    The Occupational Outlook Handbook is a nationally recognized source of career information, designed to provide valuable assistance to individuals making decisions about their future work lives. Revised every two years, the Handbook describes what workers do on the job, working conditions, the training and education needed, earnings, and expected job prospects in a wide range of occupations.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    OMB Watcher
    http://www.ombwatch.org/article/archive/9/
    Not a government document, but may be of interest to government documents librarians. This free online newsletter provides analyses and regular updates on developments in each of the main areas of OMB Watch's work: federal budget, information policy, non-profit issues, and the right-to-know. All issues from Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 27, 2000) to date are available.
    (Last checked 02/10/04)

    Peacekeeping Best Practices
    http://www.peacekeepingbestpractices.unlb.org/
    "Publications; extensive database of reports, papers and speeches related to peacekeeping; events calendar; directory of organizations active in the area of peace and security; etc." Courtesy of the United Nations. Spotted on Gary Price's ResourceShelf, March 22, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Presidents of the United States
    http://www.uspresidency.com/
    Quick – who was the first U.S. President? Wrong! At least, so this site tells us – documenting, as it does, no fewer than 10 possible holders of the office between 1774 and 1778. These ten men were the leaders of the Confederation Congress and Continental Congress, which (as you know if you read clear through that John Adams biography like you said you did) preceded Mr. Washington’s inauguration in 1789. Deep historical truth? Trivial anomaly? Read all about it and decide for yourself on this absorbing corner of the great Virtualology.com site. Source: USA Today Hot Site, January 28, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    San Antonio Missions National Historic Park
    http://www.nps.gov/saan/home.htm
    Hey, not everyone can visit the San Antonio Missions over spring break as I did. This web site is a good substitute. If you dig far enough, you can learn how the Catholic Church tried to turn the native Indians into loyal subjects of the Spanish Crown (taxpayers). You can also learn about the mission Indian vaquero, the original cowboy! For information about another San Antonio Mission now run by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, see Alamo.
    (Last checked 03/15/04)

    Science Meets Beauty: Using Medicine to Improve Appearances
    http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2004/204_beauty.html
    The FDA evaluates cosmetic treatments, such as products designed to restore a youthful appearance, and approves those shown to be safe and effective. Lists some of the more productive procedures! Article from FDA Consumer, Volume 38, Number 2, March-April 2004.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Secret No More
    http://www.newstrench.com/01secret/01secret.htm
    The Thunder and Lightning News Service is providing a subject guide to thousands of FBI files (and their file numbers) that are now publicly accessible. In many cases, these files have never been seen outside the FBI." Information about filing FOIA requests is also provided. The guide is being compiled by Michael J. Ravnitzky. Source: Gary Price, ResourceShelf, Feb. 28, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/12/04)

    Secrets of the Dark Chamber:
    The Art of the American Daguerreotype
    http://americanart.si.edu/collections/exhibits/helios/darkchamber.html
    We have seen the views taken by the Daguerreotype, and have no hesitation in avowing, that they are the most remarkable objects of curiosity and admiration, in the arts, that we have ever beheld. Their exquisite perfection almost transcends the bounds of sober belief. -—The Knickerbocker, 1839. Courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Social Security/Medicare Report (2004) Released
    Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age
    and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds (2004)

    http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/TR/TR04/
    Medicare will have to begin dipping into its trust fund this year to keep up with expenditures and will go broke by 2019 without changes in a program that is swelling because of rising health costs, trustees reported Tuesday.
    Social Security's finances showed little change, and its projected insolvency date remained 2042.
    The deteriorating financial picture for the health care program for older and disabled Americans is a result, in part, of the new Medicare prescription drug law that will swell costs by more than $500 billion over 10 years, according to the annual report by government trustees.
    Provisions of the law that President Bush signed into law in December "raise serious doubt about the sustainability of Medicare under current financing arrangements," the trustees said.
    The 2019 go-broke date for the Medicare trust fund, which is devoted primarily to paying beneficiaries' hospital bills, is seven years sooner than what the trustees projected last year.
    The trustees' report is the first official estimates of the long-term costs of the new Medicare law in December. As they did last year, the trustees said that projected lower tax receipts devoted to the program and higher expenditures for inpatient hospital care also contributed to the growing financial problem.
    Source: Social Security Administration Press Release, March 23, 2004 and Mark Sherman and Leigh Strope, Associated Press Report, March 23, 2004.
    (Last checked 03/23/04)

    Statistical Abstract of the United States, 2003
    http://www.census.gov/prod/www/statistical-abstract-03.html
    When it comes to statistics resources, the Statistical Abstract can be considered the Hope Diamond in a field of coal! Note that the electronic version also provides links to the 1995-2002 editions as well.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Student Guide to Financial Aid, 2004-2005
    http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/index.html
    The Student Guide is a comprehensive resource on student financial aid from the U.S. Department of Education. Grants, loans, and work-study are the three major forms of aid available through the Department's Federal Student Aid office. Updated each award year, The Student Guide tells you about the programs and how to apply for them. The Student Guide 2004-05 -- for the July 1, 2004 - June 30, 2005 award year -- is currently available to download in pdf format in English and Spanish, with html web pages scheduled to be added soon.
    (Last checked 03/17/04)

    Sweet Justice
    http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/mag/detroit/pdf/ja99swe.pdf
    I think this incident may have been made into a movie. Dr. Ossian Sweet and his wife buy a house in a white Detroit neighborhood in 1925 only to end up being accused of murder. The ACLU stepped in and hired Clarence Darrow to defend the black couple. Source: Joseph Turrini, Michigan History Magazine, July/August 1999. Posted by the state of Michigan in honor of Black History Month.
    (Last checked 02/26/04)

    Tulip Times Celebrates Its 75th
    http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/extra/tulips/tuliptime75.html
    These historic souvenirs and publications are part of the Tulip Time collection at the Holland Museum and Archives, an online bonus for the readers of Michigan History Magazine. the print edition of the March/April issue features an article on "75 Years of Tiptoeing Through the Tulips".
    (Last checked 03/17/04)

    United States and Brazil
    http://international.loc.gov/intldl/brhtml/
    The United States and Brazil: Expanding Frontiers, Comparing Cultures explores the history of Brazil, interactions between Brazil and the United States from the eighteenth century to the present, and the parallels and contrasts between Brazilian and American culture and history. The project is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the National Library of Brazil.
    Through the presentation in digital form of books, maps, prints and photographs, manuscripts and other documents from the collections of the partner libraries, this project illuminates five main themes related to the history of Brazil and the interactions between the United States and Brazil: Historical Foundations, Ethnic Diversity, Culture and Literature, Mutual Impressions, and Biodiversity. Historical Foundations was launched in December 2003; the other sections are in process.
    The United States and Brazil: Expanding Frontiers, Comparing Cultures is part of the Library of Congress's Global Gateway project to establish cooperative digital libraries with national libraries around the world. The site of the National Library of Brazil, The Library of Congress’s partner in this project, is located at http://www.bn.br.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

    Women's History Month Websites
    http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/red_tape/nat0402.htm#14
    This link takes you to the News from Around the Country section.
    (Last checked 03/25/04)

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